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Cleaning T/C Hawken percussion

10x10010x100 Member Posts: 158 ✭✭✭
I have been given an older T/C Hawken. The instruction manual says to clean the barrell from the breech plug end with hot soapy water. The disassembly instructions show a picture of the barrell with the breech plug in, and says that the picture represents the most the barrell should be disassembled.

Before I mess up the barrell, is the breech plug supposed to be removed?

Thanks for the help.

Comments

  • bull300wsmbull300wsm Member Posts: 3,289
    edited November -1
    No it's not to be removed...I use hot soapy water to clean mine...bull
  • 10x10010x100 Member Posts: 158 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks for the help!
  • allen griggsallen griggs Member Posts: 33,014 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    From the breech plug end?

    Not a good idea, leave that breech plug alone.
    Pull the barrel from the stock, remove the nipple, and use a patch on the cleaning rod to run soapy water in and out of the muzzle.
    That rifle is pretty easy to clean once you remove the barrel from the stock. Very good design, and a great rifle.

    I don't know why they would say to remove the breech plug.
  • bambambambambambam Member Posts: 4,801 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The breech plug isn't removable with out a torch, vise, and big wrench.

    I have the same gun.

    1 I take the barrel off.

    2 Remove nipple.

    3 Fill gallon milk jug with scalding hot water.(top of jug cut off)

    4 Nipple end of barrel in jug.

    5 Use carpet looking cleaning accesory on rod to sqeegy bore.

    6 The carpet thing will make a syphon(like a syringe) and suck & push the hot water up and down the barrel.

    7 Wire(brass) brush barrel, carpet thing, wire brush, carpet thing until water comes out clean.(you will need to change water when it's dirty)

    8 Leave barrel muzzle end down for couple hours to drain completly.

    9 Use bore butter to season and coat the barrel.

    10 Reassemble and leave upside down in gun cabinet for a week.
  • CapnMidnightCapnMidnight Member Posts: 8,520
    edited November -1
    Bore mop, it's called a bore mop.
    W.D.
  • 10x10010x100 Member Posts: 158 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Capn,

    I like "carpet thingy" better!
  • bambambambambambam Member Posts: 4,801 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by CapnMidnight
    Bore mop, it's called a bore mop.
    W.D.


    That's it! Thanks.[:D]
  • hillbillehillbille Member Posts: 11,386 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by CapnMidnight
    Bore mop, it's called a bore mop.
    W.D.


    I allways just used a regular jag and patch, it works the same way if it is a tight fit, just wet the patch first so it doesn't get stuck..
  • andrewsw16andrewsw16 Member Posts: 11,311
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by 10x100
    Capn,

    I like "carpet thingy" better!



    Naaa. Fuzzy weeener is better. [:D]
  • BergtrefferBergtreffer Member Posts: 629 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I use a 5-gallon bucket of hot water with something like Tide detergent in it. The nipple end of the barrel is in the water; nipple removed. I use a cleaning rod with a tight fitting patch, and that sucks the water up and down the barrel. The approximate 5 gallons of water affords plenty of water for scrubbing. After the initial cleaning in the hot soapy water, I removed and drain the barrel and dry it out with patches made from paper towel (very absorbant of the water). Then I shoot brake cleaner into the barrel and use the cleaning rod and a patch to scrub the brake cleaner back and forth. I then clean out the brake cleaner and scrub the barrel again in fresh 5 gallons of hot soap water. It works pretty good. After a thourough drying with paper towl patches, and sitting overnight to air out, I then oil the barrel real well.

    While shooting at the range, between shots I dry patch the barrel with paper napkin patches. I like the paper napkins from McDonalds restaurants. They are plentiful and cheap, and cut at the correct size, their thickness is good and make great one-time disposable patches. Dry swabbing the barrel really helps keep the gunk under control and helps with more accurate shooting.
  • bambambambambambam Member Posts: 4,801 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    My dad's friend that introduced me to B.P. swore by Ajax soap.

    I never tried it though.
  • Okie743Okie743 Member Posts: 1,975 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by hillbille
    quote:Originally posted by CapnMidnight
    Bore mop, it's called a bore mop.
    W.D.


    I allways just used a regular jag and patch, it works the same way if it is a tight fit, just wet the patch first so it doesn't get stuck..


