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300 rounds/hour?

nemesisenforcernemesisenforcer Member Posts: 10,513 ✭✭✭
I keep hearing that you can crank out 300 rounds/hour on the Dillon progressive but I can't seem to break 100-125 because the primer feeder has to be refilled regularly, and that sucks up a lot of time.

Is there some trick I'm missing to speed up this step?

Comments

  • CapnMidnightCapnMidnight Member Posts: 8,520
    edited November -1
    Buy more than 1 primer feed.
    W.D.
  • geeguygeeguy Member Posts: 1,047
    edited November -1
    Neme: Capt is right, but 1st question, do you "have" a primer feeder tube (I assume you don't load them buy hand, but you never know)? If not buy several. Are you setting up your cases and bullets for easy access?

    Even loading pistol match on a sq. deal (looking for powder in each case) I do about 200/hr which includes reloading my primer tubes. Reg. "plinker" 9mm is about 350/hr., and I'm old and slow, so something is not right.

    Good luck
  • Tailgunner1954Tailgunner1954 Member Posts: 7,815
    edited November -1
    Most of the "I get xxx RPH off my xyz press" are "burst" rates.
    IE 100 rounds in 20 minutes (or 50 in 10, etc) of handle pulling, before having to stop to refill the components/clear a jam, is stated as 300/hour (even though the total output for the clock hour may be closer to 150-200 rounds)
  • NeoBlackdogNeoBlackdog Member Posts: 12,560 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I use three primer feed tubes and have them all filled prior to starting to load. I once sat down and timed how long it took for me to load 100 rounds of 40 S&W. I didn't rush, just went at a comfortable pace and checked to make sure each case was charged with powder. It took 9 min 4 sec. I would think if a guy had 5 feed tubes ready to go he could crank out 500/hr pretty easy.
  • the middlethe middle Member Posts: 3,089
    edited November -1
    I have six tubes I fill at start (I like to load 600 round lots when I can), and it helps if you have Dillons primer fliper tray. Works very well, just like most of Dillons stuff (all but their powder measures!!)

    Or you can lay down far more money than it worth and get Dillons electric motor operated primer tube filler. Not worth the bucks in my opinion, but to each their own.
  • steve45steve45 Member Posts: 2,847 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Not sure how many rounds I load at any one time. I load 100, build a cocktail, load 100 build a cocktail, dont remember much after awhile.[;)]
  • TANK78ZTANK78Z Member Posts: 1,164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    As others have said multiple primer tubes are a must, and the auto case feed speeds things up, of course a reloading buddy makes all go faster.
    Shifting back and forth as needed between "jobs" of primer tube loading[ I have six of each size], powder watch/refill, dumping extra cases into the case loader, inspecting loaded rounds, powder weight check every 75-100 rounds, and of course pulling the handle .
    After setting up for a specific load on my 650 for pistol reloading I rarely if ever have any problem that takes more then a few seconds to clear.
    With a friend helping , we have done 600 pistol rounds an hour without rushing, just steady work.
    With a complete loading session of 3 hours from start to finish--- from set up to boxing and cleanup 1,500 rounds is our norm, so 500 rounds per hour while having a fun evening with a buddy. That's plenty fast for me.
    Now rifle reloads take us a while longer, we average less then half that.
  • bpostbpost Member Posts: 31,137 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I used a Dillon 1000B to produce more than that routinely but the owner of the shop kept the powder full, case feeder loaded with lubed clean cases, primers fed, loaded rounds removed and the bullet tray kept replenished.

    All I did was crank the handle like a mad man in a careful manner. I did pause while he filled to powder measure unless I was clearing a jamb when he would top off the powder while I cleared the station. I was cranking out over 750 rounds of 223 an hour.

    I was young, strong as an ox, dumber than a bank mule with boundless energy making three bucks an hour plus all shooting supplies at cost.

    Too bad all that energy was wasted on my youth. Now a single stage press is just fine for all my needs!!! [:D]
  • the middlethe middle Member Posts: 3,089
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by bpost
    I used a Dillon 1000B to produce more than that routinely but the owner of the shop kept the powder full, case feeder loaded with lubed clean cases, primers fed, loaded rounds removed and the bullet tray kept replenished.

