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40+ yards

A.GunA.Gun Member Posts: 1,326 ✭✭✭✭✭
I shoot a fred bear vapor 300, its an older model like 2 years but groups awesome at 20-30 yards. I use a deer target rather than a bullseye, helps me more, to shoot at. I group about 3 1/2 inches at 30 yards. My bow is set at 69 lbs at the moment, I have no problem drawing it and if I had to I could hold that sucker for 15-20 seconds before shakin'.
So heres the thing, I have never taken a archery shot more than 25 yards, but should I have the oppurtunity at a longer range shot with my bow set at 69 lbs do you guys think I would have the penetration power at that distance to kill a deer? I am hunting an open field where my farthest shot would be 40 yards and thats where the deer would be comming from usually. I use expandables I think that might play a roll in this as well, rather tahn a fixed blade...I just don't know if for next season bump up the poundage or leave it alone[?]
-Thanks for the input, happy huntin' (ps I practice shoot playing around at 40-50 yards but I have no pin on my sight for it)

Comments

  • jpwolfjpwolf Member Posts: 9,164
    edited November -1
    69 lbs, you have no idea the power generated. If you are competent enough, you could kill out to 60, so, yes. As far as the poundage, do what you want. I'd leave it alone. Tuning sucks.
  • Hunter MagHunter Mag Member Posts: 6,612 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    With todays compounds you'll have plenty of penetration even at 40yds. Just make sure you can shoot accurate at that distance.
    If it's windy don't chance it.
  • HandgunHTR52HandgunHTR52 Member Posts: 2,735
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by A.Gun
    I shoot a fred bear vapor 300, its an older model like 2 years but groups awesome at 20-30 yards. I use a deer target rather than a bullseye, helps me more, to shoot at. I group about 3 1/2 inches at 30 yards. My bow is set at 69 lbs at the moment, I have no problem drawing it and if I had to I could hold that sucker for 15-20 seconds before shakin'.
    So heres the thing, I have never taken a archery shot more than 25 yards, but should I have the oppurtunity at a longer range shot with my bow set at 69 lbs do you guys think I would have the penetration power at that distance to kill a deer? I am hunting an open field where my farthest shot would be 40 yards and thats where the deer would be comming from usually. I use expandables I think that might play a roll in this as well, rather tahn a fixed blade...I just don't know if for next season bump up the poundage or leave it alone[?]
    -Thanks for the input, happy huntin' (ps I practice shoot playing around at 40-50 yards but I have no pin on my sight for it)


    You should be able to hold it for 1-2 minutes before starting to "feel the burn", if not longer. If you can only hold for 15-20 seconds, then you have the draw weight set too high, or you need to practice holding longer to build up the muscles in your back and shoulders. With todays bow/arrow technology, you can get faster arrow speeds with lighter draw weights. My current bow is set 5 pounds less than my last bow, but still generates 30 fps greater speed.
  • dcso3009dcso3009 Member Posts: 2,350 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    You may even want to turn down your dw if you can only hold for a short time. The other option is to shoot more. I have my bow set at 64lbs and would take a shot out to 50 in the right conditions. Penetration would not by your issue... it would be putting it in the right spot. It is more important where you hit them, than what you hit them with. Even a field point in the right place would kill a deer.
  • pre6422hornetpre6422hornet Member Posts: 34 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I can't agree more with everone else. My Hoyt Vtec is set at 66lbs and it is plenty fast for me. My last bow ( Bear) was set at 62lbs and I had no trouble shooting pass throughs.

    Practise, practise, practise. I personally practise at 30, 40, and 50 every day during the summer and just before season make sure the 20 yard pin is still on. You would be amazed how easy a 20-30 yard shot is when you usually only shoot 40-50.

    If you can put the arrow where you want.... 69lbs is no problem. As handgunhtr52 already explained, you should be able to hold alot longer than you currently can. Think of this... You have been sitting all day long during the rut in 30 degree weather. It is 11am and here comes Mr. Big. Will you be able to pull your bow back smoothly if at all??? It is amazing when you are cold how much harder it is to pull...
  • fishermanbenfishermanben Member Posts: 15,370
    edited November -1
    I've found that as a general rule, if you can hit a paper plate every time at 40 yards, you should not shoot past 35 in the woods.

    Whatever you can accurately shoot at a target, subtract at least 5 yards for your field shots.

    Also when shooting past 30 yards, there is a whole lot more that can, and will go wrong.

    Even the best shots that I know, keep their shots under 40 yards 90% of the time.