    To prevent the jag patch hang up which you will eventually witness, use a same caliber bore brush and wrap a patch around the brush. This will prevent the jag patch hang-up. When you get a patched jag hung in bore, don't panic and go to breaking rods, just add some liquid, only need enought to saturate the hung patch, like water or if in the woods use coffee or any liquid down the bore beside the ramrod then twist the rod in the same direction that tightens the threaded jag and when it starts turning start pulling and it will come right out. The liquid lubes the bore and patch behind the hung patch. Also you don't need to remove a T/C Hawken type barrel for cleaning and no need to remove the nipple at first. I used to do the same. Get a black powder bore cleaner, like for example T/C 13 or 17 or just water if no solvent and wrap a patch around the bore brush, (you can place a patch under the hammer on the nipple with the hammer down to prevent cleaner coming out the nipple hole, place a patch on the bore brush (wrap it around the brush, push all the way to the bottom then pull back, replace the patch and clean until patch is not black, then dry swab, then use T/C bore butter and little Rem oil into the nipple port area, remove the nipple and place little bore butter on its threads and don't over tighten when re-installing. Get yourself a patch getter because every once in awhile until you get the hang of it you will loose a patch in the bore. THEN most important. After the bore butter, eand final, make yourself a note and don't let the barrel sit more than 2 days and go back with the bore butter on a patched bore brush and clean until all the rust is gone. The barrel will be severely rusted within 3 days (like cancer growing inside the barrel) after the first cleaning and will be ruined with-in a few months if you do not go back and give it a follow-up as the most important. Also do not leave a patch in the barrel on a ramrod. I've witnessed several barrel ruined by guys thinking that the first good cleaning and oiling was the final!
    T/C and others recommends the HOT water because the hot water in bucket method get the metal hot and aids in drying before oiling or using bore butter for storage, etc, but does not mention or even give a hint of the most important go back for the final bore rust prevention conditioning! Do this go back and check method even if you think you are using a NON_corrosive BLACK powder sub or you will get a big shocking rusty bore surprise next year at hunting time.
  • He DogHe Dog Member Posts: 48,620 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I leave the rifle assembled and use a nipple fitted with a plastic tube which goes into the bucket of soapy water. Same as Bam3 described otherwise with carpet looking thingy to swamp out the barrel.
  • MMOMEQ-55MMOMEQ-55 Member Posts: 13,134
    edited November -1
    "Carpet looking thingy" LMAO[:D]

    Pretty much what everyone else has said but I have a 3" piece of PVC pipe with a cap on one end. I have a wooden stand that holds the pipe up. I boil a gallon of water and pour it down the barrel from the muzzle. I also fill the pipe with boiling water. I first use a bore crush to scrub the barrel then I use the "Carpet Thingy" aka bore mop, several times in and out of the barrel. If you keep your barrel seasoned with Bore Butter it will be easier to clean.

    When I buy an old gun that is really dirty I use brake cleaner on the barrel to get all the crud, old grease, powder etc out of the barrel. That is something you do not want to use all the time. It will take the seasoning out of your barrel.

    While out shooting I use alcohol after every 3 shots on a "Carpet Thingy" after a bore brush.
  • Okie743Okie743 Member Posts: 1,975 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by MMOMEQ-55
    "Carpet looking thingy" LMAO[:D]

    Pretty much what everyone else has said but I have a 3" piece of PVC pipe with a cap on one end. I have a wooden stand that holds the pipe up. I boil a gallon of water and pour it down the barrel from the muzzle. I also fill the pipe with boiling water. I first use a bore crush to scrub the barrel then I use the "Carpet Thingy" aka bore mop, several times in and out of the barrel. If you keep your barrel seasoned with Bore Butter it will be easier to clean.

    When I buy an old gun that is really dirty I use brake cleaner on the barrel to get all the crud, old grease, powder etc out of the barrel. That is something you do not want to use all the time. It will take the seasoning out of your barrel.

    While out shooting I use alcohol after every 3 shots on a "Carpet Thingy" after a bore brush.


    Is the alcohol you reference regular rubbing alcohol, denatured type, or ???
    (or is it like Jack Daniels for yourself internally to ease the rib pain from a hard kicker gun)(ha, but true)

    The T/C bore butter seems to be a good thing! I season my BP barrels with T/C bore butter.
  • MMOMEQ-55MMOMEQ-55 Member Posts: 13,134
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Okie743
    quote:Originally posted by MMOMEQ-55
    "Carpet looking thingy" LMAO[:D]

    Pretty much what everyone else has said but I have a 3" piece of PVC pipe with a cap on one end. I have a wooden stand that holds the pipe up. I boil a gallon of water and pour it down the barrel from the muzzle. I also fill the pipe with boiling water. I first use a bore crush to scrub the barrel then I use the "Carpet Thingy" aka bore mop, several times in and out of the barrel. If you keep your barrel seasoned with Bore Butter it will be easier to clean.

    When I buy an old gun that is really dirty I use brake cleaner on the barrel to get all the crud, old grease, powder etc out of the barrel. That is something you do not want to use all the time. It will take the seasoning out of your barrel.

    While out shooting I use alcohol after every 3 shots on a "Carpet Thingy" after a bore brush.


    Is the alcohol you reference regular rubbing alcohol, denatured type, or ???
    (or is it like Jack Daniels for yourself internally to ease the rib pain from a hard kicker gun)(ha, but true)

    The T/C bore butter seems to be a good thing! I season my BP barrels with T/C bore butter.



    Denatured alcohol LOL
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