    All I did was crank the handle like a mad man in a careful manner. I did pause while he filled to powder measure unless I was clearing a jamb when he would top off the powder while I cleared the station. I was cranking out over 750 rounds of 223 an hour.

    I was young, strong as an ox, dumber than a bank mule with boundless energy making three bucks an hour plus all shooting supplies at cost.

    Too bad all that energy was wasted on my youth. Now a single stage press is just fine for all my needs!!! [:D]


    Yes, but what a cool job for a young man....and you have seen just about everything that could go wrong with a progressive and now know what to watch for....

    Im sure you did less cool, harder work for less money in your time.
  • bpostbpost Member Posts: 31,137 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by the middle
    quote:Originally posted by bpost
    I used a Dillon 1000B to produce more than that routinely but the owner of the shop kept the powder full, case feeder loaded with lubed clean cases, primers fed, loaded rounds removed and the bullet tray kept replenished.

    All I did was crank the handle like a mad man in a careful manner. I did pause while he filled to powder measure unless I was clearing a jamb when he would top off the powder while I cleared the station. I was cranking out over 750 rounds of 223 an hour.

    I was young, strong as an ox, dumber than a bank mule with boundless energy making three bucks an hour plus all shooting supplies at cost.

    Too bad all that energy was wasted on my youth. Now a single stage press is just fine for all my needs!!! [:D]


    Yes, but what a cool job for a young man....and you have seen just about everything that could go wrong with a progressive and now know what to watch for....

    Im sure you did less cool, harder work for less money in your time.


    Throwing thousands of bales of hay for a buck an hour on a HOT humid summer day will get your attention too.[;)]
  • dcs shootersdcs shooters Member Posts: 10,969
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by the middle
    I have six tubes I fill at start (I like to load 600 round lots when I can), and it helps if you have Dillons primer fliper tray. Works very well, just like most of Dillons stuff (all but their powder measures!!)

    Or you can lay down far more money than it worth and get Dillons electric motor operated primer tube filler. Not worth the bucks in my opinion, but to each their own.


    Same here, six tubes that get filled before loading [;)][:)]
  • Riomouse911Riomouse911 Member Posts: 3,468 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    After having some undercharged .38 Spl. cases loaded on a progressive cause me no end of troubles...both in stuck boolits AND having to manually disassemble the remaining 490 out of 500 rounds and do them all over again, I'm leaning now more into quality, patience and careful load checking than cranking out loads in numbers...

    Be safe!
  • Hawk CarseHawk Carse Member Posts: 4,296 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I don't understand why filling extra primer tubes before actually pulling the handle does not count as part of the loading process and time spent.
    Me? I am glad of the break every hundred. It rests my brain and gives me a chance to check and replentish powder, brass, and bullets as well as primers.
  • nemesisenforcernemesisenforcer Member Posts: 10,513 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Hawk Carse
    I don't understand why filling extra primer tubes before actually pulling the handle does not count as part of the loading process and time spent.
    Me? I am glad of the break every hundred. It rests my brain and gives me a chance to check and replentish powder, brass, and bullets as well as primers.


    I kind of agree. I just thought I was doing something wrong.

    I think Tailgunner is right: the 300 rounds/hour figure comes from timing 50 rounds and extrapolating, without taking into account the prep work.

    For me, it's as much social as anything as the press is at my buddy's house and we spend as much time talking as loading.
  • mango tangomango tango Member Posts: 3,829
    edited November -1
    I think I have about 10 tubes for primers, I have loaded 350+ 9mm in an hour, haven't hit 400 yet, just short!
  • gunnut505gunnut505 Member Posts: 10,290
    edited November -1
    Yep, it's always the Progressive loaders' fault that you underfill/overfill cases, why there's absolutely no need to look at each case, or check your measure's output, ever!

