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I am not sure , but I might have picked up a bad..

ArbyArby Member Posts: 668
habit.

I hadn't been to the range in a while and all my shots were in a tight 3-4 inch group they were low and to the right at 7 o'clock 4 inches of center.

I am right handed and am shooting a new Springfield 1911...indications are, I could be flinching...I have too much finger on the trigger or it might just be the pistol...I really doubt it is the pistol.

Any ideas to fix flinching?

Comments

  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,348 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Shoot more, nothing beats actual practice. Shoot something with way worse recoil - then your 1911 will seem like kitten. Have someone load a few dummy rounds in your magazines randomly - flinching will be apparent when the hammer drops on a dummy.

    Wear good ear and eye protection, perhaps even a glove without the finger tips (bicycle rider type). Weight training for your arms by holding out at least a 5# weight for as long as you can at a time.

    Use both hands.

    Have someone else that is a good shot try your pistol and ammo/
  • ArbyArby Member Posts: 668
    edited November -1
    Thanks Charlie for you response ...

    I was thinking about getting one of the pistolaros at the range to run a couple of clips through the pistol.

    I am not noticing any dips in the front sight during dry firing exercises so I may try having someone put a couple of dummy rounds in the clip...sounds like a good idea ...that would clearly demonstrate flinching.

    I use both hands and since I have big hands I sometime get hammer bite and I use a fingerless glove... weight training isn't an issue but I do play with the 8# weights.

    Thanks again.
  • ArbyArby Member Posts: 668
    edited November -1
    Went back to the range today, put 200 rounds through the pipe and I am happy to say there were no indications of flinching...everything in the 10 ring...[:)]
  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    Hello one of the best teachers is your self with help from a friend all of us tend to flinch at some time but we don't see the flinch ourselves do this take a friend to the range with your pistol and ammo along with some snap caps dummy ammo some you make yourself if you reload or buy them,now get your friend to load the magazines with mixed live &dummy rounds Then you shoot that magazine when you get to a dummy round Both you & your friend will now see the flinch When you get so the pistol does not move when you try to fire a dummy round then you will also see the true group Size you and the pistol can shoot Practice this yourself put a coin on top of slide and dry fire if the coin falls off when you pull the trigger you are flinching
  • TfloggerTflogger Member Posts: 3,056 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Anyone with a smartphone can video you while shooting.
    Might show any bad habits.
  • ArbyArby Member Posts: 668
    edited November -1
    I went through many dry fire exercises after my first trip to the range and noticed that I was not used to the trigger creep. I went through many repetitions dry firing and finally got a feel for the trigger.

    Prior to acquiring the 1911, I had been shooting a Springfield XD which had a totally different trigger feel, so that may have had something to do with my 7 o'clock groupings during my first trip to the range.

    In any case, I went back to the range and had the range instructor observe what I was doing...he didn't observe any flinching and after a sigh of relief I settled down putting everything in the 10 ring...Very glad, since flinching is hard as hell to cure. His recommendation was to continue the dry fire exercises , especially prior to going to the range.

    Thanks for your input.

    Corrected a brain fart
  • iceracerxiceracerx Member Posts: 8,808 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Arby
    I went through many dry fire exercises after my first trip to the range and noticed that I was not used to the trigger creep. I went through many repetitions dry firing and finally got a feel for the trigger.

    Prior to acquiring the 1911, I had been shooting a Glock XD which had a totally different trigger feel, so that may have had something to do with my 7 o'clock groupings during my first trip to the range.

    In any case, I went back to the range and had the range instructor observe what I was doing...he didn't observe any flinching and after a sigh of relief I settled down putting everything in the 10 ring...Very glad, since flinching is hard as hell to cure. His recommendation was to continue the dry fire exercises , especially prior to going to the range.

    Thanks for your input.




    Where can I get me one O' them Glock XDs?
  • ArbyArby Member Posts: 668
    edited November -1
    Sorry about...Had a brain fart or a Senior Moment...should have said
    Springfield XD.

    I will correct it...
  • 243winxb243winxb Member Posts: 258 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote: low and to the right at 7 o'clock 4 inches of center.

    I was thinking pushing with the thumb. I dont let my thumb touch the 1911 when shooting 1 handed.

    Glad your back in the 10 ring. The X is next. [:)]
    [url] https://saami.org [/url]
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