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Crossbow decocking-update

B17-P51B17-P51 Member Posts: 2,185 ✭✭✭
I am considering the purchase of a crossbow. I am going to ask basically the same question already posed but in a different way.
So as I read the thread, the only way to decock the bow is to shoot it. Is this correct? Also what is a decocking bolt? Some type of special "arrow" just for decocking? Does it have some sort of FLU - FLU tip or what?

Comments

  • festusfestus Member Posts: 998 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    To de-cock a crossbow, I have done it by putting my foot in the sturrip and holding the string with one hand then pulling the trigger. I do not recommend this but it will work on some crossbows. You will also get the feeling your shoulder may have just became dislocated. The one I have now has a safety built in so you have to have a bolt in place to be able to put in fire position. You can use your imagination to get around this if you wish but the low cost of a de-cocking bolt is the only way to go.
    A de-cocking bolt is made of fiberglass with a heavy aluminum tip on it designed to be shot in to the ground. I have been using the same de-cocking bolt for years and expect to use it for several more. The only thing I have done is dress the tip up a little because of hitting rocks and causing sharp edges on it.
  • B17-P51B17-P51 Member Posts: 2,185 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thank you. The state I live in recently made crossbows legal for 60+ folks. I have never held, shot or really seen a crossbow but am having trouble pulling back an 80% let off bow set at 52 lbs. I am looking at a Horton Storm RDX with the crank ACU draw feature. This seems like a good way to go for me. This bow is new and comes with a crank system, scope, 6 bolts, RAGE tips and a case for $800.00.
    It is like this one but with much more stuff:
    https://www.midwayusa.com/product/2928154661/horton-storm-rdx-crossbow-package-with-pro-view-2-scope-mossy-oak-treestand-camo
  • Okie743Okie743 Member Posts: 2,220 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    You need to go ahead and get yourself a real good target rated for crossbow use when you buy the bow.
    Allow at least another $100 for such.
    Do not shoot the target with hunting heads (broadheads) unless you want to ruin your target rapidly, even though it may be rated for such.

    I grind the tips blunt of regular arrow practice points for first few accuracy tests of a crossbow and arrows, (so as the arrow won't deeply penetrate the target) then install practice points for the mechanical type broadhead I'll be using for final accuracy tuning. Usually shooting a mechanical broadhead into a target will ruin either the target or the head when trying to remove the mechanical expaniding head. that is why the mechanicals manufacturer usually have a practice tip.

    Don't be surprised if you find few of the arrows don't group with the others. (that is a different subject)

    Follow the manufacturer of the crossbows owners manual instructions for decocking and other things.
  • B17-P51B17-P51 Member Posts: 2,185 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Okie
    You seem to know quite a bit about crossbows. What is your opinion of the bow I'm considering? Please be honest. Thanks!
    Opinions are also welcome from other knowledgeable folks. You are invited to post.
  • Okie743Okie743 Member Posts: 2,220 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by B17-P51
    Okie
    You seem to know quite a bit about crossbows. What is your opinion of the bow I'm considering? Please be honest. Thanks!
    Opinions are also welcome from other knowledgeable folks. You are invited to post.


    I'm not familiar with that bow and I think maybe Horton went out of business sometime back and now heard a rumor that maybe 10 point is making some bows under the Horton name. Read a lot of on-line reviews about crossbows and shop around. Might even go to a pro shop and shoot few. I really can't recommend buying a used crossbow, because new string and cables should be replaced immediately before even shooting, then 6 new arrows at $65 then $50 for three mechanical field points, next thing you have cost of new bow in a used one that might have a cracked limb.

    Get some other opinions and do several reviews. Be careful because you might buy a Horton that parts or warranty is No Longer Available. Crossbows are still bows, so don't think that you will be continuously taking deer at any more yards than a regular compound bow and you won't be disappointed. You will need a good crossbow target of at least $100, shoot mechanical heads for accuracy and shoot all (practice shoot) your arrows to see which ones that do not group with the others. Strings and cables need to be replaced every 3 years or more often if shot a lot and cost will usually average around $65 or more and your scope setting will change a lot after new string and cables are installed usually.

    Parts are NLA for some of the high priced Hortons, so beware.

