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reloading

skymanskyman Member Posts: 247 ✭✭✭
I came into possession of a Pacific DL 150 reloader, but it came with no manual, so I have no Idea what order the shot shell must go thru in order to be reloaded, can someone with the same model or the knowledge help me.
Thanks

Comments

  • skymanskyman Member Posts: 247 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    loading data for .308 caliber ftx bullets
  • skymanskyman Member Posts: 247 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Just got some 125 gr slugs for a 30-30 post 1964 Winchester. My data is for 110 or 150 gr loads. I use IMR 4064 powder. Does anyone have data for this type of workup? I bought these when it was impossible to get any type of components. Thanx Obama!
    Any help will be greatly appreciated!!!
    Llama girl
  • skymanskyman Member Posts: 247 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    ok i have read threw the two pages here, didnt find what im looking for, if i go an buy a lee turrent kit, what else would i need beside the dies/powder/tumbler. to get this into operation. from watching the guys on you tube they dont use the little primer cleaner tool, unless they did that before making the videos. also i would buy a digitl scale for powder weigh ups. now i have searched,maybe not under the right keywords, but i have looked for the answers.
  • skymanskyman Member Posts: 247 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have a 40-63 ballard What's best, Black powder or pyrodex?
  • skymanskyman Member Posts: 247 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I am thinking of starting to reload my ammo and I'm wondering what is the best set for the least amount of money.
  • skymanskyman Member Posts: 247 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hello Everyone, I'm Joe. It has been 15 minutes since the last time I reloaded. I have been addicted for 3 years now. When I reload, time stands still. On my days off, I reload. I am obsessed with accuracy and getting that sub MOA at 200 yards for my simple hunting rifle. When I go to bed at night, I think on how to make my bench rest more sturdy and strap my gun in so when I do my ladder at 200 yards, human error is taken out of the equation.

    Someone once told me that I might not be the only one.That there are more out there.

    My name is Joe and I am addicted to reloading.

    [:D]
  • skymanskyman Member Posts: 247 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Would like to know if someone could help with question I have. Thinking about a hornady lock n load ap wondering if I can use the dies I already have or do I have to use hornady dies.THX Ron
  • skymanskyman Member Posts: 247 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I think I have made the decision to get on the reloading band wagon. I'm looking for someone in the nor cal---east of Sacramento area as a tutor. From walking me through the purchase of a dependable set up to educating me on the first run. I have lots of brass--38, 9mm 40, 45, 44, 223 243 308 and soon--44.40. I'm a tactile learner so hands on with a mentor is far more effective to me as opposed to just buying equipment and reading a book. Plus---meeting new people.

    Thanks in advance
    Bret
  • skymanskyman Member Posts: 247 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Tell me about reloading. What do I need to have? Would this cover all of the tools I need? http://www.midsouthshooterssupply.com/item.asp?sku=00005085003
    All I want to reload right now is 40cal and 30-06. How much money can a person save by reloading? How many times can the brass cases be used?
    I'm sure I will think of more questions later.
  • skymanskyman Member Posts: 247 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I want to get into reloading what is the best press to go with. I have heard alot of good about a dillon press??? are they worth the $$$. if so what model
  • skymanskyman Member Posts: 247 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    hello all im thinking about getting into relaoding and i have a few questions
    i want to reload rifle and pistol do i have to get differnt presses or just die?
    and i alos want to load muliple shotgun gauges do i have to get differnt presses or can i get conversions
    and what are the best ones for beginners
    thanks in advance for your time and expertice
  • skymanskyman Member Posts: 247 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I shoot a Marlin guide gun for hunting in 45/70. With the introduction of the 450 with the new pointed ballistic tip bullets, I would like to know if I can use these bullets in my 45/70 reloads.
  • skymanskyman Member Posts: 247 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I am in the process of looking for equipment. I want something that I can reload my rifles as well as my 9mm. Is there one that is better than the other? Any help would be appreciated.
    Ike
  • skymanskyman Member Posts: 247 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I am looking for some help trying to find some lead bb size shot any help would be appreciated
  • noyljnoylj Member Posts: 172 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    First, you have to find a GOOD reloader, then find one who can TEACH.
    Buy a couple of manuals (Hornady is very good and Richard Lee's manual has a lot of information and a large compilation of loading data from various sources) and/or used copies of "Handloading for Handgunners" and "ABCs of Reloading" and see if it makes sense. Don't assume you can't learn by reading and doing.
    Start off very simple.
    For example, years ago I bought a 10" Meade telescope and had a hard time learning how to use it. I then bought a small Meade and learned with it. Then, I sold it and continued on with my 10". Always start as simple as possible.
    If you read some posts, you'll see that most reloaders seem to think that their press is the only good press and their way is the only way. Most had a particular goal in mind (often, action pistol shooting as about their sole reason to reload), and their wants/needs may be quite different from yours.
    Likewise, you can start small, learn the operations, and LEARN what YOUR needs and wants are and not simply be told what they are from someone else.
    For example, just to LEARN, you can buy a $30 Lee Reloading Press (see http://www.midwayusa.com/product/807734/lee-reloader-single-stage-press ), a $15 Lee Ram Prime, a set of dies for one straightwall handgun cartridge (.45 Auto is about the best to start with), a taper or roll crimp die, a powder scale (at least $50), a powder funnel to pour the powder into the case, and a pound of powder, some bullets, and some primers and work through the process at your own rate. I mention the crimp die as I found that seating and crimping in one step made for a complicated die set-up and the results, for me, weren't as good as separating the two steps.
    If you can find them, use the bullet called out in your manual to start with it before branching out to different bullets.
    I still have one of the little Lee Reloading Presses on my bench I use for small jobs, Bulge Busting, and Decapping.
    Bottleneck cases take more effort (for example, they will generally grow with every shooting, so they have to be measured after sizing and trimmed as required. Likewise, the techniques needed for <1 MOA shooting are different than handguns where 12 MOA is doing darn good.
    The process is quite simple with straightwall cases, as they don't grow and you need very little equipment.
    I have used the little Lee press for everything up to .30-06 and the ammo was as good as from any other press--just took a bit more effort.
    After this, you'll have some idea of what features you really want and whether you would like to go a bigger single-stage or even a progressive.
    You can work out the "kinks" in setting up the dies without actually making any loaded rounds.
    Tactile, to me, means hands-on, and that is often best done by yourself.
    If you really think you need someone to walk you through, you should go to a reloading class (check NRA, ranges, and the reloading stores for such) where the art of reloading is discussed and not opinions of manufacturer's equipment.
    Note: .44-40 cases are very thin and easily damaged. Don't start with that cartridge.
  • geeguygeeguy Member Posts: 1,047
    edited November -1
    Skyman: While you can learn by books and trial and error (which is what I did back in the 60's, no internet or Mentor), I think you are taking the right approach. A good Mentor can guide you around the errors, give you the right places to purchase equipment, evaluate "what type" equipment you will need for the long run, and evaluate any problems you may be having. Local availability to "look" at the problem.

    I have done this with numerous new reloaders, most were very successful, and a few failures. Most of the failures were due to the person listening to some gun shop "guy" trying to sell them something or giving them wrong information, then not following the program as we outlined.

    Can be done either way, youtube has great information, there are great forums (like this one), trial and error is a great teacher but most times costly. Your not local to me so I can't help except via email. If you don't get response for someone from this group, try other forums as well.

    Also, NRA runs reloading schools on weekends. I have not been to one, but have met several people who went though the program and seemed to cover all areas except what type equipment to purchase.

    Good luck
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