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Need some flintlock help

Sam06Sam06 Member Posts: 21,169 ✭✭✭✭
1. I cannot find any ffffg powder. Can I make it it from ffg or fffg I have plenty of both? Maybe grind in down and if so when will I know it is the right size?

2. Where can I get some lead to cushion the flint in my lock? I have heard it works better than leather.

3. Where can I get some good flints?

4. How do I "tune" the lock to spark the best?

Any help will very appreciated I am getting finished with a gun I am building and I really want to shoot it and maybe harvest a deer before the season ends here in in NC. The gun is a full stock mountain rifle in 54 cal. and I will be shooting .535 round balls with lubed pillow ticking.

Thanks Sam
RLTW

Comments

  • 11b6r11b6r Member Posts: 16,725
    edited November -1
    If you attempt to grind powder, suggest that you use something non-sparking, will not generate static electricity, and that you keep the amounts very small.

    Lead? Find a lead bullet, hammer, ansvil. Lay #1 on #3, apply #2.
  • firstharmonicfirstharmonic Member Posts: 1,020 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    1. Your 3f powder will work just fine for priming; often better than 4f in hunting situations because it is less prone to "clump" in humid conditions.

    2.Hammer a lead ball flat to about the thickness of a nickel and trim as needed with scissors.

    3.Go to Track of the Wolf's website and order English Flints knapped by Tom Fuller of the appropriate size.

    4.Try the lock first to see how it works; tuning a lock is a skill and shouldn't be tried unless it's necessary. So first find out how well the thing works as is. "If it ain't broke don't fix it".
  • Sam06Sam06 Member Posts: 21,169 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by firstharmonic
    1. Your 3f powder will work just fine for priming; often better than 4f in hunting situations because it is less prone to "clump" in humid conditions.

    2.Hammer a lead ball flat to about the thickness of a nickel and trim as needed with scissors.

    3.Go to Track of the Wolf's website and order English Flints knapped by Tom Fuller of the appropriate size.

    4.Try the lock first to see how it works; tuning a lock is a skill and shouldn't be tried unless it's necessary. So first find out how well the thing works as is. "If it ain't broke don't fix it".







    Thanks! I thought about hammering a ball flat but I was not sure if it would end up big enough. I went out in the garage this morning and tried it. It got huge. The lock is sparking well with the flint I have in it now so I will leave it alone. I will check out those flints and order a few that will fit my gun

    thanks again

    Sam
    RLTW

  • flyingcollieflyingcollie Member Posts: 197 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Try Dixie Gun Works, or Track of the Wolf for flints.

    ??? Now I have a question . . . FFg, FFFg, or FFFFg are screened to grain size, but I have no idea what meshes relate to the screens ?? Safest way to grind BP to a finer grit is in a ceramic mortar and pestle . . . you can get a student lab grade setup for very little $ at Edmund Scientific.
  • stegsteg Member Posts: 871 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I do not recommend trying to grind down blackpowder, even with a morter and pestle. All grinding creates hear due to friction, no matter how it's done.
    Powder mills have specialized equipment to do this, and they have years of experience at doing this safely. quite frankly, you don't.
    I suggest you contact Dixon muzzle loading store in Kempton, Pa. They have everything for muzzle loading in stock, including soft lead and all grades of powder. They have a web site, but I suggest telephoning them about shipping you powder.
  • navc130navc130 Member Posts: 1,017 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Test your lock with FFFG powder. If it ignites (and it should), you do not need FFFFG priming powder. They did not use a finer priming powder in the 1700 and 1800's. Keeping it DRY is the key.
  • hillbillehillbille Member Posts: 13,135 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I shoot and prime with FFF, in not only my flintlock but also my pistol and I also use it in my inlines, just reduce the initial charge a bit and you will never know the difference. Also do not fill the priming pan full of powder, just a pinch will do, the more you put in the bigger the " flash " and the harder it is to keep from flinching. The flinching is something you try to get used to, not sure if everyone can. good luck........
    while I am no expert I did get my first deer last monday with my flintlock, I am still learning myself, but I enjoy the challenge over the ease of a inline.
  • anderskandersk Member Posts: 3,825
    edited November -1
    I grind down fffg Goex BP all the time and it seems to work fine. My problem is learning to knap (is that the word) to flint properly.
  • anderskandersk Member Posts: 3,825
    edited November -1
    On the subject of "flintlock help" ... would someone (or everyone) give me their best advice on knapping flints. I have a Kentucky pistol that I love shooting. And having to deal with ignition problems has made me a better shooter, but I think I need some scoop ... anything from the basics to the fine tuning ideas?

    Or an article on the subject would be nice, too.
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