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over priced @ reloading shop?? HELP!!!!!!

hey guys I'm getting into shooting reloads for the chance to tune my loads and to save money since weatherby is so pricey. It's all new to me and there isn't too many places to go for reloading in my area,so lets hear from you other shooters.What r u paying for reloading ,if it's your brass?? My shop is $28.00 for a box.I will eventually get a press to reload my and my sons rounds.

Comments

  • Tailgunner1954Tailgunner1954 Member Posts: 7,815
    edited November -1
    I do my own reloading, that way I know what I have.
  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    Scott I never shoot someone else reloads I say get a press and load your own AFTER READING up on the subject
  • brier-49brier-49 Member Posts: 6,734 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Start shopping online, Midway, Natchezz, Midsouth Shooters Supply. All componets are going up in price like crazy. If you shoot at an organized range start checking the brass barrel.
  • jonkjonk Member Posts: 10,121
    edited November -1
    What caliber? How many rounds? Loaded with???

    Could be a bargain or a rip off- don't know without that info. But I second it- I would not shoot someone else's reloads unless I trusted them with my life as that is what you are doing. So yes, I'd shoot my dad's reloads, as I trust him with my life; while I taught HIM reloading (he had never done it) he was a good pupil. [;)] That's about it.
  • HandgunHTR52HandgunHTR52 Member Posts: 2,735
    edited November -1
    Having seen your post on the Ask the Experts forum, I know that you shoot a .300 Weatherby Mag. I also know that the $28.00 per box price is with you providing the brass.
    That being said, if you provide the brass (which is the most expensive part) the rest of the load costs about $0.50 per round ($10 per box). That means that you are paying about $18.00 per box over what you would pay if you loaded your own. The caveat here is that it will cost you about $150-$200 to buy a decent set-up to do it yourself. So, if you plan on shooting more than 11 boxes of ammo, it would be cost effective for you load your own. If not, then let the shop do it for you.
    However, I do agree that I would have a hard time shooting reloads from someone else. I would have to know them pretty well and have seen their operation before trusting them.
  • sandwarriorsandwarrior Member Posts: 5,453 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    guys,

    I've been e-mailing scott on this issue. I tend to agree that if it was some joe off the block I would have a hard time shooting his reloads. It sounds like this shop does it regularly[?]. For the price they are charging it isn't all that unreasonable considering the ATF fee to start selling re-manned ammo and the insurance to CYA in case you do make a mistake.

    Scott,

    Like handgun said, boil down how much you want to shoot and then decide if it's cost effective to go to the shop or buy your own setup. I've never ever regretted buying my own RCBS Rockchucker master reloading kit.
  • flyingtorpedoflyingtorpedo Member Posts: 1,301 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If you are planning on reloading for you and you family, I'd get a few books, read up and buy a press. What better time than now to start with everything getting so expensive. I just loaded my first rounds a few days ago (still haven't shot them yet [V]) and it is rather simple and straight foward. And like HandgunHTR52, and Sandwarrior said, it won't take long to pay for itself. Don't be afraid to ask a "stupid" question. The kind folks on GB will give you an answer. I've asked more than one and I'm sure I'll have more too.
  • scrubberguyscrubberguy Member Posts: 219 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Scott:
    It's a rare day I shoot ammo made by someone else. When I was shooting IPSC in the 70's with three other guys I did buy ammo made by a supplier to the league and if memory serves me we payed $75.00 a 1000 for 45 auto loaded to Major spec's. It was a lot easier to spring for that when we divided it 3 ways.

    Had the league not given this guy it's blessings, plus he was loading for 4 of the top shooters in the nation, I would never have purchased from him. Having said that you cannot expect anybody to sell a product at a loss.

    So decide how much your gonna shoot, then figure 200 to get set up to reload, and then subtract the cost of "expected" rounds to be fired from the cost to set up for reloading!

    This will tell you if you want to buy "ready mades" or "roll your own".

    One other thing to consider: anything with metal in it is going up and fast! The price you pay today will not be the price you pay tomorrow!

    I suggest you ante up for the reloading gear! Because long range costs are going to kill all of us![8D]
  • TopkickTopkick Member Posts: 4,452 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    My Lee/Hornaday setup has been paid for in only 3 months.

    I like it a lot and load almost every weekend.

    I load .223 and .243 so far....

    I have been collecting RCBS dies and more accessories and am having a great time doing so.

    I bought the dies and such here on Gunbroker.
    And brass, while it's affordable.

