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owners manual for Pietta 1851 Navy

epakerepaker Member Posts: 61 ✭✭
Can anyone tell me where I might get an owners manual for an Pietta 1851 Navy? a photocopied or downloaded one would do. I just pick ed the gun up at a pawn shop, to cheap to pass up but no box, manual, etc. I have always liked the Colt Navy and this looks like a nice replica but I don't know much about black powder revolers so any opinions are welcome too. Thanks, Ed.

Comments

  • R D HenryR D Henry Member Posts: 190 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    There really isn't much to the paperwork that comes with all their guns. Mostly just a booklet that shows the product line, and a pamphlet that tells you how to load and shoot, clean-up, etc.

    If you want an exploded view of the parts, or need to order something, try these guys...great to deal with.

    http://vtigunparts.com/

    Just click on Pietta, then 1851 Navy...takes you right to it! [;)]

    Cabelas also sells the Pietta line, if you have one in your area. I have 6 Piettas and 1 Uberti...I love em!
  • epakerepaker Member Posts: 61 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks, I will look them up. I had a Ruger old army for about a week but someone offered me twice what I paid for it so I sold it without ever firing it. I plan to keep this one so it will be my first BP revolver. The gun is beautiful, looks new except for a faint spin mark and it was $85 out the door. How could I say no? I just need to figure out how much powder to use, etc so I don't muck it up. that is really why I want a manual. I still have a manual I downloaded for the old army, which was a .44 also and it looks like the loading procedure should be similar but the guns are very different so I just want to be sure.
  • HandgunHTR52HandgunHTR52 Member Posts: 2,735
    edited November -1
    Is it a brass or steel frame?

    If brass, then I would stick to a max of 30 grains of FFFg.
    If steel, then you can go up to 35 grains.

    .451-.454 round balls. You should get a little ring of lead when you load the ball.

    Put lube over the chamber after you load the ball. This will prevent chain firing. Another option, instead of putting lube over the ball (this can get messy) is to use an over the powder wad. Cabelas sells a couple of different kinds.

    Put caps on the nipples and fire away!

    P.S. If you plan on carrying it, only load 5 chambers and keep the hammer lowered on the empty chamber.
  • Spider7115Spider7115 Member, Moderator Posts: 29,599 ******
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by HandgunHTR52
    Is it a brass or steel frame?

    If brass, then I would stick to a max of 30 grains of FFFg.
    If steel, then you can go up to 35 grains.

    .451-.454 round balls. You should get a little ring of lead when you load the ball.

    Put lube over the chamber after you load the ball. This will prevent chain firing. Another option, instead of putting lube over the ball (this can get messy) is to use an over the powder wad. Cabelas sells a couple of different kinds.

    Put caps on the nipples and fire away!

    P.S. If you plan on carrying it, only load 5 chambers and keep the hammer lowered on the empty chamber.

    If it's a replica 1851 Navy, it should be .36 caliber and not .44. You should use .360 to .375 balls and 22-25 grains of powder. You can download a Colt blackpowder manual here: http://stevespages.com/pdf/colt_cap_&_ball_revolvers.pdf
  • allen griggsallen griggs Member Posts: 32,935 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Lots of guys put grease or lube on top of the cylinder after loading to prevent chain fires.
    I don't believe this is necessary.
    I like to look at how these guns were used in the 19th century. It is hard for me to believe that Jeb Stuart's troopers were riding around in Virginia in August with their pistols loaded like this, with melting grease running down their holsters and down their pants.
    I bet the civil war troopers used a felt wad over the powder, and that is what I use. Never had a chain fire.
  • Spider7115Spider7115 Member, Moderator Posts: 29,599 ******
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by allen griggs
    Lots of guys put grease or lube on top of the cylinder after loading to prevent chain fires.
    I don't believe this is necessary.
    I like to look at how these guns were used in the 19th century. It is for me to believe that Jeb Stuart's troopers were riding around in Virginia in August with their pistols loaded like this, with melting grease running down their holsters and down their pants.
    I bet the civil war troopers used a felt wad over the powder, and that is what I use. Never had a chain fire.

    Actually, although it's safer to use a felt wad, I don't believe the troopers used anything other than the compression of the ball. In battle, there was little time to do any more than necessary to fire their revolvers as quickly as possible.
  • HandgunHTR52HandgunHTR52 Member Posts: 2,735
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Spider7115
    quote:Originally posted by HandgunHTR52
    Is it a brass or steel frame?

    If brass, then I would stick to a max of 30 grains of FFFg.
    If steel, then you can go up to 35 grains.

    .451-.454 round balls. You should get a little ring of lead when you load the ball.

    Put lube over the chamber after you load the ball. This will prevent chain firing. Another option, instead of putting lube over the ball (this can get messy) is to use an over the powder wad. Cabelas sells a couple of different kinds.

    Put caps on the nipples and fire away!

    P.S. If you plan on carrying it, only load 5 chambers and keep the hammer lowered on the empty chamber.

    If it's a replica 1851 Navy, it should be .36 caliber and not .44. You should use .360 to .375 balls and 22-25 grains of powder. You can download a Colt blackpowder manual here: http://stevespages.com/pdf/colt_cap_&_ball_revolvers.pdf


    Spider, thanks for the back-up. You are correct. I read it as 1861 not 1851.
    For what balls to use, the best method is to mic the chamber and get a ball .002-.005 over what you measure. What I said in my other post about getting a little ring of lead still applies.
  • epakerepaker Member Posts: 61 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Ok great info! it is a brass frame, at least the trigger guard and backstrap are brass, the reciever is case color and I think it is steel. it is a model 1851 but it is .44 cal, I know (now) that this is not historically accurate but I really don't care, I like the gun and it LOOKS like a colt navy even if it isn't the right calibre, I guess I am just not that much of a purist. Also, if I want to dissassemble it for cleaning it looks like I remove the wedge screw, pull out the wedge/spring/pin assembly and the the spindle should slide out so I can remove the cylinder. Does this sound right? The exploded view kind of helps, but again, I don't want to muck anything up. Thanks for the help so far, it is noce to have a place to ask these questions and get answers so quickly!
  • allen griggsallen griggs Member Posts: 32,935 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Your revolver has a steel frame.
    I have a .44 Pietta and I like the .457 round ball. It fits a little tighter than the .454 and I like the tighter fit.


