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Re loaded ammo

I have a question on ammo that I reloaded over the years. Ive been re loading for about 6 years now. Just the other day I was kinda going through and taking inventory on some of my stuff. And I started noticing some of my loaded brass and empty brass was starting to corrode. my loaded stuff was 3-4 years old. I keep everything in a cool dry dark place. the only thing I can think of is the oil/salts from my hands touching it was/is the culprit. was just wondering if anyone has experienced this and what they do to prevent it. I started wearing latex gloves when handling it. I always oil my guns after touching or using it to prevent this, but I don't wanna have to wipe down each piece of brass.

Comments

  • RobOzRobOz Member Posts: 9,538 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I keep most of my bulk reloaded ammo/brass in plastic zip lock bags with a 2"x4" desiccant bag. I then have plastic container that the bags go into. The only time I have a problem is summer time when I'm sitting in a field waiting for a groundhog to pop up. I always have a extra shell or two in my hand and the salt will start to tarnish the brass. The spent brass cleans up fine in the tumbler.
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,346 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Some people have a more corrosive body chemistry than other. After loading I wipe down my ammo while doing the final inspection. Ziploc freezer bags recycled from the kitchen ate what I use. most of the time the bags are placed into a GI ammo can. I still have ammo I loaded back in the 70's, and it's just fine.

    What case lube are you using? I like the Lee stuff in the red and white tube for most but for heavy duty I use the Redding sizing die wax. I hose out my dies with WD-40 often, then dry them with rags.
  • tomcat_blackknightstomcat_blackknights Member Posts: 67 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I usually use that hornady one shot or the Remington case slick. I usually clean the brass in and ultra sonic cleaner then it goes into a tumbler with polish then into a plastic zip lock bag until im ready to reload it. that stuff stays fine. Its seems only the stuff I handle seems to be a problem. I guess I will just have to wipe it down before I store it.
  • MobuckMobuck Member Posts: 12,967 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Some of my reloads get a little dull/tarnished after 8-10 years even with dry pack storage. Doesn't hurt anything-just not as attractive.
  • bpostbpost Member Posts: 32,225 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I get spots of tarnish on some reloads too. Not sure why but I agree it is bothersome to open a can of ammo and see spots of green on the cases.
  • ChetStaffordChetStafford Member Posts: 2,794
    edited November -1
    I tumble my loads for 20-30 minutes after I load them and they are all fine
  • wanted manwanted man Member Posts: 3,276
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by ChetStafford
    I tumble my loads for 20-30 minutes after I load them and they are all fine


    You've surely opened a can of worms with that reply........j/s
  • RobOzRobOz Member Posts: 9,538 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by wanted man
    quote:Originally posted by ChetStafford
    I tumble my loads for 20-30 minutes after I load them and they are all fine


    You've surely opened a can of worms with that reply........j/s


    I know that some manufactures tumble the finished product.

    I only tumble the fired case. I got tired of picking media out of the flash holes. What I do is give my brass a hot water bath after they have been prepped. I then use the shoe rack for the dryer and dry them on low for about 40-60 minutes.
  • victorj19victorj19 Member Posts: 3,643 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by wanted man
    quote:Originally posted by ChetStafford
    I tumble my loads for 20-30 minutes after I load them and they are all fine


    You've surely opened a can of worms with that reply........j/s


    Doubt it. The primers require a hit with a lot more force than a tumbler or vibrating unit could produce. If RN, TCN, FN, wadcutters there's no sharp point.
  • nemesisenforcernemesisenforcer Member Posts: 10,513 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    No clue.

    Never had any of mine corrode but I live in a high and dry climate as it is so it's rarely an issue unless something is left outside.
  • rsnyder55rsnyder55 Member Posts: 2,626
    edited November -1
    I seem to remember a post years ago about tumbling finished shells breaking down the powder particles and changing the pressure of the rounds when they were fired.
  • wanted manwanted man Member Posts: 3,276
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by victorj19
    quote:Originally posted by wanted man
    quote:Originally posted by ChetStafford
    I tumble my loads for 20-30 minutes after I load them and they are all fine


    You've surely opened a can of worms with that reply........j/s


    Doubt it. The primers require a hit with a lot more force than a tumbler or vibrating unit could produce. If RN, TCN, FN, wadcutters there's no sharp point.



    I was referring to the ongoing -and sometimes heated- debate concerning tumbling loaded ammo........
    I have an opinion on the subject, and I'm not foolish enough to express it here........
  • notnownotnow Member Posts: 1,651 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I tumble then size and trim. Next is a hot water and a little dish soap bath and rinse. Next I put them it an open base rack and set them on top of my water heater by the out-flowing line where there's some radiant heat for overnight or a couple days. Then I either load or bag. I've set some out in the open air and they'll start to darken after a year or so.
  • TopkickTopkick Member Posts: 4,452 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by rsnyder55
    I seem to remember a post years ago about tumbling finished shells breaking down the powder particles and changing the pressure of the rounds when they were fired.


    It's an internet myth.
    It goes around like a merry-go-'round.
  • TANK78ZTANK78Z Member Posts: 1,279 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Originally posted by rsnyder55

    "I seem to remember a post years ago about tumbling finished shells breaking down the powder particles and changing the pressure of the rounds when they were fired."

    There is a very simple way imho to see if the myth is true or false for the powder that YOU reload.
    Just take a couple of each of the calibers and loads you reload and put them in your tumbler or vibrating cleaner for 15 to 30 minutes, remove, take each load apart and examine each powder , a close comparison of new unused powder and tumbled powder should give you the correct answer for the powders and load you use.

    The thought that a loaded round will go off while being cleaned seems a little far fetched to me.
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