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Best way to apply patch lube

rja72rja72 Member Posts: 141 ✭✭✭
I got some pillow ticking all cut into squares and wanted to make up some prelubed patches. I sat down on the couch and applied a little lube (wonder lube plus) to each patch on one side and stacked them one on top of the other. I put them in the dash of my car today to get that lube all running hoping it wold sink in good. Not sure if I applied enough lube to each patch, but i can add more if needed.

Anybody do it differently than that?

Comments

  • anderskandersk Member Posts: 3,825
    edited November -1
    That sounds like a great idea ... I'm going to try it myself!
  • Underdog2264Underdog2264 Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    You don't have to go to that much trouble. I take my patches and put them in an old prescription bottle about the same size as the patches, (about 2/3 full) and fill the rest of the way with bore butter. Then do the same as you, put out in the sun or on top of the clothes dryer. It usually comes out just right. If not add more patches to soak up extra lube, or add a bit more lube and re-heat.
  • Underdog2264Underdog2264 Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    This also works well for cleaning patches, just soak patches in the prescription bottle with whatever cleaner you use, ( I use T/C #13 bore cleaner, no need for heating ) and keep it in your possibles bag or hunting pouch. They work great for between shot swabs and fouling busters.
  • rja72rja72 Member Posts: 141 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks Underdog. Thats sounds much easier.
  • oldgunneroldgunner Member Posts: 2,466 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Just goes to show you..We can all learn new things. I've always done each patch separately by rubbing the lube into them. I'm glad I read this one, you've cut my prep time to a fraction of what it was. Why did I never think of that??
  • iceracerxiceracerx Member Posts: 8,872 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    What's wrong with SPIT? It worked for the original (19th century) riflemen.
  • Underdog2264Underdog2264 Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Nothing wrong with spitballs, but after the third or fourth shot I run out of "lube", and I can only imagine the ridicule I would get from the family if I were to collect cups of spit all week. [:D]
  • rja72rja72 Member Posts: 141 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I do use spit most of the time for the range. I wanted a patch for hunting.
  • Underdog2264Underdog2264 Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Spit is actually a great lube for a quick shot, but tends to dry out if left in the barrel. It was very effective for soldiers during the 17-1800s, but most hunters used some type of "lube". Everything from whale oil to animal fat, to sea weed. But the neatest load I came across was used by the Spanish and French. They would use silk and olive oil for there patches. The claim was that it would give an extra 20 or so yards of accurate flight and required less cleaning. Silk had also been used with mini ball type loads by some in the fur trade era. I did try the silk and olive oil on a round ball, and didn't notice any more range, (tough to tell at the range) but loading and cleaning were a bit easier.
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