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Found a good 300 blackout load

bpostbpost Member Posts: 32,664 ✭✭✭✭
Using the 155 grain Lee bullet designed for the 7.62X39 with gas check. It is sized to .308 lubed with alox/beeswax.

The load is 16.3 grains of RE7 with any Standard SR primer I have at the time. All the cases are reclaimed military cut down with necks turned. This load is shooting 2" or so groups at 100 yards and is pie plate accurate at 200 yards. It can get expensive shooting jacketed bullets in the 300AAC so having a cast load that works the action and is still reasonably accurate is a real money saver. Save more money, shoot more often!

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    charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 6,579 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    +1 Every firearm I have that I can load for has a cast bullet load for trigger time and fire forming.

    Second it's very handy to be able to harvest small game for camp meat with a much quieter round that usually leaves enough to actually find than a full tilt cannon rounds.
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    MobuckMobuck Member Posts: 13,790 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    How much lead, bullet lube, and other associated crud is going to end up in an AR gas system?
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    bpostbpost Member Posts: 32,664 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Mobuck
    How much lead, bullet lube, and other associated crud is going to end up in an AR gas system?


    None as far as I can tell. Everything cleaned right up after 90 rounds with no leading or lube in the gas tube. I just fired 5 rounds of 125 grain jacketed to see if there was any issue, you had me worrying about it; none was noted, the gun functioned as it should.
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    MobuckMobuck Member Posts: 13,790 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I don't intend to use cast lead in my 300 but did sort of wonder if that would be a problem.
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    bpostbpost Member Posts: 32,664 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Mobuck
    I don't intend to use cast lead in my 300 but did sort of wonder if that would be a problem.

    If you keep a "properly sized" (key words) cast bullet under 2,000 FPS it will not lead your clean bore. Since this load is going well under that number the chances of lead in the gas tube or lead in the barrel is truly minimal. I would be happy to send you a few cast bullets to try if you email me your addy. bpost58@fronter.com

    I need an excuse to go out to the shed and cast some more and any excuse is a good excuse. [:D]
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    M1A762M1A762 Member Posts: 3,426
    edited November -1
    Are you using wheel weight or a harder alloy? Air cooled or water dropped? Are you just belling the case mouth or using a Lyman M die to prevent shaving the bullet when seating? Have you considered powder coating your cast .300 bullets?

    I am getting a dillon trimmer, 300 blk tool head and trim die to convert 5.56 brass to .300 soon. I also cast bullets for my handguns, so I will be casting for the .300 blk soon enough. I have an AR15 SBR and plan on suppressing a 9" barreled .300 upper for it.

    Cast bullets mean more trigger time![:)]
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    bpostbpost Member Posts: 32,664 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I use wheel weights with a dash of linotype just because I have it. My RCBS pro melt hold 20 pounds and the wag is about a pound of lino added per pot. I just air cool them size to .308 with a gas check.

    I use the Lee universal belling die to open the mouth just enough to accept the bullet base to the top of the gas check.

    Before you learn the hard way, like I did, you will need to neck turn the trimmed 223 cases. If you don't turn them you will not be able to chamber about 20% of your loaded rounds because the neck diameter exceeds the chamber diameter, this is NOT a good situation.

    What that means is
    (1) cut the 223 case down with your handy dandy chop saw from Amazon.com
    (2) size in 300 blackout die as normal.
    (3) trim to final length (I use the WFT trimmer in a chuck driven by an electric motor and love it)
    (4) open the neck up to accept neck turning mandrel.
    (5) turn the necks making sure to take a "bite" out of the neck shoulder junction.
    (6) resize neck to hold bullets properly.
    (7) remove military crimp,
    (8) prime and load as normal.

    As you can tell making cases is a time consuming affair. I can watch several John Wayne war movies just processing a coffee can full of empty 223 brass into 300 AAC Blackout.

    I got my powdervalleyinc.com shipment of 1680 in last week. I am looking forward to trying it in several loads for the 300 AAC. It seems to offer the greatest MV of just about any powders listed.

    I love cast bullets in rifles out to 200 yards. The fun factor is off the chart and leaving lots of money in my pocket is icing on the cake.
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    M1A762M1A762 Member Posts: 3,426
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by bpost
    I use wheel weights with a dash of linotype just because I have it. My RCBS pro melt hold 20 pounds and the wag is about a pound of lino added per pot. I just air cool them size to .308 with a gas check.

    I use the Lee universal belling die to open the mouth just enough to accept the bullet base to the top of the gas check.

    Before you learn the hard way, like I did, you will need to neck turn the trimmed 223 cases. If you don't turn them you will not be able to chamber about 20% of your loaded rounds because the neck diameter exceeds the chamber diameter, this is NOT a good situation.

    What that means is
    (1) cut the 223 case down with your handy dandy chop saw from Amazon.com
    (2) size in 300 blackout die as normal.
    (3) trim to final length (I use the WFT trimmer in a chuck driven by an electric motor and love it)
    (4) open the neck up to accept neck turning mandrel.
    (5) turn the necks making sure to take a "bite" out of the neck shoulder junction.
    (6) resize neck to hold bullets properly.
    (7) remove military crimp,
    (8) prime and load as normal.

    As you can tell making cases is a time consuming affair. I can watch several John Wayne war movies just processing a coffee can full of empty 223 brass into 300 AAC Blackout.

    I got my powdervalleyinc.com shipment of 1680 in last week. I am looking forward to trying it in several loads for the 300 AAC. It seems to offer the greatest MV of just about any powders listed.

    I love cast bullets in rifles out to 200 yards. The fun factor is off the chart and leaving lots of money in my pocket is icing on the cake.


    Thanks for the info! I have watched youtube videos about trimming and necking 5.56 brass into .300 brass with the Dillon RT1500 trimmer and trim die. It looks to be a quick proccess. I already have the Dillon 650 so I am going to get the trimmer and die.

    I don't think I will need to gas check the cast bullets for subsonics unless a leading issue happens, but I doubt it.
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    bpostbpost Member Posts: 32,664 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by M1A762

    I don't think I will need to gas check the cast bullets for subsonics unless a leading issue happens, but I doubt it.




    You may be okay with a plain based bullet but shooting a bullet designed for a gas check bare butt might gas cut a bit. Only testing will show any issues. Good luck keep us posted!!
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