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Why a muzzle loader ?

flyingcollieflyingcollie Member Posts: 197 ✭✭✭
Just curious . . . why do you shoot a muzzle loader ?

On other threads, there's been discussion on pellets, and synthetic propellants, looking around, I see modern-looking pieces painted in camo . . . my question is, if you're not "into" the sort of "re-enactment" , historical aspect of black powder arms, wouldn't it make more sense just to opt for all the advantages and efficiencies cartridge weapons and modern powders have provided over the past 140 years or so ?? What am i missing?

Comments

  • carbine100carbine100 Member Posts: 3,165 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Adds to the length of hunting season.

    I get to hunt more.
  • swopjanswopjan Member Posts: 3,292
    edited November -1
    Got passionate about guns when I was 19 and working away from home, buying black powder guns allowed me to amass a small collection of revolvers which I sent home without the hassle of an FFL. I like the historical aspect too; for example, I can't bring myelf to want an 1851 in .44 caliber. Maybe someday I'll hunt with some of mine but until then I'm just a cowboy [8D]

    And flintlocks are just cool [:D]
  • cbyerlycbyerly Member Posts: 689 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    If you are a hunter who enjoys the chase, what is the sense of using a high velocity firearm that does not require any stalking effort on your part. With a muzzle loader, you have to make the stalk get within a resonable distance to make the kill. You will have a much greater sense of satisfaction after a genuine "hunt" rather than a shoot.
  • anderskandersk Member Posts: 3,825
    edited November -1
    I got into shooting muzzle loaders when I moved to Massachusetts. There is no rifle hunting in MA, so I had to go primitive. Only then did I discover how much fun it is to shoot muzzle loaders. It's a tinkerers sport, so ya gotta like messing around with guns. Who doesn't like that!!!

    Now I have several muzzle loaders and even a pistol. It's a flint lock Kentucky Pistol ... what a blast. I even went through all the hassle of getting a permit to own restricted weapons in Canada (I've moved back here after seven great years in MA) so I could own and shoot pistols.

    Here I can only shoot them at my club range. Sometimes I shoot on my own but mostly I shoot at our organized monthly Black Powder Shoots. I may start using my muzzle loading long guns for hunting just for the challenge and for enlarging my hunting area.
  • hillbillehillbille Member Posts: 13,115 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    gotta agree with andersk, I just got bored with the inlines. I got a flintlock two years ago, got my first deer this year with it, a big doe, now I plan on getting a buck next year, it just puts the fun back in hunting, for me at least.........

    the flintlock can be very touchy to shoot, the flint must be just right, square, ect, so does the powder in the pan, and yes it can make you curse when you have a misfire, or a hangfire, but that is the challenge, and fun of it, when you finally get your deer or whatever you are hunting it makes it all the better knowing what you have accomplished.
  • anderskandersk Member Posts: 3,825
    edited November -1
    If I do go to a muzzle loader for deer hunting next Fall, it will probably be a percussion cap Hawken, not a flint lock. I just don't think I could handle ignition problems when it is damp or wet. I'm getting too hungry for some more venison!

    I would have used it this year except I misunderstood what was considered an unloaded gun. I thought I would have to fire it at the end of each day, and that seemed like a lot of gun cleaning! Only after the season did I learn that you just have to remove the cap (or primer, or powder in the pan) ... I think I could handle that! That is all I had to do down in Massachusetts ... sweet!
  • allen griggsallen griggs Member Posts: 34,331 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yes, in Georgia if there is no cap on the nipple the gun is considered unloaded.
    And, you can leave that rifle loaded for weeks with no ill effect. I have left my home made Tennessee Mountain Rifle loaded for 8 weeks and it fired fine, and the 4 pointer died quick.
  • BergtrefferBergtreffer Member Posts: 629 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The in-line type just doesn't appeal to me. It has to have a side hammer and an octogon barrel. In-lines just don't look right, not natural. My first and only deer with a front stuffer was a 4-buck taken with a .58 caliber Zouave and a Civil War minie ball.
  • He DogHe Dog Member Posts: 49,570 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    What's not to like? If you like hunting and shooting why not experience it in 1840 fashion as well as in 2012 fashion. I cannot hunt more than one deer hunt in NM, so it does not give me another chance or extend the season, but it does give me another flavor of hunt, and a better chance third choice for a draw. Front stuffers have their own grace and style and feel when carried (to me far more so than any black rifle) and shot that connects me to the past. One of mine is a Hatfield Kentucky style, one is a Hawken style, so there is a direct link to the earlier times.
  • OakieOakie Member Posts: 38,910 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by flyingcollie
    Just curious . . . why do you shoot a muzzle loader ?

