.

Choosing Right Recoil Spring for 1911

03lover03lover Member Posts: 67 ✭✭
When working up different loads for the 1911 style 45 ACP auto loader quite often the recoil spring has to be matched to the load for best performance and to insure you don't batter the slide and frame.

I have heard the best way to match the right recoil spring to the load is to start out with one that should be plenty heavy enough and if the pistol doesn't cycle properly, go to the next lighter rated spring. Continue this procedure until the pistol cycles properly with that load.

I shoot a lot more light and mid-range loads than I do heavy ones.

Is the procedure I noted above correct or are there other ways to choose the right spring to match a given load.

Comments

  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    You have the basic Idea correct IMHO . I think the fastest way is the one shot test. IE take a heavy spring and load one shot in the magazine. shoot the round and most likely the slide will not stay back "short recoil". Decrease the spring weight until this test results in the slide locking back "Full CYCLE" I shoot Light Bulls-Eye pistol loads and during a 2700 the first rounds if I don't use a brass catcher will land about 4 ft behind and to the right of me by the end of the day they are only about 2 foot away . I can tell if I start to RAG-ARM because the empty brass will just clear the pistol. Be aware that different people grip the pistol harder and have different body mass so the correct spring for one shooter may not be the best choice for another shooter. If this is a carry gun you want to go with slightly weaker spring then the above test. DON'T CLIP COILS ON SPRINGS AND DON'T USE RECOIL BUFFERS!!!! "PRAISE THE HARD-BALL GUN"
  • geeguygeeguy Member Posts: 1,047
    edited November -1
    I concur with Perryshooter. I use a one shot method. I find that even the same weight spring purchased for different guns and the same load do not always function the same. And Perryshooter is right, the shooter will make a great difference. My local gunsmith and I shoot together and I have small hands/wrists and frame, he has large everything. My selection of springs seems to always be about a 1 lb. difference (lighter) then his.
    The deal on the buffer is that many competition shooters feel that the buffer may break, thus now changing the function of the gun, thus losing points, ie; no buffers. Cutting the springs is not recommended (I do it all the time)as it can create functional problems if cut so short it does not properly engage both ends.

    There are also several spring mechanisms that allow a 1911 to function with various loads. Karl, if you are reading this, who is the guy at Perry (corner building, starts with an "S")that makes that system and what is your opinion?

    I get two springs to work with each competition gun so I have a spare for just that given gun and load.


    Best of luck
  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    Hello I shop Big time at Perry at Champions Choice, Champions Shooters Supply, Fur Fin & Feather and of course visit High Standard and Springfield for free food and drink . I can't place who you are thinking of on the end building I though that was custom EAR plugs and scope mounts.As far as buffers It is my feeling that they restrict the length of the recoil and This will lessen the time the slide is back allowing the cartridge to pop up to be in proper position for the round to feed into the barrel and also this same problem will not allow the slide stop pin to fully rise after last shot and it will in time peen the slide stop notch in the slide. This does not happen over night but after many rounds .. I build my own match pistols and don't like fitting new slides to frames. My #1 Wad gun has over 250,000 rounds through it I have seen shooters with 10,000 rounds shooting Buffers have to replace their slide . The reason I don't like cutting coils is I shoot a Heavy Gilmore Red Dot and it is slide mounted again IMHO this dictates a fairly light spring and I think even a light full length has more closing force when chambering a round then a cut stronger spring. On top of this Cut springs Give more vertical stringing out of a Ransom rest then a full length light spring.Your mileage may vary "Praise the Hard-Ball Gun"
  • geeguygeeguy Member Posts: 1,047
    edited November -1
    Perryshooter:
    Karl - thanks for the information even if this isn't my thread. I did not know the extra information on the buffers, I don't use them, and your explaination makes good sense.

    The spring component is a "sprinsel" (I know that's not quite right).
    1st building looking east to west on the right. Next to the ear plug guys, has several unique 1911 components. I'll check on Sunday 7/8 and try to remember to put it in this thread.
  • geeguygeeguy Member Posts: 1,047
    edited November -1
    Several items:
    1. Try a "Springco" product. This is a progressive style "drop in" spring system that allows different loads to be used without damage to the slide or receiver. Can deliver more "felt" recoil with heavy loads I am told. Find them on the web.

    2. Progressive springs from Wolf. Here again, you have to try your load range to find the right combination. Spring progressively becomes heavier as the slide comes back.

    Best of luck.
  • PearywPearyw Member Posts: 3,699
    edited November -1
    I have converted most of my 1911s to use the flat type coil spring used in Glocks. I buy ISMI flat springs in various weights. Most of my standard 5" 1911s have 17# for 45acp and 40 S&W. I go to 22# in my 10mm. I usually use a full length guide rod and plug that I have fabricated in the smaller diameter that is required for the flat springs. ISMI springs last about 50,000 rounds unlike coil springs that need to be replaced about every 3000 rounds.
  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    I know everyone has their favorite spring And I would stay with what works for you . However it is my feeling that round wire springs have 2 advanages over square less friction on the recoil guide then a sharp square edge and less chance to breakage all high stress machine parts have radius not sharp 90 degree cuts.As far as life span if the spring is proper length and good quality and not compressed past it's limit it should last a life time for most shooters. I have a wolff spring in my match pistol that is 20 + years old 5,0000 - 7,500 rounds a year. It still tests within 4 oz of when new . Your mileage may vary.
Sign In or Register to comment.