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powder, primers, live ammo, & temperature changes

I think I read somewhere that drastic temperature changes is bad for these things. Is it bad to leave the powder, primers, and live ammo in a place where the temperature changes drastically? Right now I reload in the garage where it gets real hot during the day and real cold at night. I don't have room in the house for reloading, but might be able to find room to store powder, primers, and live ammo. Is this something I need to worry about or does it not really matter?

Comments

  • shooter93shooter93 Member Posts: 322 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I'd store them inside but if your using them with out a prolongd storage I seriously doubt you'd have trouble with them. Powder cans are well sealed and primers too are sealed against moisture.
  • mrbrucemrbruce Member Posts: 3,374
    edited November -1
    All those things need to be stored in a cool dry place if at all posssible.
    All that aside, temperture changes are more of a problem during actual shooting than at any other time.

    Gun control is hitting what your aiming at.
  • gunnut505gunnut505 Member Posts: 10,290
    edited November -1
    I live in the stinkin' desert of New Mexico, and have been reloading almost 30 years. Heat will cause deterioration of your powder if you store it for more than a year or two, and constant heat/cold cycling will make some of your primers start to misfire after about 2 years.
    I store my powder in the Northernmost room, on the floor, in a big metal magazine. Primers are always kept on the lowest shelf in the guest room under the window.
    Loaded ammo should not be kept in your trunk, glove compartment, or pocket full of change. When your loaded ammo gets hot, or spends a lot of time bouncing around in your car; the powder tends to break into even smaller pieces, which creates more surface area, which will cause pressure increases. Important if you're using near-max loads.

    Check your powder regularly; if it starts to smell like ammonia instead of acetone; pour it into a small series of piles (outside!) and toss matches at it.
    Primers are a different story; when the "pill" inside the primer cup turns a lighter or darker color, it indicates a chemical change, and is no longer reliable.

    "Qui non est hodie cras minus aptus erit" --OVID
  • JustCJustC Member, Moderator Posts: 16,038 ******
    edited November -1
    Vaccume seal the primers, that's how I store large lots of both powder and primers. I take out what I need and reseal them. An old non-working fridge makes a great powder storage box with it's door seal as well.

    why chase the game when the bullet can get em from here?....
    Got Balistics?
  • Colonel PlinkColonel Plink Member Posts: 16,460
    edited November -1
    When your loaded ammo gets hot, or spends a lot of time bouncing around in your car; the powder tends to break into even smaller pieces, which creates more surface area, which will cause pressure increases. Important if you're using near-max loads

    That's just good to know. Chalk up another "never thought of that" moment. Thanks.

    "When the going gets weird, the Weird turn pro"
    Hunter S. Thompson"
  • mowartmowart Member Posts: 1,392 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Smokeless powder is inherently unstable and will degrade over time producing heat, moisture and acid. It is heat, moisture and acid which accelerates this breakdown. When smokeless was first invented late 19th century, there was a problem with barrels of the stuff blowing up. The problem was mostly solved when buffers were finally mixed in with the powder. As the powder degrades, the buffers take care of the moisture and acid. But after the buffers are used up, the decomposition accelerates. This is why, even if available, WW I surplus ammo is unshootable in most cases.

    Gunpowder on the other hand is not inherently unstable. If kept dark, cool and dry old black powder ammo will shoot and a Civil War cannonball can kill or maim the fool trying to disarm it. (Here in VA, we have this happen every few years.)
  • jimbowbyjimbowby Member Posts: 3,496
    edited November -1
    [8D]--It's like a refrigerator, if you lose power for 24/48 hrs and DON"T open it's OK-- if you store powders and primers in low --generaly cool areas,they stay COOL, just plan ahead for withdrawal--[:(][}:)][:p][:D]

    I'm only wearing Black untill they make something darker
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