    Ben
  • A.GunA.Gun Member Posts: 1,326 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:If you can put the arrow where you want.... 69lbs is no problem. As handgunhtr52 already explained, you should be able to hold alot longer than you currently can. Think of this... You have been sitting all day long during the rut in 30 degree weather. It is 11am and here comes Mr. Big. Will you be able to pull your bow back smoothly if at all??? It is amazing when you are cold how much harder it is to pull...-I'm 18, never had trouble pulling a bow back ever. If I really had to I could hold my bow for 1-2 minutes I just go on the idea of, wait until seconds before you're going to take the shot then draw. That way if he does go behind something then you have more time to hold...taht's how I have always done it.
  • HandgunHTR52HandgunHTR52 Member Posts: 2,735
    edited November -1
    I personally follow the draw when you can't be seen tactic. This usually leads to having to hold for a while longer. Plus, that way I can mentally check my anchor position and body position. This usually leads me to be at full draw for an average of 2-3 minutes.
  • A.GunA.Gun Member Posts: 1,326 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Ya I try to do that too handgun, but sometimes it doesn't always work that way lol, where I hunt by the time i see him he's gonna be 40-60 yards at the farthest
  • JimmyJackJimmyJack Member Posts: 4,848 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I agree with Fishermanben, and I might add that 40-60 yard shots are what give bowhunters a bad name. If you cant get within 30 yards work on your hunting tactics, too many deer go wounded by too long of shots that cannot be placed properly.
  • bang250bang250 Member Posts: 8,021
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by JimmyJack
    I agree with Fishermanben, and I might add that 40-60 yard shots are what give bowhunters a bad name. If you cant get within 30 yards work on your hunting tactics, too many deer go wounded by too long of shots that cannot be placed properly.


    x2
  • jpwolfjpwolf Member Posts: 9,164
    edited November -1
    quote:I agree with Fishermanben, and I might add that 40-60 yard shots are what give bowhunters a bad name. If you cant get within 30 yards work on your hunting tactics, too many deer go wounded by too long of shots that cannot be placed properly.


    Obviously some of you have never hunted deer out the open plains like we have to in northeast Colorado. I would most certainly take a 50 yard shot on a calm day. And btw, sitting in a stand is not "hunting". It is properly defined as "waiting". Spot and stalk in the open and your "opinion" will change.

    A 50 yard shot in the open on a calm day is a dead deer, here. Very dead. Not being proficient with your equipment is what gives bowhunters a bad name, although I wasn't aware that bowhuners had a bad name, only bow "waiters". The landowners around here love us. Many who are hesitant to let let you hunt, happily agree when you tell them you are hunting archery, not rifle. Too many dead/wounded farm critters I guess.
  • SCOUT5SCOUT5 Member Posts: 16,195 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    To answer the qustion, if you are accurate at that distance trust your self and kill your deer. Only question is how much speed do you need for the mechanical head to work properly? I'm sure you have enough a 40 yards.

    As for bow hunters and bow waiters. You have to hunt in the terrain available.

    For some that means tree stands and waiting. Here in Indiana that's the most effective technique. For those of you who haven't tried it, it isn't that easy. Most properties we hunt are small and there is no room to hunt and stalk, we have to wait for the deer to come to us. Scouting, preperation, and scent control take a lot of time if one wants good odds of success.

    I have also been west where there are large open areas to hunt and if you have to wait for the deer to come to you, well it could take awhile. You have to go after the deer in these areas and you need to be real personal with your 50 and yes even 60 yards pins. If you aren't your odds of success drop considerably. My brother in law wants to hunt mule deer in SD and we can get archery tags over the counter. I told him to set up 50 and 60 yard pins. He thought I was nuts. Well I took him with me to SD pheasant hunting this year and made a trip over to mule deer country to let him see for himself. Guess what, he is setting up his 50 and 60 yard pins as I type, so he can practice for a year before we go.

    Different thechniques for differnt terrain.

    Support each other, don't tear down our heritage. I would like my great grand children to be able to hunt, in what ever terrian they should happen to find themselves in.

    Jasper May
  • fishermanbenfishermanben Member Posts: 15,370
    edited November -1
    Good post, scout.

    Ben
  • A.GunA.Gun Member Posts: 1,326 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If I practiced at 50, and it was calm I would take a crack at 50 yards. At 70 lb I don't see a problem? Unless you hit the shoulder blade or a rib I guess, personally I practice ALOT and I think at 35 yards is my farthest, although I shoot at 40 in the yard.
  • surekillsurekill Member Posts: 1,926 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Best thing to do is set down in a chair and then draw your bow back.
    If you can't draw it WITHOUT bring your feet off the floor than your are over bowed "too much draw weight".
    Why don't you move your treestand closer to where the deer are coming out into the feild?
    As for 69lbs that is enuff to shoot a deer out to 40 yards.
  • A.GunA.Gun Member Posts: 1,326 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:surekill
    Senior Member



    USA
    1869 Posts
    Posted - 11/02/2007 : 07:00:25 AM

    Best thing to do is set down in a chair and then draw your bow back.
    If you can't draw it WITHOUT bring your feet off the floor than your are over bowed "too much draw weight".
    Why don't you move your treestand closer to where the deer are coming out into the feild?
    As for 69lbs that is enuff to shoot a deer out to 40 yards.

    I'm on the only tree close enough to the field lol, I looked for an hour one afternoon and chose the one I'm on. Good trails at about 10 yards in front of me though, I CAN'T shoot past 30 yards too much brush and thick stuff, but if there was a bigun' at 30 I'd prolly take him.
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