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30-378 weatherby powder

I recently bought a 30-378 and wanted to do some reloading. I was wondering what would be the best choice of powder to use? I have seen many articles that speak highly of retumbo. Please let me know your input.

Comments

  • nononsensenononsense Member, Moderator Posts: 10,542 ******
    edited November -1
    dr_rountree,

    Welcome to the Gunbroker forums!

    The 30-378 Weatherby is one of those unique animals that requires some special handling due to the case volume vs the caliber. Cartridges like this beg for long barrels and extra slow burning powders similar to charcoal in order to work properly. Unfortunately, manufacturers limit barrels to 26" so we have to resort to other ideas.

    I use heavy bullets only, simply because there is no efficiency with the lighter bullets and there isn't enough barrel length to burn all that powder. Another useful suggestion is to make some tests with mono-metallic bullets like the Barnes TSX. These bullets are slightly longer than the standard bullets because of the lighter weight of the bullet alloy therefore they take up some of that huge case space.

    Powders that work are the Retumbo you mention but the case will only be about 90% full. You need to look at:

    Hodgdon US-869

    Hodgdon 50 BMG

    VihtaVuori N-170

    VihtaVuori 24N41

    VihtaVuori 20N29

    These will all fill the case and in some instances, be a tiny bit compressed.

    Data for loads are listed on both the Hodgdon website and the Lapua/VihtaVuori website.

    Best.
  • MIKE WISKEYMIKE WISKEY Member Posts: 9,245 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I WAS GOING TO SUGGEST NITRATED CHARCOAL BRIQUETS[8D]
  • dr_rountreedr_rountree Member Posts: 4 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have also heard that the Hodgdon 50 BMG is a good powder to use. I see where you suggested this one. The reason I ask is because I am about ready to order some powder and just wanted to pick one to start with. Also, what bullets should I use? I have heard great things about the 180 barnes, but I also see where many people suggest using a heavier bullet. Is 180 grains enough?
  • nononsensenononsense Member, Moderator Posts: 10,542 ******
    edited November -1
    dr_rountree,

    It sounds like you're going to use this for some sort of hunting as opposed to target shooting so I'll skip those examples.

    Higher velocity cartridges often produce the higher pressures so a bullet designed to withstand these pressures and velocities is the best choice. As you suggest, Barnes may be the best known of these stoutly constructed bullets. I would opt for a 200 gr TSX over the 180's but that's just my opinion. With all this horsepower, why use anything lighter? I shot some of the Nosler AccuBonds also and they managed to hold up and appear to be accurate. Lapua makes a 'green' hunting bullet that they named the Naturalis so it can be included too. There are others I'm sure and some of the members will contribute those to the discussion.

    Which ever bullet you choose, it needs to be a high quality bullet with some stout construction.

    Best.
  • dr_rountreedr_rountree Member Posts: 4 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yes, this will mostly be used primarily for hunting. What things would change if I were to use this more for target shooting?
    thanks for all you input.
  • nononsensenononsense Member, Moderator Posts: 10,542 ******
    edited November -1
    dr_rountree,

    Modern long range target bullet designs use special ogives that are derived from some more specialized math than just your basic Tangent or Secant ogives. We are now using Haack models and the math of Von K?rm?n to arrive at the shapes of bullets rather than geometric modeling.

    The top bullet in the photograph is fairly traditional in shape while the construction is mono-metallic. The middle and bottom bullets are examples of the newer ideas involving sharper shapes for bullets which achieve higher ballistic coefficients.

    338lmturnedso1.jpg

    These newer shapes approach the goal of achieving BCs in the range of 1.0 and higher. There are a few drawbacks in that the standard rifling geometry needs some adjusting to accommodate the length and center of gravity of these bullets and others that get into the nitty-gritty details. Probably the biggest drawback though for most of us is the cost since these bullet designs require CNC machining and the companies providing them are located overseas currently. Unfortunately, the costs per bullet runs in the $1.50 to $2.00 each shipped. We had a manufacturer here in the States but they have closed their doors. An existing company has purchased the assets and designs but they are really slow to bring anything to the market. Another promising company with a new process started to work with the public but unfortunately received a Government contract which will tie up their production for a decade at least and maybe longer.

    This company carries some of the exotic target and hunting bullets that are not common in the general public:

    http://www.custombrassandbullets.com/index.html

    There are the traditional 'cup & core' bullets which are nothing short of superb but need to tested carefully when combined with these large capacity, high horsepower, high velocity cartridges. Sometimes this bullet design doesn't allow for the higher velocities and some disassembly has been observed. I like the Berger VLDs and the JLKs in particular but the Sierra Match Kings can print groups that are slightly more round consistently. Their BC is lower so you need to compensate with your scope adjustments.

    Take a look around and if you have questions ask away.

    Best.
  • mudd_boggermudd_bogger Member Posts: 75 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hey dr roundtree

    i have load worked up for my 30-378 that works pretty darn good using retumbo. Have use 4831,7828 an bmg but the retumbo beats them hands down for velocity an being acurate. I use 165 grain nosler balistic tips with 115 grains of powder seat to the factory leanth an not what the reloading manual says they have the oal a little short.I dont know what your shooting for a grain bullet but if its the 165 nosler start your loads at 112 grains an go in 1/2 grain steps but dont go over 116 grains thats max an my bolt started to open hard so i only fired the one shot. Right now im getting 3/4 inche groups at a 100yards but that dont mean that you will but atleast ive gave you a statrting point. Well good luck an i hope that this helps you out
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