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Shotshell loading

DieHard4DieHard4 Member Posts: 2,373 ✭✭✭✭✭
So I have a lot of federal top gun 12 gauge shells I want to reload. I have determined by reading and listening that they will use the federal gold medal plastic case info in my Lyman book because the same type of case is sold by different names.

But my question is can I load any amount of shot here as listed, or do I have to do what was originally loaded at factory? Mine came with 1 1/8 oz of #8 shot, target load. But there are also loads with the same case using 1 oz, and 7/8 oz. So does the actual oz matter as long as I follow the recipe? And I can see there are other amounts listed as field loads, heavy field, low recoil. I'm thinking I can use any type of load with this case but want to be sure. There are a lot of options if I don't have to do the original target load.

I am also not sure if I can change the #8 shot to another as that is not mentioned here, but guess I have to keep it.

I'm new at this but getting closer.

Comments

  • jonkjonk Member Posts: 10,121
    edited November -1
    So long as you follow a published load for that hull and the primer/wad you choose, you can use any weight shot. That said, some wads will lend themselves to some loads more than others, based on the length and such, and the shot weight you use might impact the wad you choose.
  • MG1890MG1890 Member Posts: 4,649
    edited November -1
    As long as you follow the recipe in the book, shot size does not matter. And yes, as long as you are in the correct casing, a recipe for a 1 oz load can be used in a case that originally held a 1-1/8 oz load, for example.

    Original 1-1/8 oz loaded Winchester AA's can be reloaded with anything from 7/8 oz shot to slug to 1-1/2 oz baby magnums. Buckshot, lead, copper plated. As long as you follow the recipe.
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,346 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Always better to ask questions than to risk your life or limbs and or damage to your firearms.

    It is best to exactly follow the loading data. That means exactly the case, primer, charge weight of powder, wad, charge weight of shot and the crimp specified.

    Components and data are different for steel or lead shot loads.

    Some older primers didn't have sealed cups, dangerous pressures could result if a ball powder was used with them. 209 primers are somewhat different Win, Rem, CCI, best to use what the data calls for.

    When working up new loads, I do at most a box for actual range testing to make sure they function in the firearm before loading up 100's of them.

    My standard load in Win AA's was 3 3/4 DE and 1 1/4 oz. of bird or buck shot. I upped it to 4 DE for the Lyman cast sabot slug.
  • rsnyder55rsnyder55 Member Posts: 2,626
    edited November -1
    Also, if you use a reloading manual, they will list several wad, powder, primer combonations for the hulls. They should also list the pressure and velocities for each load.

    Check them out because different loads will give you the same velocities, but with different pressures.

    In my reloading manual using WinAA hulls, I found a published load that used a powder that gave good velocities with a lower pressure than the other powders listed that is also exceptionally clean.
  • DieHard4DieHard4 Member Posts: 2,373 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    It's nice to know that I have many pages of options instead of just a few. Think I might start with some of the 7/8 oz low recoil loads for practice and saving on shot use. Trying to get the most out of my powder and shot.
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,346 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Light loads will beat you less plus save on powder and shot. Catching dinner perhaps not so much. I find that shooting one load really helps with getting your lead on moving targets easier.
  • jonkjonk Member Posts: 10,121
    edited November -1
    One thing you might find if you go with a lighter load is, the shot column doesn't quite reach the top of the shell. Meaning when you crimp, it caves in. Nothing a little TP won't fix, but it's been my experience with finer shot (say no. 8) and light loads that such is an issue, sometimes. If that happens, as a hillbilly fix, a drop of wax on the top of the shell will do the deed and seal it.
  • rsnyder55rsnyder55 Member Posts: 2,626
    edited November -1
    You may find more light loads for 1oz and 1 1/8oz. I'm not aware of any 7/8oz loads for 12ga, but then I've found a load that works well for me so I have no reason to change.

    One thing I've found helpful is the check not just the pattern but the spread of the load.

    What I used to do is find a large expanse of water and fire the shotgun while swinging it. You should see an even spread without gaps where the shot hits the water. If your pattern shows gaps, then the shot is clumping and whatever you are shooting at could concievable make it through one of the gaps.
  • BikerBobBikerBob Member Posts: 2,765 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I did find some shot with in that past 2 weeks at $39/ 25 lbs. which is down about $5/ bag from what I was paying. So while that's encouraging as far as reloading cost, it still put me at about 2.44/box for just shot at 1&1/8 oz.
    So if I were to drop that to 7/8 oz, it would put it near$1.90/ box for shot.

    That's over a $2 savings on each round of trap. Not insignificant, unless you don't do as well. Has anyone tried reducing the shot weight and still maintained your average?
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,346 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Less powder and shot is usually is done for recoil considerations. There are really good trap and skeet shooter's that could take them all with 1/2 ounce 410 loads.

    I like skeet better than trap and sporting clays even better. I use the range time as practice for real birds. As such I like to use my hunting loads even if they beat me up in one box rather than low power stuff that I could shoulder or hand held shoot all day.
  • Ray BRay B Member Posts: 11,822
    edited November -1
    The TopGun hulls are tube w/paper base construction, which is different from the one piece Gold Medal. I'm not sure what the internal capacity comparison is, but they likely use different loads.
  • dog1944dog1944 Member Posts: 295 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Worked up a 3/4 oz load for the 12ga use the pink 1 oz wad with a 20ga over powder card for a spacer and Clays powder.
    Shoot it in my old hammer guns.
    While I was having chemo I kept shooting and the 1oz loads where hurting, tried some 3/4 oz in my 32" Weatherby SSC and was surprised at the clean breaks I got recoil very soft just used for skeet, shot some good scores
  • asphalt cowboyasphalt cowboy Member Posts: 8,854 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by DieHard4
    I have determined by reading and listening that they will use the federal gold medal plastic case info in my Lyman book because the same type of case is sold by different names.



    I wouldn't lend that any credence if it isn't in a published load manual.
    E-mail the folks at Ballistic Products to see if they have any load recipes for that specific hull.
    http://www.ballisticproducts.com/
    They're more that generous with their help and load info.

    quote:Originally posted by charliemeyer007
    I use the range time as practice for real birds. As such I like to use my hunting loads even if they beat me up


    I'm the same way. Performance in the field is my priority. Nothing compares to knowing how your load is going to perform at any reasonable given range.
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