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wish I went with Dillon sooner...

Just got an xl650 and dialed it in last night. Switched over from a Hornady LNL AP. Man...big difference in my opinion. Just feels smoother. I love it.
I only did 10 practice rounds after getting dies adjusted and powder worked out...every one came in at exactly 5.3gr, all passed the case guage with flying colors. Ready to rock now.

Comments

  • JohnnylikesgunsJohnnylikesguns Member Posts: 2,885
    edited November -1
    Welcome to the world of BLUE!
  • goldeneagle76goldeneagle76 Member Posts: 4,359
    edited November -1
    Got kids to bed, went down to reloading room and pumped out 100 rds in about 15 mins and that was going slow to check everything going on. I'm not used to being able to actually reload and not have to mess with the press to get it to run. Amazed so far!
  • Mk 19Mk 19 Member Posts: 8,170
    edited November -1
    I have never heard any one say that they shouldn't have bought a Dillon, but almost everyone says that they should have done it sooner.
  • M1A762M1A762 Member Posts: 3,426
    edited November -1
    The Blue Kool-Aid is the best! It is expensive but worth it![:)] Add a bullet feeder and you will spend your savings just feeding the 650.
  • Laredo LeftyLaredo Lefty Member Posts: 13,437 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have the XL650 for rifle and pistol and the 900 or shotgun shells, love'em both. Dillon's superb warranty is unbeatable.
  • goldeneagle76goldeneagle76 Member Posts: 4,359
    edited November -1
    Only had mine for under a month and am already contemplating another. Got to pricing conversions, quick change powder set-up, etc and it was not much cheaper than just getting another xl650 and swapping over the case feeder to whichever machine I am using. So then I will have one set up for large primers and one for small (an extra parts for each). Sold off a gun I never used to fund it so made sense to me!
  • machine gun moranmachine gun moran Member Posts: 5,198
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Mk 19
    I have never heard any one say that they shouldn't have bought a Dillon, but almost everyone says that they should have done it sooner.


    Except me [:)]. I bought a Dillon, and found that it produced poor-quality priming, becuase the hole in the block that accepted the priming ram, was drilled crooked. I went over to Dillon and explained the problem, and the guy at the counter gave me three more blocks, free of charge. Gadzooks! I took them home, and discovered that the holes in all of them were drilled crooked. Having a like for squarely-seated primers, I sold the whole schmear at a loss, and went back to RCBS.
  • gunnut505gunnut505 Member Posts: 10,290
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by machine gun moran
    quote:Originally posted by Mk 19
    I have never heard any one say that they shouldn't have bought a Dillon, but almost everyone says that they should have done it sooner.


    Except me [:)]. I bought a Dillon, and found that it produced poor-quality priming, becuase the hole in the block that accepted the priming ram, was drilled crooked. I went over to Dillon and explained the problem, and the guy at the counter gave me three more blocks, free of charge. Gadzooks! I took them home, and discovered that the holes in all of them were drilled crooked. Having a like for squarely-seated primers, I sold the whole schmear at a loss, and went back


    That sounds suspicious to me; the hole in the sliding primer block is drilled with a drill press, & unless Dillon turned out a few hundred of them before realizing that the drill press was canted (?) out of perpendicular- gotta toss that flag.
  • machine gun moranmachine gun moran Member Posts: 5,198
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by gunnut505
    quote:Originally posted by machine gun moran
    quote:Originally posted by Mk 19
    I have never heard any one say that they shouldn't have bought a Dillon, but almost everyone says that they should have done it sooner.


    Except me [:)]. I bought a Dillon, and found that it produced poor-quality priming, becuase the hole in the block that accepted the priming ram, was drilled crooked. I went over to Dillon and explained the problem, and the guy at the counter gave me three more blocks, free of charge. Gadzooks! I took them home, and discovered that the holes in all of them were drilled crooked. Having a like for squarely-seated primers, I sold the whole schmear at a loss, and went back


    That sounds suspicious to me; the hole in the sliding primer block is drilled with a drill press, & unless Dillon turned out a few hundred of them before realizing that the drill press was canted (?) out of perpendicular- gotta toss that flag.



    Having spent years in a large machine shop, making lathes, balancers, 175mm guns, front-end suspension assembly fixtures for auto makers, and etc, I'm not just off the turnip truck. Sorry to disappoint you.
  • gunnut505gunnut505 Member Posts: 10,290
    edited November -1
    Tossed the flag about selling a Dillon for a loss; your machine shop experience should have allowed you to fix the "crooked" hole.
    Most old metalmen I know would have used the 3 extra primer sliders to solve the misalignment issue.
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