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does anyone remember ....

375H&H375H&H Member Posts: 1,545 ✭✭✭✭✭
what the bushnell scope was called that didn't have any adjustment knobs on it , you adjusted left / right & up / down with the mount itself .

I think it was a bal var or something like that , from around the late 60's or early 70's

Comments

  • Rocky RaabRocky Raab Member Posts: 12,878 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yup, BalVar was one such. It stood for Bausch & Lomb Variable and was (if memory serves) a 2.5-8X.

    At the time, the most accurate benchrest/varmint guns used high-power scopes like the Unertl. All used mounts that adjusted externally rather than internal scope adjustments. The BalVar attempted to capitalize on the "most accurate way" to shoot.

    Other scope and mount combos we'd find odd today included the Stith.
    I may be a bit crazy - but I didn't drive myself.
  • elubsmeelubsme Member Posts: 1,266 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    375, See my answer under general discussion. Eddie
  • AmbroseAmbrose Member Posts: 2,999 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Around 1953, Bushnell started imported a scope line called the Scopechief. Some of them had a "fixed" tube, that is, no adjustment knobs. These scopes came in 2 1/2X, 4X, 6X, 8X, 10X, and a 3-9X and were last sold around 1965. I have never seen one.

    Bausch & Lomb made "fixed" tube scopes starting in 1949 including 2 1/2, 4, 6, and 8X as well as variable scopes in 2 1/2-4X, 2 1/2-5X, 2 1/2-8X, and the big, expensive 6-24X. All the variable B&L scopes were called "Balvar", that is, Balvar 4; Balvar 24, etc. I collect the B&L scopes.

    Bausch & Lomb and Bushnell merged in 1973
  • FrancFFrancF Member Posts: 35,278 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Here is the Bausch & Lomb on my 25-06. 6-24 1/8" click on each Cam Front elevation, Rear windage.
    DSC_0629.jpg
  • 375H&H375H&H Member Posts: 1,545 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    thanks a bunch for all the info !!!!!!!!!
  • v35v35 Member Posts: 13,200
    edited November -1
    Ambrose
    How does the Balvar 6-24 stack up against the Unertl quality wise as to definition,clarity, field of view and brightness?
    Any info on how to remove the reticle on the 8A or have I asked you that before?
    Bob
    [email protected]

    quote:Originally posted by Ambrose
    Around 1953, Bushnell started imported a scope line called the Scopechief. Some of them had a "fixed" tube, that is, no adjustment knobs. These scopes came in 2 1/2X, 4X, 6X, 8X, 10X, and a 3-9X and were last sold around 1965. I have never seen one.

    Bausch & Lomb made "fixed" tube scopes starting in 1949 including 2 1/2, 4, 6, and 8X as well as variable scopes in 2 1/2-4X, 2 1/2-5X, 2 1/2-8X, and the big, expensive 6-24X. All the variable B&L scopes were called "Balvar", that is, Balvar 4; Balvar 24, etc. I collect the B&L scopes.

    Bausch & Lomb and Bushnell merged in 1973
  • Okie743Okie743 Member Posts: 2,224 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I own a few of the Balvar scopes by Bausch and Lomb and also some of the 4x16x50mm AO Bausch and Lomb scope before Bushnell bought the B&L company!

    The first Balvar scopes, sometime called 8A for the 2.5x8 had no windage or elev adj on the scope, it was in the special mounts. The later or next scope which has windage and elev adj's was called Balvar 8B. I was really pleasantly surprised when I first starting testing the B&L series of old model scopes as to how clear and bright most are as compared to the late model type scopes! They seem to be a few steps above the old weavers and redfields of the same time period, but again their price back then reflected such, Weaver for $40 vs $125 for a B&L!
    The 8B scopes will appear foggy or out of focus if the eyepiece is not adjusted properly and it's not readily apparent of the adjustment if you are not familiar with the scope!

    My B&L 4x16's from the early 70's are very good for both hunting, varmits,target!
    Never have had any problems with the scopes fogging or any issues at all and I've put them through the tests on large caliber rifles![;)]
  • rsnyder55rsnyder55 Member Posts: 2,626
    edited November -1
    Perhaps the increased brightness was due to a fewer number of elements in the scope. Each element, not matter how good the coatings are causes a reduction in the light that passes through it.
  • richardaricharda Member Posts: 405 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Until recently I had a Bushnell 10x ScopeChief from the 1950s w/o internal adjustments. It had a good clear set of lenses, and an objective assembly adjustable for paralax.
  • navlav8rnavlav8r Member Posts: 47 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I believe some of these mounts were made by Kuharsky (sp?). My uncle had a couple Balvar 8's in those mounts. I always thought the tapered crosshairs were pretty neat.
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