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Load info in reloading guides

joesjoes Member Posts: 484 ✭✭✭
I have Lee's "Modern reloading" second edition. In the Guide it states for a 223 in a 55 gr jacketed bullet for varget- the min. is 26.5 and the max load is 27.5. I just purchased the Nosler fifth edition and in that guide it stated the max load for Varget is 25.0 grains with a starting load of 23.0. My question is why the difference? Has Nosler been lawyer-ized? 26.5 grains seems to work fine with no signs of pressure. Thank you, Joe.

Comments

  • Tailgunner1954Tailgunner1954 Member Posts: 7,815
    edited November -1
    Different bullet, different case, different rifle.
    Oh, and the biggest difference, Nosler actually tested their load, LEE copied theirs form "other" sources.
  • joesjoes Member Posts: 484 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    but tailgunner- 25.0 gr of varget as a max load? Nearly all of the resources I have checked suggest max loads of much more powder. Hodgdon is listing the loads as 25.5 gr min and 27.5 max load. Spot checking other load info as well in the Nosler guide is showing most loads seem to be on the light side verses than other published loads.
  • Rocky RaabRocky Raab Member Posts: 11,040 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Read tailgunner again. Different bullet, different case, different rifle. You'd expect the charge to be the same?
    I may be a bit crazy - but I didn't drive myself.
  • glabrayglabray Member Posts: 679 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I NEVER use a load from the Lee manual without checking it against one or more of the major supplier's manuals. I have found several Lee loads that must be typos.
  • woodmaster9woodmaster9 Member Posts: 416 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The "starting" loads in the Lee manual always seem weak to me.
  • k_townmank_townman Member Posts: 3,588
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Tailgunner1954
    Different bullet, different case, different rifle.
    Oh, and the biggest difference, Nosler actually tested their load, LEE copied theirs form "other" sources.

    I would be very interested in knowing how you know that LEE is guilty of plagiarism.
  • Rocky RaabRocky Raab Member Posts: 11,040 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Well, the introduction to the load data might just be a tiny little clue:

    "This section contains virtually all the load data published by the major powder suppliers..."

    Oh, and it is NOT plagiarism if you acknowledge the source. Be careful how you use words; they do mean something.
    I may be a bit crazy - but I didn't drive myself.
  • k_townmank_townman Member Posts: 3,588
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Rocky Raab
    Well, the introduction to the load data might just be a tiny little clue:

    "This section contains virtually all the load data published by the major powder suppliers..."

    Oh, and it is NOT plagiarism if you acknowledge the source. Be careful how you use words; they do mean something.

    Thank you. I know the definition of the words I use.
  • Rocky RaabRocky Raab Member Posts: 11,040 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Then you also know that to accuse someone in print with the intent to harm is called libel. Although there is argument that internet posting is closer to speech than print, in which case it would be slander.
    I may be a bit crazy - but I didn't drive myself.
  • HandLoadHandLoad Member Posts: 15,998
    edited November -1
    ...or is it calumny??
  • B17-P51B17-P51 Member Posts: 2,073 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The Lee books are simply a handy version of all the FREE info put out by the component manufacturers. I have all the same info in about 12 different sources.I always compare several sources anyway before starting anything. So stop with all the English lessons and be happy we have access to a ton of info that keeps us from getting blown up.I have been doing this a long time (36 yrs) and have never seen it so good. A starting load is a starting load and nothing more. Work it up and enjoy.I have already been 2 grains over "max" in a particular gun with no bad signs and 1.5 under in another and on the ragged edge of a hospital visit. To Quote a person much more knowlegable than me on this forum "YOUR MILEAGE MAY VARY" Source,Karl,
    AKA Perry Shooter
  • Rocky RaabRocky Raab Member Posts: 11,040 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Amen to that, and well said.
    I may be a bit crazy - but I didn't drive myself.
  • sandwarriorsandwarrior Member Posts: 5,599
    edited November -1
    Joes,

    I've seen in every single load manual a typo here and there. Load information on one weight bullet listed as max PSI then the same style bullet next weight up using 1/2 gr. more.

    That is why I check EVERY load against something else. Especially in case it doesn't seem right.

    I have seen certain cartridges that all bullet makers list as light. I then turn around and see a smaller cartridge get more powder used in it for the same bullet.

    I know also that all the manuals say to start at minimum and work up. In some of the rounds where I know I have good brass and a solid rifle to work with, "working up" may mean 2 gr. increments until I get near the top of the list. Then I go in 1/2 or .2 gr. increments.

    -hope that helps
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