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Kicking myself!

KodiakkKodiakk Member Posts: 5,582
Went out for opening weekend and went straight to my honey hole. I got the deer here clocked. They come down this same trail very normally and I took a couple deer there last year.

I see some movement up the trail about 100 yards. I start shaking like a leaf. Get up, get my bow, and stand there ready. She was a bit nervous and looking around, pretty normal for public land. She stopped with her head behind two trees for a second. I draw. She takes 5 more steps and stops broadside 20 yards. Perfect shot and I regularly robin hood at this range if I shoot one spot. I'm panting and shaking like crazy. I let loose, she ducks, and the arrow zips right over her back. Would of a been a kill shot, but in the excitement I totally didn't remember to aim a bit low.

I just don't get it. I took a very nice buck on public land last year, and took a nice doe with my old style muzzleloader in the same spot. I don't get near the adrenline rush like when I see a deer coming when I'm bowhunting. Being public land I don't get a heck of a lot of shots. Any tips on overcoming the surge of adrenaline?

Comments

  • bambambambambambam Member Posts: 4,801 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I get the same way with buck or doe.

    I always talk myself through the buck fever, and deep breaths.

    I think if I stop getting that feeling it's time to hang it up.[:D]
  • Alan RushingAlan Rushing Member Posts: 9,002 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Any tips on overcoming the surge of adrenaline?

    Yeah, I've got the answer for you, but it will take some real commitment to make it right!

    You will have to get your toosh out hunting much more than what you have been!

    For most folks, the more they hunt, the more their success and the less their buckfever.

    You have just been shiesting yourself from getting sufficient hunting this season as yet!

    Actually, with archery, I have had much greater and more dramatic "buckfever" reaction than anytime with photography, rifle or shotgun.

    I've had "buck fever" with archery every single time I've taken the shot, plus at least half of the shots that I have passed on. Generally with archery we are having more time to anticipate before taking the shot.

    Sure is much more noticeable and dramatic with archery too, huh? [:0] [;)] [B)]
  • bang250bang250 Member Posts: 8,021
    edited November -1
    If I ever overcome it I'll stop hunting. I love that feeling!
  • buckeyboybuckeyboy Member Posts: 5,833
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Alan Rushing
    Any tips on overcoming the surge of adrenaline?

    Yeah, I've got the answer for you, but it will take some real commitment to make it right!

    You will have to get your toosh out hunting much more than what you have been!

    For most folks, the more they hunt, the more their success and the less their buckfever.

    You have just been shiesting yourself from getting sufficient hunting this season as yet!

    Actually, with archery, I have had much greater and more dramatic "buckfever" reaction than anytime with photography, rifle or shotgun.

    I've had "buck fever" with archery every single time I've taken the shot, plus at least half of the shots that I have passed on. Generally with archery we are having more time to anticipate before taking the shot.

    Sure is much more noticeable and dramatic with archery too, huh? [:0] [;)] [B)]
    drink heavily the night before
  • Alan RushingAlan Rushing Member Posts: 9,002 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    buckeyboy -

    Yeah, for sure!

    ... that is if one can then stay awake, not go too far and be barfing one's beely button out and the headache don't actually kill! [:0] [;)] [:)]

    I had found that usually if I were saturated with hunting, sighting and stalking often enough in a given season ... it usually kept me settled OK until after the shot.

    Anyhow, that's my story ... and I'll be sticking to it! [:0] [;)] [B)]
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