    Check BHavin's auctions .
    He's a great guy and offers lots of info.
  • Jim the PA HunterJim the PA Hunter Member Posts: 87 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    [:)]Hi Scott,

    I'm new to the forum but I must tell you that I have been reloading my own for over 40 years. I would not shoot anyone else's loads unless I knew them for years AND I was there helping them to make the ammo. I've tag-teamed allot of hunting/shooting relatives and buddies over the years making all kinds of ammo. If you have a friend that's been into loading awhile, I'd ask him/her if you could observe their next loading session. You can learn allot from an experienced reloader. Maybe your son would be interested in reloading with you? Dad, (he's 84 now), and I started when I was 14 years old. I remember paging through the Herters Catalogs for reloading goodies!

    It takes time to reload. It's a task that will produce great results if you take care of proper technique. Get some books on reloading and read them front to back!

    Learn about taking care of your brass. Cleaning, sizing, trimming, primer pocket cleaning, and above all learn the signs of high pressures, weak cases, cracked cases, and signs of improper sizing/seating or excess lubrication.

    Learn about primers, powder and their burn rates, bullet seating depth, proper equipment setup, etc.

    I must say Scott that even though it sounds like allot to take in, you will enjoy the task so much more when you start shooting fantastic groups. Nothing like a plan coming together!

    BTW: MidwayUSA and Midsouth are two great places to find what you need. I'm sure there are others out there and you could probably find them with a Google search.

    Don't be afraid to take the plunge, especially when there are forums like this one where you can pick the brains of thousands of experienced reloaders. If anyone spouts out a no-no that contradicts known loading criteria [:I], someone or should I say many members will shout to the high heavens [:0] telling you NO- don't do it! AND they will tell you why not to do it. [:D]

    Read the books and ask questions! Above all... have fun shoot'n!
  • flyingtorpedoflyingtorpedo Member Posts: 1,301 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Scott,
    Also check out http://www.wideners.com/, they have some of the best prices I've found. I got my press kit delivered for what midway wanted for the same one. You may want to stop by a local book store to look at a reloading book. You can flip through it and it will give you an idea on if you want to load your own or not. I did that before I decided to get into it. But do NOT buy the book there as chances are it will be much cheaper from midway or wideners, even with the shipping. I thought that the ABC's of Reloading 7th Edition and The Lyman 48th Reloading Handbook went together well. Where one glossed over something the other explained in detail. I also got Lee's Modern Reloading 2nd Edition which I liked as well. Hope I helped.
  • FrancFFrancF Member Posts: 35,278 ******
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Jim the PA Hunter

    [:)]Hi Scott,

    I'm new to the forum but I must tell you that I have been reloading my own for over 40 years. I would not shoot anyone else's loads unless I knew them for years AND I was there helping them to make the ammo. I've tag-teamed allot of hunting/shooting relatives and buddies over the years making all kinds of ammo. If you have a friend that's been into loading awhile, I'd ask him/her if you could observe their next loading session. You can learn allot from an experienced reloader. Maybe your son would be interested in reloading with you? Dad, (he's 84 now), and I started when I was 14 years old. I remember paging through the Herters Catalogs for reloading goodies!

    It takes time to reload. It's a task that will produce great results if you take care of proper technique. Get some books on reloading and read them front to back!

    Learn about taking care of your brass. Cleaning, sizing, trimming, primer pocket cleaning, and above all learn the signs of high pressures, weak cases, cracked cases, and signs of improper sizing/seating or excess lubrication.

    Learn about primers, powder and their burn rates, bullet seating depth, proper equipment setup, etc.

    I must say Scott that even though it sounds like allot to take in, you will enjoy the task so much more when you start shooting fantastic groups. Nothing like a plan coming together!

    BTW: MidwayUSA and Midsouth are two great places to find what you need. I'm sure there are others out there and you could probably find them with a Google search.

    Don't be afraid to take the plunge, especially when there are forums like this one where you can pick the brains of thousands of experienced reloaders. If anyone spouts out a no-no that contradicts known loading criteria [:I], someone or should I say many members will shout to the high heavens [:0] telling you NO- don't do it! AND they will tell you why not to do it. [:D]

    Read the books and ask questions! Above all... have fun shoot'n!



    +1[^] Sage advice
    quote:I would not shoot anyone else's loads unless I knew them for years AND I was there helping them to make the ammo.
  • HandLoadHandLoad Member Posts: 15,998
    edited November -1
    Go to a gun show, or ask around at your local shooting club - look in the pennysaver or greensheet in your area - often, you can get a good press and some dies and other stuff from someone who is getting out of the hobby, or from an estate sale. Often you will pay less than half of what you would before shipping on new stuff.

    Pawn shops sometimes get stuff in, and it is hard for them to sell it. I got my Dillon SDB for FREE, from a Pawnbroker - it was broken and was missing parts - they gave it to me. I called Dillon to buy the parts needed, and they wouldn't hear of it - they sent me all the updated parts and manual, for FREE.

    Giveaways and brass for sale here on GB can give you lotsa cheap fodder for your reloading.

    Folks at my Gunclub have sometimes just "HAD" to have some new gun or such, and sold me unopened cans of powder at less than half price. Brass, too.