    On other threads, there's been discussion on pellets, and synthetic propellants, looking around, I see modern-looking pieces painted in camo . . . my question is, if you're not "into" the sort of "re-enactment" , historical aspect of black powder arms, wouldn't it make more sense just to opt for all the advantages and efficiencies cartridge weapons and modern powders have provided over the past 140 years or so ?? What am i missing?


    Man are you missing out on some serious fun. Its great to be able to hunt with a gun like our forfathers. Its alot more challenging and extends our hunting season by two months. This is my favorite season.It takes skill to hunt with a muzzle loader and a lot of practice. Real, pure enjoyment.
  • steve45steve45 Member Posts: 2,920 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    In my state if you put in for an Elk permit (lottery type system)with a highpower rifle you get to hunt about once every 10 years. If you put in for a muzzleloader hunt you get to go almost every year.
  • jednorrisjednorris Member Posts: 21 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Over the years I have had a problem with removing a #11 cap then putting it back on the nipple. After doing it a couple of times, the priming powder in the cap clogged the nipple and the gun failed to dis-charge. I went to a device that replaced the standard nipple and shot a pistol primer. It probably is not legal everywhere however.
    Jed
  • Chief ShawayChief Shaway Member, Moderator Posts: 6,110 ******
    edited November -1
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    Re-enacted. Just love shooting these things too.
    I'm not even a fan of percussion's. [;)]
    Each their own though.
    I'm not a hater. Anyone shooting is a good thing.
    Even in BP season with a 209 primer and 3 pellets.
    From a hunting buddy's experience, they don't go off every time too. [:D]
  • hillbillehillbille Member Posts: 13,115 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I also have a double barrell 12 ga muzzleloader, you can put as much shot as you like, vs powder charge +/- so you can pretty well throw any pattern as big or small as you want depending on what you are hunting, rabbit, squirrell, ect. using #8 shot and about a 1 1/2 ounces of shot, you can spread a patter 20-25 yards that would cover a sheet of plywood,[:D] , helps on those running shots, just takes a little longer to reload,[;)]
  • Fokker TriplaneFokker Triplane Member Posts: 15 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    It's the only way too go! I was about 14 yrs old when my mother give me my first and only long gun. I worked all summer and with that money/ rest from her. My sister,mother and I want to Union City, Tenn to purchase that long rifle. Thats where I met Mr. Turner Kirkland the owner of Dixie Gun Works. My mother,and Mr. Kirkland talked for what it seemed a long time and final we left with a .32cal squiral gun. I can say never shot anything but black powder. It's messy and dirty but it is what I like. Today I get together with some former special ops guys and we target shoot for bragging rights (long range). For that I shoot from a Sharps to a Whitworth to a Zouvea! Now cap and ball pistrols thats another story. In ending I can only say Life is Good . Mike[8D]
  • eastbankeastbank Member Posts: 4,215
    edited November -1
    my wife thinks their like skunks,both stink when you shoot them. any thing to piss her off.
  • lksmith03lksmith03 Member Posts: 1,742 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by carbine100
    Adds to the length of hunting season.

    I get to hunt more.




    Same reason I use BP
  • drsckdrsck Member Posts: 992
    edited November -1
    Everyone has offered great reasons, but there is one more -- NMLRA! The National Muzzleloading Rifle Association (pistols too) is located in Friendship, Ind. but they have chapters in many states and sponsor shoots all over. The western shoot was just a week or so back and it was great. If you're interested in muzzleloaders at all, please consider joining NMLRA. I've been a life member of NRA and lots of other groups over the years, but none have been as great in terms of people, friendship, knowledge, classes, as these folks. Hope to see some of you in Friendship!!
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