    If one reads the manual, takes the time to set up the dies, weigh every 10-20 rounds to check the measure, and follows normal reloading rules; you too could turn out several hundred rounds each and every hour that perform as well as the recipe you use.

    EOD guys don't use shortcuts; why would a reloader?
  • midnightrunpaintballermidnightrunpaintballer Member Posts: 2,233 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The primer tubes hold 100 primers. How would having to refill it affect the amount of time it takes you to do 100?

    My point is, See how much time it takes you to load 100 rounds. And figure things from there.

    My method is to fill the primer feeder and then refill the tube. Have the tube on standby. That way I can do 200 rounds without refilling anything. For 223, I top off powder after the 200 primers are gone and refill primer feeder and tube again.

    Having an assistant to keep primer tubes full helps a little.

    I quit trying to race it a long time ago. If I wanted faster, I would've bought a 1050 with a motor... [:D]
  • MIKE WISKEYMIKE WISKEY Member Posts: 9,295 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    "EOD guys don't use shortcuts;"........I have to disagree, if you've ever seen an EOD guy running......he'll use every short cut he can find [:D]
    as to the question........if loading something simple (9mm, .45 acp, ect.) 300 rds/hr is 'do-able' even loading the primer tube as you go.
  • nemesisenforcernemesisenforcer Member Posts: 10,513 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I may have underestimated my load speed; today I turned out 150 in an hour with a primer tube refill and a couple quick breaks to run next door to check on something.
  • jonkjonk Member Posts: 10,121
    edited November -1
    I've never timed myself on a Dillon; however, even on my cheapo Lee Pro 1000 I can do 150 in an hour if I have all my stuff laid out right. I'd think the Dillon would be faster, so sumthin ain't going right.
  • RobOzRobOz Member Posts: 9,195 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by jonk
    I've never timed myself on a Dillon; however, even on my cheapo Lee Pro 1000 I can do 150 in an hour if I have all my stuff laid out right. I'd think the Dillon would be faster, so sumthin ain't going right.


    Do you mean that your brass is prepped and primed? I can do an easy hundred if I'm throwing the charges with prepped and primed brass.
  • jonkjonk Member Posts: 10,121
    edited November -1
    No, I just mean my pile of bullets, brass, and primers all laid out nicely and ready to go.

    Not sure what is taking guys so long; progressive aside, I just did 100 on my turret press in an hour yesterday (380s) and that's with using four pulls of the handle, manually seating primers, and manually actuating the powder dispenser.
  • RobOzRobOz Member Posts: 9,195 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    so no trimmer or deburring. That is the part I hate with a passion. I was thinking of getting me one of them mail order brides for just that purpose. My buddy told me just don't let them watch any TV and you might just be alright.[8D]
  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    I load 400 + an hour on my star with with FREELOADER+Hulme Case feeder and Brewster indexer along with my designed ejector.[^] But this is with one loading tool as well as using a Star Lubersizer to lube and size Lead bullets. Best machine ever made IMHO like a well tuned BMW compared to a DILLON/YUGO The star powder drop beats ALL others HANDS DOWN[^]
  • Hawk CarseHawk Carse Member Posts: 4,296 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Starting with primer magazine and powder measure loaded, plenty of brass and bullets handy, it took me 19 minutes to load a hundred 9mms on the 550. And that includes pulling out a case with residual primer crimp and mashed primer. OK, 99 rounds.

    But the brownies don't fill the primer feed and powder measure, nor tumble the brass or even unbox the bullets.

    Loading bulk ammo is an ongoing process you just have to keep after. Surge rates are good for advertising and that is about all.
  • RobOzRobOz Member Posts: 9,195 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by perry shooter
    I load 400 + an hour on my star with with FREELOADER+Hulme Case feeder and Brewster indexer along with my designed ejector.[^] But this is with one loading tool as well as using a Star Lubersizer to lube and size Lead bullets. Best machine ever made IMHO like a well tuned BMW compared to a DILLON/YUGO The star powder drop beats ALL others HANDS DOWN[^]


    Ain't got no idea what your talking about, but it sounds a might fancier than my RCBS RC[:D]
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