In order to participate in the GunBroker Member forums, you must be logged in with your GunBroker.com account. Click the sign-in button at the top right of the forums page to get connected.

Colt Cowboy Reloading Question

1988z011988z01 Member Posts: 602 ✭✭✭✭
Hello All:
Waiting on my Colt SAA .45 to come any day. I have been reloading all my life, and recently had the BEST TIME EVER showing my oldest son how to resize a build some loads for our M1 Garand.

Anyway, I picked up some Hornady 255 grain Cowboy FN bullets, and was interested in moulds and casting for this thing. I've never reloaded for bullets with no jackets before in my 30 years of reloading, but I have thought about doing the whole thing for my new .45, old .44, and some other rounds.

Any advice here? I have always used RCBS stuff, with a few Hornady and Lee things here and about. Suggestions on BULLETS, MOULDS, LOADS, and EQUIPMENT WOULD BE GREAT.

As Always, Thanks,
Jamie
Myrtle Beach

Comments

  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    Lead loads need a set of dies that have a way of belling the case mouth .This keeps the lead from scraping against the case mouth, Then go to the post at the top of this forum labeled STICKY and read both post about Crimping..

    EDIT Hello your die set May come with a correct combination of dies You will need one die to return the outside diameter of the case to the correct size this die may also include the decapping pin to remove the primer Then you need a die to open up the case mouth This die is adjusted so the very end of the case is larger and will let the lead or jacketed bullet start into the case without hurting bullet. then you need a die that will push the bullet down the correct amount so the loaded round is the correct length Then if your bullet does not have a Crimp groove I recommend getting a taper crimp die. If your bullet does have a crimp groove you may be able to readjust the this last die so it will Roll Crimp without pushing the bullet further down in the case . Again you may have what you need but read the top 2 post on crimping and how to do it correctly.
  • 1988z011988z01 Member Posts: 602 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by perry shooter
    Lead loads need a set of dies that have a way of belling the case mouth .This keeps the lead from scraping against the case mouth, Then go to the post at the top of this forum labeled STICKY and read both post about Crimping..

    I had just ordered a set of RCBS carbide dies (3 die set). I thought this would be taken care of with that other die. I didn't know that there was a special set for lead bullets.
  • bpostbpost Member Posts: 32,204 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by 1988z01
    quote:Originally posted by perry shooter
    Lead loads need a set of dies that have a way of belling the case mouth .This keeps the lead from scraping against the case mouth, Then go to the post at the top of this forum labeled STICKY and read both post about Crimping..

    I had just ordered a set of RCBS carbide dies (3 die set). I thought this would be taken care of with that other die. I didn't know that there was a special set for lead bullets.

    Nope, the standard belling die in your RCBS dies works just fine. LEE has a nice 255 grain bullet for that cartridge, the molds are inexpensive and very easy to work with..
    This site http://www.castboolits.gunloads.com/ is the Mecca of casting and lead projectiles.

    The more you learn about casting before you start the better your results will be, it is FUN. For a beginner nothing beats a LEE bottom pour lead pot with LEE molds. FWIW, many people like tumble lube bullets, I am not one of them, preferring to size and lube in a machine designed for that task. Gather the wheel weights from local tire shops and you will have a great supply of bullet making metal.
  • 1988z011988z01 Member Posts: 602 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by bpost1958
    Originally posted by 1988z01
    Originally posted by perry shooter
    Gather the wheel weights from local tire shops and you will have a great supply of bullet making metal.


    Thanks a lot guys. I am headed back to VA tomorrow, and am going to see my old friends at a local garage I used to work at. They've been putting old weights in buckets for over a decade. Hope they are still there. Haha! Looking forward to this.
Sign In or Register to comment.