    If you are friendly with the Range Officer at your local range, you can pick up brass for free. Some ranges will let you "mine" the lead from the backstops, (if you leave them repaired) - this can help you cast new bullets.
  • coloman1954coloman1954 Member Posts: 19 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    i clean up the local county range and find a lot of fired one time brass. i use it to reload for hunting and just plain fun .
    if you want a good set up i found some on craigs list ebay and this site too. first of all shop around and see what you would pay for new and then go and find it used and you could pick it up for 1/2 price . and definately go to the local range and pick up all the brass you can you can always trade it to get the caliber you want to reload . ya im a scrounger but the two calf elk i shot this last season are tender as hell and taste better than that ol cow my brother shot. you can ask me any question you want i reload 300 win mag 30:06, 223rem i have 10 boxes of each and over 300 rounds of 233 its fun and passes the time
    [email protected]
  • Shootist3006Shootist3006 Member Posts: 4,171
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by brier-49
    .... If you shoot at an organized range start checking the brass barrel.


    If you plan to shoot anything hotter than low-powered practice loads (and even then for most rifle loads) avoid 'range' brass. Picking up strange brass and putting it in your gun is a lot like picking up a used lollipop on the street and putting it in your mouth[xx(]
  • dtknowlesdtknowles Member Posts: 810 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Shootist

    What kind of problems have you had using range brass or what kind of problems are you avoiding?

    I use range brass and I inspect it carefully but I would like to know to look out for.

    I think a better analogy is finding a piece of candy on the ground but still in the wrapper and opening it and looking it over and then eating it :-)

    Tim
  • Shootist3006Shootist3006 Member Posts: 4,171
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by dtknowles
    Shootist

    What kind of problems have you had using range brass or what kind of problems are you avoiding?

    I use range brass and I inspect it carefully but I would like to know to look out for.

    I think a better analogy is finding a piece of candy on the ground but still in the wrapper and opening it and looking it over and then eating it :-)

    Tim


    Well, Tim - if you find new, unprimed brass still in the wrapper - go for it. Otherwise, not knowing how often and to what pressure levels a case has been loaded is a big enough question for me. As an example, when I have a batch of handgun brass (most often .45ACP) that is at the end of its usefull life (i.e. primer pockets beginning to loosen up), that batch of 1 to 2 thousand rounds will end up in the barrel when next shot. Likewise for rifle rounds but a bit more subjective, say after 15 loadings at near max and 3 case trimmings, I am no longer willing to stick my face next to it when it goes bang[B)]. Signs that a case has already failed are easy to see, pressure rings, split necks etc; signs that 5% of a batch failed and were trashed don't show up on the other 95% until the next time.

    If you do chose to dumpster dive for brass, good luck and be very carefull[xx(]
  • dtknowlesdtknowles Member Posts: 810 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks Shootist

    I take it you would only be worried about brass that has been fired more than once. It is not real hard to spot reloaded brass if you are looking for it. I was interested in problems with once fired range brass. I often find once fired brass only a few feet from the wrapper and the reciept from the seller. Just as often I see the ammo come out of the bag get fired and left to rot. Can't stand to let that happen. When I get brass I can't use I sell or trade it.

    I read that brass fired in Glocks is often over expanded in the head area because the chambers do not support the cartridges well enough. I think that the primers on ammo fired in Glocks look differnt than the primers from ammo fired in other guns, they have an elongaged or linear mark. I have reused brass that was fired in a 9mm Glock an have had no problems but I only fired in a CZ and a Star not a Glock so maybe once is a Glock is OK but not repeatedly.

    Any ideas?

    I value your opinion even when I might disagree. You are clearly not the only voice that says not to use brass of unknown origin and if you only use brass that you are the only person to have fired, you are less likely to have a problem.

    The brass that I am most leary of is belted magnum and rimless bottlenecked cases because of headspace issues even with once fired brass.

    Tim
  • sandwarriorsandwarrior Member Posts: 5,453 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Tim,

    I grab brass all the time from the range where I shoot. I inspect it each time for defects just like all the brass that I shoot. In fact defects don't make it to the range bucket where I shoot. They make it to a bucket that goes back to the range for recycle. The key here is learning how to quickly and accurately inspect every case that runs through your hands.
  • Shootist3006Shootist3006 Member Posts: 4,171
    edited November -1
    Tim;
    Handgun ammo with the lower pressures involved and easier headspacing issues are less problematic but, as a matter of personal preference, I avoid picking up range brass. Used to, esp. when I would hit the range right after one of the local P.D.s, lots of once fired 9mm (even after sorting out ALL of the Federal [email protected] [8D]) but I've got more 9mm brass now than I will ever load or shoot. Don't know about loading issues for tactical tupperware, don't like 'em or own one or even like to shoot them so no thoughts on the subject at all.
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