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traditions 32cal. Deerhunter?

22sport22sport Member Posts: 36 ✭✭
I have wanted a 32 or 36 rifle and they are hard to find. The other day I saw a 32 in a catalog. It has a round, short barrel--do any of you shoot one or know someone who does?

Comments

  • allen griggsallen griggs Member Posts: 34,336 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I am not sure what you are looking for, but here is one from Dixie:

    http://www.dixiegunworks.com/product_info.php?products_id=11601

    They have two other .32 rifles, probably have some in .36, search the Dixie site.
  • 22sport22sport Member Posts: 36 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks for the reply- They have some great accessories too.
  • mongrel1776mongrel1776 Member Posts: 894 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I finally had a chance to fondle the Traditions Crockett rifle, at the Friendship Nationals last week. I already have a .32 rifle (two if you count my .323" bored 8x57 Mauser[:D]), but the Crockett is sweet to handle. I'm partial to longer guns. My own .32 is built around a 39" Hatfield barrel.

    Hope you find something that tickles your fancy, or gives you a fancy tickle -- whichever.
  • oldgunneroldgunner Member Posts: 2,466 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Sure..I have one of each. The .36 has a synthetic stock and is ugly, and has no advantage I can find over the .32, which is a no longer manufactured CVA squirrel rifle that I rebuilt to suit myself. Actually I think it's called .31 cal, but I ain't gonna be hard ta talk to..hehe.

    I use it for..well..squirrels. It works great, recoils like a .22, smokes like a BP cannon. I love it.
  • Underdog2264Underdog2264 Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    .32s and .36s are great fun! I have a TC 32 Cherokee and a 36 Seneca as well as a 32 traditions Deerhunter. All are A blast to shoot and are cheaper in the long run. I use 35-40 grains for target and 60 for squirrel or rabbit popping. I would like a longer barrel than the Deerhunter has but for short range 50 to 75 yards it's great. And yes it still has the unmistakable boom and cloud of smoke, but with very minor recoil and a lighter carry weight.
  • anderskandersk Member Posts: 3,825
    edited November -1
    Last time I was out to Scheels in Iowa City I, too, got my hands on a Traditions Davy Crockett muzzle loader. I think it was in .32 calibre. Man what a nice feeling and looking muzzle loader. I even thought, how it the world do they do this! It wasn't at all like the typical barrel heavy muzzle loader. Great looking sights, too!

    I'm sure that it would be fun (and economical, too!) to shoot, but I would think it is on the light side for deer unless you get up close & personal and practice enough so that your shot placement is on the money ALL the time!
  • Underdog2264Underdog2264 Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The little 32s and 36s will surprise you, even though you are throwing far less lead. They are quite capable of reaching out to 100 yards and dropping a deer, fox or bobcat. My brother has taken all sorts of game with his .32 and .36, I have taken deer with my .36 Seneca. I had taken it along for squirrel hunting after I got my deer, and I didn't intend to use it to hunt deer, but a lock malfunction on the .45 changed that. I loaded the 36 with 75 grains of 2f and a 80 grain patched R/B. Well long story short, at 85 yards the shot dropped an 8 point just as well as any .45 -.50 I had ever used. Turns out that 75 grains of powder was a bit overkill also, later testing showed that 70 gr gave the same M/V as 75gr.( 2 to 5 FPS less) I always take the Seneca with me now as a back up, or a primary if only roundball is permitted, and would recommend it for hunting any mid size non-dangerous game. Just remember that the "knock down" power is less so a good chest shot is essential.
  • mazo kidmazo kid Member Posts: 648 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Many states have minimum caliber requirements for muzzleloading rifles for deer hunting; others have energy minimums. While it is possible to drop a deer with a .36 cal rifle, the chances for just wounding it are great. Emery
  • Underdog2264Underdog2264 Member Posts: 164 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Very true, most states require a minimum of .45 cal and or 1250 fps. Small caliber hunting is not for the novice BP shooter, or the person not willing to take the time to practice there hunting, tracking and shooting skills. There are some Private game clubs in the US and many other locations worldwide that will allow small caliber hunting of large game. It can get a bit pricey but well worth it.
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