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Smith Wesson factory refinish

I've been looking at some of the older smiths.1920s to 1960 era. Is there anything I could look for that might indicate it's not original finish. I know colt put a small mark inside their loading gate.

Comments

  • Hawk CarseHawk Carse Member Posts: 4,296 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    S&W usually but not always stamped a star on guns returned for refinish or repair. Some guns have a three digit date under the grips.
  • dcs shootersdcs shooters Member Posts: 10,969
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Hawk Carse
    S&W usually but not always stamped a star on guns returned for refinish or repair. Some guns have a three digit date under the grips.


    That's if Smith did it.
    Look for sharp edges on the lettering. Polishing will round them if not done right.
  • 1946willys1946willys Member Posts: 42 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I know some manufactures stamped then polished and blued.Others the stamping was the last thing for some markings. I have noticed the smith & wesson logo on the side of the reciever is sometimes proud and sometimes it looks like it was buffed after stamping. Did they change the method of this through the years.
  • machine gun moranmachine gun moran Member Posts: 5,198
    edited November -1
    Smith marked frames, cylinders, and barrels with an 'N' in inconspicuous places prior to applying the plating to new guns. For most of Smith's production, the S&W crest was not stamped until the gun had been otherwise marked, completely polished, and inspected. This left only the crest with standing ('proud') edges. Most amateur refinishes are not undertaken with the guns in assembly, like factory finishes are, which results in rounded edges where frames, sideplates, and yokes all meet.

    And many amateur refinishes are what I refer to as 'reverse refinishes', that is, instead of removing the pits and sharpening the edges, the edges are rounded off and the pits are left in [:D][:D][xx(].
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