    Good luck to you.
  • B17-P51B17-P51 Member Posts: 2,185 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thank you for your comments and advice. I am doing some research as you suggested and also asking people at archery shops for advice. I am finding a whole new world of friendship and camaraderie not unlike a shooter that goes to a cowboy event or CMP shoot for the first time. Every one I have met asks ME questions to narrow down just what I want to do with the bow. Many have steered me away from the real top end stuff and suggested some more moderately priced bows and pointed out where nothing is lost by buying this over that. Nothing cheap, just good solid construction and quality optics.
    Thanks again
    Jake
  • Okie743Okie743 Member Posts: 2,220 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by B17-P51
    Thank you for your comments and advice. I am doing some research as you suggested and also asking people at archery shops for advice. I am finding a whole new world of friendship and camaraderie not unlike a shooter that goes to a cowboy event or CMP shoot for the first time. Every one I have met asks ME questions to narrow down just what I want to do with the bow. Many have steered me away from the real top end stuff and suggested some more moderately priced bows and pointed out where nothing is lost by buying this over that. Nothing cheap, just good solid construction and quality optics.
    Thanks again
    Jake


    Optics on a crossbow: Just a heads up to watch out for when you first start using a crossbow during prime time hunting hours.
    The majority of the optics I've seen is really a joke on crossbows when it comes down to actual hunting conditions useage. They will have lighted crosshairs and several crosshairs lines and really look great when just looking into them, BUT when they are really needed during early morning or late evening, (prime times) and you turn on the lighted crosshairs you cannot see what is behind the scope crosshairs. Not enough light gathering into the crossbow scope to even see the animal which is same color as the background especially if the animal is in the woods and same color as the background.

    You will find that a good small Nikon monarch 1.5-5x (usually not ever set over 2X or leupold low power scope is a good option and with a good scope you do not need the lighted multiple crosshairs.

    If you cannot see them you cannot shoot them.
  • B17-P51B17-P51 Member Posts: 2,185 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks again Okie!
  • festusfestus Member Posts: 998 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Just thought I would add, I shoot a Horton and it is a very good crossbow. I have owned three or four Hortons over the years and all been good crossbows. I switched to a Burris fastfire 3 sight a few years back and have been pleased with it. Just wanted something more compact. Just something you might want to check out.
  • B17-P51B17-P51 Member Posts: 2,185 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    That's what I like about this place. People that know a hell of a lot more than I do are willing to share. Thanks

    UPDATE:
    Well I went ahead and purchased this setup right here on GB

    http://www.GunBroker.com/item/626727009

    It is new and the price is far less than just the bow would cost and comes with a bunch of extras. I guess I am officially an old man now.
  • Chief ShawayChief Shaway Member, Moderator Posts: 6,107 ******
    edited November -1
    Nice score. Congrats.
    I wish I could help more but I have zero experience with a cross bow.
  • Okie743Okie743 Member Posts: 2,220 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    You done good.
    Shop around and find one or two of the RAGE practice tips that match the RAGE mechanical hunting heads that you have. (you need the rage practice tip because if you shoot one of the hunting heads into a target you cannot pull it out backwards and the practice tip allows you to set your scope for hunting)

    You can start out with a regular Archery practice tip at first.
    I blunt the sharp tip on the practice tips so as they don't penetrate the target as deep and are easier to remove. Have a good backstop when practicing. If you miss the target that arrow is going to fly a long ways downstream. I can boresight crossbows using a gun laser boresighter stuck into the end of a arrow with the tip removed so as too make sure the scope is real close to on target after I have worked on a cross bow.
    Also it's common for some of the arrows to not group in same area as the majority at 30 yards. If so try a different cock fletch by rotating the arrow nock and it might then group with the others.
  • B17-P51B17-P51 Member Posts: 2,185 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks Okie
    I have a 223 case with a laser in it and someone that I work with said that would be good even with the slight taper to get the bow on the target at 10 yards, by laying it in the groove, then work from there. This method should have the bow shooting low, but at ten yards the target should be able to cover the difference. At least the windage should be ok. I'll update as I go along but I am pumped! The bow should arrive tomorrow or Tues.
  • OkieOkie Member Posts: 967 ✭✭✭

    That 223 case will most likely do the trick.

    I use a length of old hollow arrow, aluminum or carbon, install my Laser gun bore site spud inside the arrow which is held down snug in the rail by the string and bore site at not over 15 yards. Works great. After shooting in the bow you can re-install the Laser and make note of it's bore sight on the target and if changing scopes, etc, you have a close starting point, EXCEPT for the the note below about new cables and strings impact will shift even though the bore site is on target.

    You will find that if you take note and mark the position of the scope in the mount when removing and then re-installing very little if any adjustment is required.

    But keep a heads up when new strings and or cables are replaced.

    Shoot at a very close distance, like 15 yards because the bow point of impact will sometimes change by several inches. (let the bow set for several days is best so as the cables/string will settle in.

  • hillbillehillbille Member Posts: 12,969 ✭✭✭✭

    back to the decocker, I found an arrow that has a large weighted head, if you imagine, about the size of a 50cent piece with a 3/8 bolt through it, then dipped in rubbler coating. you just shoot it in the ground, so far it has held up to at least 12-15 shots and is still in one piece. got it at a local Rural King if there are any in your area.......

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