    Here is a post from graybeardoutdoors.com


    Colt disassembly
    ? on: June 18, 2007, 07:12:54 PM ?
    Reply with quote
    Dismounting Post-1850 Colt Revolvers

    Basic:

    1. Place unloaded revolver on half cock
    2. Push Barrel Wedge to the left. It will either stop against the retaining screw or come all the way out. This varies.
    3 pull barrel assembly off the frame and cylinder off the arbor.
    4. Unscrew nipples for cleaning.

    Complete:

    1. Remove back strap section of the grip frame. Screws are on either side of the hammer and on the bottom of the grip frame assembly.
    2. Loosen and/or remove the main spring;
    3. Remove front of grip frame/trigger guard - three screws.
    4. Remove Trigger bolt spring now visible in the bottom of the action.
    5. Remove cylinder bolt and then trigger held by identical screws.
    6. Remove hammer screw and then hammer and hand assembly through the bottom of the frame.
    Remounting:

    1. Replace hammer and hand first being careful not to compress or overstress the hand spring'
    2. Replace locking bolt. It is necessary for the split "ears" on the rear of the hand to ride in front of the cam on the right side of the hammer. This is best accomplished by placing the hammer in its lowered (forward ) position. The outside "ear" presses against the inside of the frame while the active side presses against the hammer in front of the hammer cam.
    3. Replace Trigger. This is easiest with the hammer pulled back.
    4. Replace trigger /bolt spring being sure that the long "finger" is on the step on the front of the trigger. Some springs appear to be too short to replace. In this case, index the long "finger"/leaf of the spring against the step on the trigger and press down so that it will stretch out and allow replacement of the screw.
    5. Replace front porton of grip frame and the main spring. It is often best to leave some slack in the screws-including the mainspring screw- until everything is in position. then tighten all screws.
    6. Replace grip and back strap of grip frame. This may require loosening the screws of the front portion of the grip frame just to get all the screws lined up.

    In principal: Avoid overtightening the screws and the nipples. It's easier to tighten them often than to watch one crumble before your eyes because it's frozen in place.

    Frequently, the Italian assembler will set at least one of the screws in place under massive impact. Your Job- have the best fitting screwdriver possible on hand ;and, Figure out which screw it is.

    Attached Thumbnails:


    The above is a replacement for the withdrawn posting mec had here. It is a different website, but the information is the same, and includes the thumbnailks referred to above. Other than for the value of the thumbnails, I would not normally lead anyone off to a different website, if you look over there, be sure to come back.

    http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=137102
  • rgergergerge Member Posts: 183 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    This guy on gunbroker might be able to help you;"rediscover shooting treasures" He has repro manuals for just about everything except TCA
  • rgergergerge Member Posts: 183 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have a very early Uberti, sn# under 1200 '51 navy in .36, and I use .375 balls I cast myself, never had a chain fire in 22 years. However, I have a Griwald and Gunison in .44 that will chain fire with .44 balls, so I moved up to .451 they are kind of a beeach to load, should I get a loading stand?[8]
  • Wolf.Wolf. Member Posts: 2,223 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    --
    FORGET THE MANUAL. It is basically a cover-your-* document that will give you some of, but not all of the information you have been given here already. It probably won't have much or any information as far as loading charges, round-ball bullet diameter, etc.

    My tip to you is NEVER use a petroleum-based grease, oils, other lubricants, or cleaning proucts on a black powder gun. Even if you purchase commercial "black powder" products to clean and maintain your revolver, make sure you know what's in them. Petroleum-based products, when mixed with burned black powder or black powder substitute residue will turn to asphalt and will gunk up your revolver very quickly, forcing you to clean it after about twenty shots or so. As was stated earlier, it is usually suggested that you smear some kind of grease (the usual suggestion is Crisco) over the front of the loaded cylinder chambers to prevent chain fires. if you do this, the result is a huge mess.

    The problem with felt wads or any other commercial wad products like this is that they add 3-6 cents to the cost of every shot. Find out what size wad you need and buy an impact-style cutter. punch your wads out of milk carton, carboard or cheap felt from the home center. You could even go to the thrift store and buy a heavy flannel shirt and punch a thousand wads out of it.
  • epakerepaker Member Posts: 61 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    thanks everyone for some great info! I have to concur that this is better than what I would have gotten from the manual. one last question if anyone can answer it. in looking at the online info about these guns I see a model with a 7.5 or 5.5 inch barrel and a "sheriff's model" with a 4.5 inch barrel. the barrel on this one, measured fron the front of the cylinder is 4 and 7/8 inches long. Can anyone shed some light on what I actually have? is this another model that I just haven't seen up for sale? I ask because I am interested in CASS, I already have a pair of Vaqueros and I thought it might be nice to have a pair of these to maybe compete in bp but I would like them to match if possible.
  • rgergergerge Member Posts: 183 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If it's .36 cal it could be a pocket pistol, is it a five shot?
  • epakerepaker Member Posts: 61 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    44 cal, 6 shot, it is model 1851 I just cant seem to find another one with this barrel length. or maybe I am measuring it wrong?
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