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powder # question

toad67toad67 Member Posts: 13,019 ✭✭✭✭
Sitting here thinking about my last post regarding powder suggestions for my 270 and I got to thinking even more in depth. On the powders that have been around for awhile what do the numbers mean if anything? I got to wondering if some of the IMR or Hodgdon 4 digit numbers refer to their powders as the numbers of welding rods apply to them? Just bored, thanks[:)]

Todd

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    Hawk CarseHawk Carse Member Posts: 4,370 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If the IMR number series means anything, I haven't been able to figure it out.
    From "fast" to "slow" 4227, 4198, 3031,4895,4320,4064,4350,4831,7828.
    If there is a code there, it is way over my head.

    True, some Hodgdon powder designations have meaning, but there is no consistent system about it.
    As said, H380 = 38.0 grains in .22-250
    HP38 = Hodgdon Powder .38 special
    Trap 100 = Guaranteed to shoot 100 straight at trap.
    HS6 = Hodgdon Shotgun powder no 6.

    But what does H414 signify? I don't know.
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    MobuckMobuck Member Posts: 13,831 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Some of those were around before WW2 so maybe there was a pattern then but I don't think it's been followed lately. Didn't Bruce Hodgdon name H380 because his 22/250 load with the new powder was 38 grains?
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    bpostbpost Member Posts: 32,664 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Mobuck
    Some of those were around before WW2 so maybe there was a pattern then but I don't think it's been followed lately. Didn't Bruce Hodgdon name H380 because his 22/250 load with the new powder was 38 grains?


    Yes, that is how H-380 got its name.
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    Rocky RaabRocky Raab Member Posts: 14,240 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Accurate and Alliant have chosen to number their powders in burn rate sequence, where a higher number means a slower burn rate. But none of them are "calibrated" to a standard. So you still can't definitively say "If this is the number, then this is its exact burn rate."

    I think IMR just spins a wheel and whatever comes up is the number.
    I may be a bit crazy - but I didn't drive myself.
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    Rocky RaabRocky Raab Member Posts: 14,240 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    So, on a list like that, where it shows H110 and W296 on two different lines, and also H414 and W760, and likewise HP38 and W231, which one is slower - because in all three instances, they are the EXACT same powder?

    If identical powders are on different adjacent lines, what can you discern about every other powder and the powder on the next line?

    Answer: Not one damn thing.
    I may be a bit crazy - but I didn't drive myself.
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    ToolfogieToolfogie Member Posts: 1,254 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Very interesting.
    Are there any other powders that are exactly the same?
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    Rocky RaabRocky Raab Member Posts: 14,240 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yes. HS-6 is W540 and HS-7 is W571. I believe that W571 has been discontinued.
    I may be a bit crazy - but I didn't drive myself.
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    noyljnoylj Member Posts: 172 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Relative Burn Rate is truly relative.
    For some cartridges, Red Dot is faster than Bullseye.
    If you compare three different burn rate charts, you will get three different lists.
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    5mmgunguy5mmgunguy Member Posts: 3,853
    edited November -1
    I think HS-7 has been discontinued too.
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