.

? about ammo testing

Bubba Jr.Bubba Jr. Member Posts: 6,494 ✭✭✭
I set up my new Beta Chrony last week, and shot off samples from some of my batches that I loaded. I had a couple of batches (.40 S&W) that were fairly hot. Some had the primers flattened a little, some showed a very slight bulging of the cases, and some (9mm) had some strange markings on the cases from one of the guns I was using.

My question is, do any of you mark your ammo (like a number) so you know which batch it came from after you retrieve the brass? If you do, will a Sharpie stand up to the heat etc.? Or is there a better way of keeping track of your brass?

Thanks again for all your help previously.

Comments

  • Rocky RaabRocky Raab Member Posts: 11,040 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    When I'm testing a semi-auto, I set an empty cardboard box next to me on the bench, so that it catches the brass. I'll collect the cases after every ten-round string and put them back in the labeled sandwich baggie I brought that test batch in.
    I may be a bit crazy - but I didn't drive myself.
  • bpostbpost Member Posts: 31,144 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    A Sharpie works great, using different Sharpie colors helps separate the brass for later inspection. You can use different colors to identify groups on targets, velocity records and brass from each loading. The color tag on the target is a lot easier to see than a number.
  • clownboyclownboy Member Posts: 85 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I've heard of using finger nail polish on the primers to seal them. Maybe you could get several colors from the wife and mark them that way as well.
    You would have the prettiest brass around!

    Brad
  • JustCJustC Member, Moderator Posts: 16,038 ******
    edited November -1
    I only work with 1 batch of brass at a time which eliminates the work. I know that batch "x" has "y" number of firings.

    If it was because some in that batch were hotter than others, it really doeasn't matter unless they have a lot of firings, in which case I throw those away.
  • Bubba Jr.Bubba Jr. Member Posts: 6,494 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I had a 12x12 tarp spread out on the ground and I still had to get out my metal detector to find several that missed the tarp. I had 17 batches of rounds that I was testing, so I only shot 5 rounds from each batch, and marked the results down on a copy of the test results sheet that came with the Chrony. I only have about 6 Sharpie colors, so I thought that if I marked down the test # on each case before I loaded it into the magazine, I wouldn't have to get up and retrieve the spend cases after each round, I could just match them up to the test # on the data sheet.

    Some may think it's a little *, but I figure I'm not really going to learn much if I can't also match a damaged case to a particular batch.

    BTW, I have a rare wife that only wears clear nail polish, and I don't want to go to Wally World and buy a selection of nail colors. I might have some less-than-manly type try to follow me home.[:D][:D][:D]
  • dcs shootersdcs shooters Member Posts: 10,969
    edited November -1
    I mark the end of the brass across the primer with different color sharpies for different loads.
  • Rocky RaabRocky Raab Member Posts: 11,040 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Use the box, Bubba. You don't even have to get up.

    It isn't * when you are doing experimental load work. When I did the load work on the Makarov for the NRA two decades ago, I was able to detect slight flattening of the headstamp on some loads - which I deemed too hot. Later pressure testing in the lab proved that I was spot on in my guessing. (I couldn't fit pressure gear to the pistol.)
    I may be a bit crazy - but I didn't drive myself.
  • Bubba Jr.Bubba Jr. Member Posts: 6,494 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Rocky Raab
    Use the box, Bubba. You don't even have to get up.

    It isn't * when you are doing experimental load work. When I did the load work on the Makarov for the NRA two decades ago, I was able to detect slight flattening of the headstamp on some loads - which I deemed too hot. Later pressure testing in the lab proved that I was spot on in my guessing. (I couldn't fit pressure gear to the pistol.)


    I wish I could Rocky, but I had the 12x12 tarp spread out, and I had brass all over the tarp, and some even went out in the grass. I was using several different guns and comparing pistol to rifle velocities, and of course none of them spit the brass in the same direction. After I was done, then I just pulled up the corners of the tarp, let the brass roll to the center, then picked it all up.

    Thank you all for your help. As soon as the weather dries up, I'll go test samples of the rest of my batches, and this time I should have more precise data.

    Take care,
    Joe
  • chiefrchiefr Member Posts: 11,086 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I always closely examine the first brass casing fired when I test reloads or work up a load. When testing reloads, I never make large batches because if they are too hot, I have to quit firing and pull bullets.

    An examination of your case will tell you more about your pressures than anything else. If there are signs of excessive pressure after the first round. I cease firing my reloads.

    Bulging cases may not be signs of excessive pressure. Bulging could be due to milling problems of the chamber(Problem with your gun). I have fired many older 9mm pistols and noticed inperfections in the chamber and bulging cases with mild factory rounds.
    Also some European manufacturers like HK have grooved chambers, so naturally there will be markings on your one fired brass.
  • MobuckMobuck Member Posts: 11,557 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I use a cardboard box on the bench to catch the brass from autoloaders. Sometimes a plastic 5 gallon bucket works. If you intend to compare different loads you have to keep the brass segregated. I write on the cases with a sharpie.
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