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hollow base wad cutter

peddlerpeddler Member Posts: 881 ✭✭✭✭
I usually load 2.8g bullseye but was wondering if I could go down to about 2.2 and shoot in a 2" revolver? Thanks

Comments

  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    I take it that this is in a 38 special. Many target shooters use 2.5 BUT be aware it is a fine line between light recoil and getting a bullet stuck in the barrelIF you fire a shot and dont see a hole appear in the target that was not there before the shot make sure you have a empty barrel fom one end to the other if you fire another shot with one still in the barrel then your barrel will be ruined with a goose egg in the middle
  • nmyersnmyers Member Posts: 16,252 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    My old Lyman reloading handbook shows all .38 spec Bullseye loads with a starting powder charge of 2.0 grains.

    HOWEVER, YOU SHOULD ALWAYS RELOAD USING LOADS LISTED IN A RELOADING HANDBOOK FOR SPECIFIC COMPONENTS. ALWAYS STAY WITHIN THE SUGGESTED RANGE.

    Neal
  • dcs shootersdcs shooters Member Posts: 10,969
    edited November -1
    43 Lyman has 2.0-3.0 B-eye
    45 has 1.6-2.0 B-eye
    These are for 148gr.
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,425 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Might have bullet stability/accuracy problems. With a light load, out of a short barreled revolver.

    Recently have been working on light loads, for 45 ACP. With a 152 grain Penn bullet. Although the pistol will function OK, with a 4.5 grain load of AA 2. The bullet is unstable, all over the paper. Finally took to loading 6 grains, to get it to where I'm happy.
  • beantownshootahbeantownshootah Member Posts: 13,137
    edited November -1
    2.2 grains should be fine. I've seen people claim to go as low as 1.5 grains of bullseye (though I wouldn't). I don't think you'll have any issues with that load, but as Perry says, just make sure the bullets are leaving your revolver!

    With loads this weak, you might not bulge/destroy the barrel if you were to get one stuck in there, but there is no reason to take a chance. Even if you don't ruin the barrel this way, knocking out stuck bullets is still a PITA.

    I'd add one more thing. At some point lower velocity starts to reduce accuracy, because when the cartridges have too much empty space in there you may not get consistent powder ignition.

    That's one reason why historically speaking "target" shooters would start their shot ritual by pointing the pistol muzzle upwards towards the sky and lowering it downwards. This was to "settle" the powder to try and get some consistency between shots.
  • jim_lemayjim_lemay Member Posts: 3,166 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Have you ever loaded the 148 HB WC upside down for self defense load inside house?
  • peddlerpeddler Member Posts: 881 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    just loaded 5 but have not shot any yet, I thank they will make a great self defence load at short range.
  • MG1890MG1890 Member Posts: 4,649
    edited November -1
    I guess I have to ask why not just shoot the 2.8 grain charge?

    As far as accuracy, drop the velocity too far and the rifling may not stabilize the bullet.

    Try the 2.2 if you must.... but I don't see the point. Especially for self defense.
  • SP45SP45 Member Posts: 1,725 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Be very careful. 2.7 of bullseye was the standard for many years in PPC with a 148 grain wadcutter. Loaded tens of thousands of them and they work great for what they were intended. Way back in the 70s there were people who kept going lower and lower with the powder charge for reduced recoil. Every once in a while a gun would blow up. Cylinder, top strap and all. Lots of discussion back then about what had happened. The theory back then by the experts was that with so little powder in the case it would lay on the bottom and when ignited by the primer would go off all at once and create an explosion rather than a slow controlled burn. I haven't looked at the loading manuals for that in a long time but as I recall 2.7 was near the low end for powder charge.
  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    HBWC all lead bullet are swaged out of almost pure lead . "VERY SOFT" In testing in Ballistic JELL they expand neally the same
    no matter which direction the exit the barrel pure lead is great
    for staying together not breaking up like high velocity jacketed Rifle ammoI have recovered bunches of 54 cal round ball that was as big as a quarter all one piece. I dont want to sound rude but if you want a short barrel small ULTRA low recoil hand gun on one side and a 500S&W hand cannon as the results on the receiving end GOOD luck ain't going to happen
  • dcs shootersdcs shooters Member Posts: 10,969
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by SP45
    Be very careful. 2.7 of bullseye was the standard for many years in PPC with a 148 grain wadcutter. Loaded tens of thousands of them and they work great for what they were intended. Way back in the 70s there were people who kept going lower and lower with the powder charge for reduced recoil. Every once in a while a gun would blow up. Cylinder, top strap and all. Lots of discussion back then about what had happened. The theory back then by the experts was that with so little powder in the case it would lay on the bottom and when ignited by the primer would go off all at once and create an explosion rather than a slow controlled burn. I haven't looked at the loading manuals for that in a long time but as I recall 2.7 was near the low end for powder charge.


    In the '70,s was two stalls down from a guy shooting a S&W 27 when it blew the top strap off. He either doubled loaded B-eye or had light load. If light, the theory was detonation with powder towards bullet.
    Sure ruined a nice 27 [^]
  • mark christianmark christian Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 22,731 ******
    edited November -1
    Rather than locking it a ten posts, I'll kick it over to the Reloading forum. But don't get the idea that I am no longer the meanest moderator on Gun Broker [;)]
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