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about to buy a bow.

solidsolid Member Posts: 5 ✭✭
I'm about to buy my first bow. I was looking for some advice on what I should look for, how much I should spend, etc. I hope this question hasn't been over-asked here...but any help is greatly appreciated.I read on one post about going to a pro to get fitted. Does this usually cost anything? I don't have a lot of money to put toward it right off (truck problems). Thanks again,solid

Comments

  • salzosalzo Member Posts: 6,837
    edited November -1
    It has been asked often, but we all need certain answers at different times.My advice? Go to a bow shop, tell them you are new to the sport, and they will explain what you need. I have bought several bows from different shops, and have never been charged a fee for getting me "set up" with a bow. If I went to a place to buy a bow, and they threw in some sort of "set up" fee, I would go somewhere else.Stay away from mail order, and spend the few bucks extra that you would pay at the pro shop. Those few extra dollars pay for the very important attention the shop considers for your bow choice.And if you are new to shooting a bow, I hope you love it as much as I do. I do a moderate amount of shooting, on different types of shooters(rifle, pistol, shotgun, muzzleloader, etc) and my favorite thing to shoot, next to a sling shot, is a bow.
  • crazyplane21crazyplane21 Member Posts: 11 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    solid, Hey man, going to a bow shop is a great idea. If you can go to one now, go! Most places like Bass Pro Shops or other outfitters are having bow sales with complete set ups right now! They will tell you everything you need to know. They will measure your draw and usually give you lessons on shooting techniques at their range if you by one of there bows. Start off with something inexpensive. I recommend a PSE Nova to start. They are a good bow and are reasonably priced. They will also last years with proper upkeep.If you buy one already set up you'll save yourself some money. No since in buying an expensive bow if you end up not enjoying bow hunting. I'm sure with time and practice you'll love it though. By the time you get precise with it you'll have talked to many other hunters and find out there personal preferences when it comes to bows. I have friends that shoot 800 dollar matthew's and friends that shoot 200 dollar PSE's. It's all in your preference. I shoot a Browning. Hope this helps you out! Go get 'em.
  • solidsolid Member Posts: 5 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Salzo and crazyplane21: I appreciate the advice a whole lot. I'll definately go to a pro shop and I'll do that soon. I used to shoot when I was younger with a friend of mine, but have been out of it all for a few years. Thanks again for all the advice.solid
  • solidsolid Member Posts: 5 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Ok I have another question. I saw a PSE Nova kit at walmart for $169: It has a 29inch draw and is 65lbs. It is also 38" from axle to axle.There is another PSE Nova kit at walmart for $199 that has a 29inch draw and is 70lbs, and is also a single cam mechanism. It is also 39" from axle to axle. Both kits come with the same stuff. I forgot all, but it says it has everything you need. I also talked to some people at Dick's sporting goods, and their cheapest bow is $300 and its a Hoyte MT Sport. They said they could measure my draw length and the wieght for me and custom fit any bow. What do you guys think about this? I'm 6'3" with fairly long arms, if that helps any. I really don't know how much I can spend, but I'd rather not spend tons on my first bow and $300 is getting up there.So what do you think about the walmart PSE's?Thanks again,solid
  • salzosalzo Member Posts: 6,837
    edited November -1
    It all depends. Those prices at Walmart are good, but you are still going to haveto get set up, and I do not know of a walmart that does that.I do not have any experience with the bows you mentioned, but you should make sure that the draw length is adjustable(since you do not know what your draw length). I have average, on the short side arms, and my draw is 28.5 inches.28-29 is considered average, so if your arms are longer, that bow might not be for you. You really should go to a pro shop, especially as a newbie to the sport.If your choice is between Dicks and Walmart, go to Dicks. They will get you somewhat set up.Any of the bows you mentioned would be sufficient.
  • bvinsonbvinson Member Posts: 3 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Solid: One of the first things to consider is whether you want to use a mechanical release, or shoot with fingers. This will make a difference in your draw length. Next, decide if you want to use carbon arrows or aluminum. Considering your size (I'm 6'1" myself), I would probably suggest carbon arrows. They are more expensive, but, because of your draw length (probably 30-31 inches) you will be able to use smaller diameter arrows (the smaller, the faster!). Also, if you purchase a dozen QUALITY carbon arrows (about $85 - $100/doz.), you won't have to worry about them getting bent when you unavoidably stick a few in the ground or a tree when you first start shooting. One thing to keep in mind: BE CONSISTENT! Decide on the weight of the tips/broadheads that you want to use (75, 85, 100, 125 grains), length of veins/feathers, and posistion of the nocks--this will save some headaches!!You might visit a local pro shop and have them measure your draw length, and get some prices on some good starter bows. I think you will end up spending a lot more $$ if you blindly go to a pro shop and tell them to "fix me up". I would suggest talking to friends that have bows and listen to their advice. After getting all the "free" information that you can, I would make a list of all the parts that you want/need; ie, sights, arrow rest, string silencers, release, peep sight or kisser button, quiver, and limb savers. Then start shopping around. Try cabelas.com and basspro.com. Also, there are lots of great archery websites; just go to yahoo.com and search for "archery supplies". I know it may seem overwhelming at first, but the energy expended in getting set-up is nothing compared to the rewards!! BTW, my first bow was a Reflex Bighorn (made by Hoyt). I bought it at Bass Pro for $199, and I still hunt with it today!
  • solidsolid Member Posts: 5 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    bvinson: Thanks for all your help! I've been shopping around, and I'm getting it all together, but I'll definately look at what you said.Thanks to everybody else too!
  • jhj370jhj370 Member Posts: 57 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Solid,These guys are giving ver sound advice. I just went through the same process as you. I was shooting a Martin and got away from the sport for about 8 years. When I decided to get back in, I went and shot several bows. Before I shot, I was leaning toward the PSE Nova you spoke of before. I absolutely hated it, we were not a good match. On the other hand, I spent a couple hundred more and bought the Hoyt MT package. Point is, it doesn't do any good to buy a bow at Wal-Mart without shooting it, and then discover you don't like it. Shoot several different brands in you measurement and price range and then decide what fits you best. It's not the amount of money, speed, or quietness of the bow. If you aren't comfortable with what is in your hands, you will ALWAYS have doubt when you pull it back, and eventually will buy something else. Take your time, and do it right! Good Luck.
  • #72#72 Member Posts: 152 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    My advice to you would be to not get too caught up in the short, fast bow craze that makes you believe thats what you need to get a deer etc.Thats fine if you are experienced but the truth is , a longer riser bow is more forgiving and easier to shoot.I would still buy a single cam if possible or even a round wheel over a double cam to start.Also,get as high a let-off bow as you can afford.These hints will keep you from getting frustrated.Remember,the fastest bow is still slower than an animals reaction time.Get something quiet and easy to shoot.
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