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Going progressive

CubsloverCubslover Member Posts: 18,601 ✭✭
As some of you know. I've been reloading for about a year now. Using the good ole Lee single stage.

I've put together over 1000rds. I love every minute of it, but can't get the motivation to head downstairs and load up some more.

Takes me about an hour to load 100rds.

As some of you also know I traded off the Mazda Miata I had. I kept the aftermarket wheels and tires, and am planning on selling them. I figure I could get $400-500 out of em. I was thinking about putting that money into my reloading setup. Thinking of a Dillon Square Deal "B", or a Lee Pro 1000. Both are the "Poor man's special", but I just want to get my feet wet.

I reload 40 S&W, 44Mag/Spl, 357Mag/38Spl, thinking about doing some 9mm.

I reload my 40 with Alliant Bullseye, which is way too dirty. I'll probably buy some Unique, Power Pistol to try different loads with. I use H110 for the 357/44. I only reload a couple hundred rounds of them. I thought about getting some Alliant Herco, 2400, and AA#9 to try some pet loads with.

With that $400-500 I get I can buy a Dillon with the different caliber conversions, and that's about it. Or I could buy the Lee Pro and restock my supplies with multiple different powders, bullets, buy more cases and primers. And also pick up some lead bullets for plinking.

Dillon's Blue Press Magazine shows the Square "B" for $320. Is that pretty much the going rate? Buying the Lee will give me much more money to stock up with. As it is I only have a few hundred bullets and 2lbs of powder on hand. I'd like to load up so I can put together multiple different loads to take to the range and see how they perform.

I'll probably keep the single stage in case I pick up a 223, 243, or similar bolt gun so I can put together some good(match) rounds.

For the money(I know Dillon has a lifetime warranty) which is the better deal. Taking into consideration the ability for me to stock up on supplies as well. I'll only load a couple thousand rounds a year.
Any other powders I should try with these loads? Hodgdon Clays, Longshot, Lil Gun, etc?

Long winded I know, sorry.

Thanks in advance.
Half of the lives they tell about me aren't true.

Comments

  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    Go with the dillon because of the CUSTOMER SUPPORT.
  • MIKE WISKEYMIKE WISKEY Member, Moderator Posts: 9,751 ******
    edited November -1
    "Go with the dillon because of the CUSTOMER SUPPORT."... +1
  • iceracerxiceracerx Member Posts: 8,872 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    "Go with the dillon because of the CUSTOMER SUPPORT."... +2

    If you go with the Square "B" holler. I have the 9mm dies and you can have them.
  • iceracerxiceracerx Member Posts: 8,872 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:I'll only load a couple thousand rounds a year.


    If this is truly the case, you don't really need a progressive press.

    I suggest you save your money. Or think about a Lyman T-Mag II Turret Press @ $189.85. This is a single stage press with a turret head that takes all of the dies. Extra heads are offered so you can set up one set of dies per each head. This makes set up a snap.

    http://www.lymanproducts.com/lymanproducts/index.htm

    EDIT: Extra benefit is that you don't have to replace all of your dies.
  • temblortemblor Member Posts: 2,153 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The Dillon is a much better and more reliable machine with better customer support if you should ever need it. The Lee is harder to get set up and will give more problems sooner or later.
    You might also look at the RCBS progressive unit. It loads good ammo and is very easy to change calibers on, etc.
    Good Luck...............[^].
  • dclocodcloco Member Posts: 2,967
    edited November -1
    You don't need a progressive as racerx pointed out.

    I reload nearly 4500-5500 rounds per year...and still go single stage.

    Exception, as racerx pointed out, go with a turret press. I have an older Lyman 6 hole that currently handles 17 Rem, 204 Ruger, & 223.

    Spend your money that will decrease your brass prep time.

    Rule #1 at my reloading bench, NEVER leave dirty brass. When I come home from range or prairie doggin', the tumbler is on. Walk away for a couple hours...to clean brass.

    If I spend 45 minutes and prep 50-100 brass every other day or two...I keep up with my shooting.

    You are dreading this because it seems like a chore..start to finish. Divide it up and go.

    quote:Originally posted by iceracerx
    quote:I'll only load a couple thousand rounds a year.


    If this is truly the case, you don't really need a progressive press.

    I suggest you save your money. Or think about a Lyman T-Mag II Turret Press @ $189.85. This is a single stage press with a turret head that takes all of the dies. Extra heads are offered so you can set up one set of dies per each head. This makes set up a snap.

    http://www.lymanproducts.com/lymanproducts/index.htm

    EDIT: Extra benefit is that you don't have to replace all of your dies.
  • CubsloverCubslover Member Posts: 18,601 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Maybe I will go with a Turret then.
    Half of the lives they tell about me aren't true.
  • dclocodcloco Member Posts: 2,967
    edited November -1
    I thought long and hard about going progressive, but, the money of buying seperate this and that for the 10+ calibers that I reload for did not make sense....when I considered the volume that I load each year.

    FYI - I picked up the Lyman turret at a gunshow for $30.

    I am not cheap...just watch what I spend. ...and buy the best that I can.

    Of note, with that old Lyman turrent, loaded round runout is hovers in the 0.0008" range...yes...LESS than one thousandths. No bull...I have checked this multiple rounds.
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