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Blowback

old-dogold-dog Member Posts: 209 ✭✭✭
I have several old Colt pistols from around 1900. Three US Army 38 calibers, one US Navy 38 Caliber and two 22 WCF pistols. I have shot most of them at the range and find that a bit of blowback from one or two. Is this normal? Could these revolvers be blowing back some unfired grains of powder? If so, it would seem to me to be a bit dangerous since the grains of powder only need to catch fire to burn my face. Could this be a cartridge malfunction or the gun malfunction? I am using cartridges bought from reputable sources and not reloading my own. Any ideas here?

Comments

  • JohnnyBGoodJohnnyBGood Member Posts: 1,443 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    You MIGHT have a timing issue, where the chambers of the cylinder are not lining up properly with the barrel. Thus, upon firing, the bullets do not go squarely into the forcing cone and some lead gets shaved off and "spits" back in your face. If this is the case, I would not shoot the guns until repaired.

    Johnny
  • bambambambambambam Member Posts: 4,812 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by JohnnyBGood
    You MIGHT have a timing issue, where the chambers of the cylinder are not lining up properly with the barrel. Thus, upon firing, the bullets do not go squarely into the forcing cone and some lead gets shaved off and "spits" back in your face. If this is the case, I would not shoot the guns until repaired.

    Johnny

    +1

    Is it from the nipple area or do you think its like stated above?
  • 1911builderMarine1911builderMarine Member Posts: 48 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    You should check the cylinders for endshake and timing. Endshake is if the cylinder moves back and forth on the cylinder pin.

    A competent Colt pistol smith can repair them....

    Charles.
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