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  • navc130navc130 Member Posts: 1,185 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    You have neglected to show the top and the bottom of the barrel where the manufacturers name is usually stamped.
  • Robert E AginRobert E Agin Member Posts: 4 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    The top of the barrel has "EIS NAVY" stamped on it. The bottom and sides have nothing.
  • navc130navc130 Member Posts: 1,185 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    EIS "may" be Euroarms Italia S.r.l. formerly known as Armi San Paolo prior to 2002. Be advised that brass frames are the lowest priced revolvers. The experts say they will eventually "shoot loose," because the brass stretchs in the areas of stress, like where the cylinder pin is attached to the frame. How many rounds fired - don't know.
  • ken44-40ken44-40 Member Posts: 201 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    From the markings on the backstraap, it is an Italian made revolver by a company/manugfacturing group with the GB marking that was imported by EIG. Dr. JL Davis at RPRCA hasn't been able to identify what the GB means.

    The following was taken from a Firing Line thread from 2009 and explains who EIG was.

    The concentric circles with the cross hairs are EIG. After WWII, Italy along with the rest of Europe was in ruins. Most of the factories were turned into parking lots by American and British bombers. Under the Marshall plan, American industry helped to restore the economy by building new production lines and equipment and finding markets for the products. One of the products was a copy of the Chiefs Special ( I believe it was even called EIG"S Chief Special ) and imported it to the States. Who made it, hard to tell, most of the new factories didn't even have a name. What is known is that Samuel Eig's EIG Cutlery Imported some of the most inexpensive firearms known to man ( see, I didn't even use the word cheap or junk ) Firearms were imported from Germany { Rohm's RG-10 } Italy and Japan. The revolvers from Japan seem to be the best, at least they have a better appearance.. The Marshall plan was very complex and the information above was very simplistic, do not take it to heart. The little 38 from Italy was a very rough copy of the S&W Model 36, the Chief's Special.

    Tanfoglio as a possibile maker as Eig is known to have imported extensively from this Italian company. Around the time of the Gun Control Act of 1968 it appears Eig, who would have been prevented from importing foreign "Saturday Night Specials", were negociating with Roehm Gesellschaft (RG) and Tanfoglio to set up an assembly plant in the US. Apparently the New York Times estimated Eig's capacity to produce 200,000 handguns per year using Italian technicians. In the 1980s the Hills Corporation, as successor to Eigs, were sued due to an accident involving a Tanfoglio deringer.

    The XXII marking on the barrel means it was made in 1966.
  • bprevolverbprevolver Member Posts: 153 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I am sure the barrel markings are EIG not EIS. EIG is the name of the distributor who imported these guns. This company went out of business do to one of the "consumer" law suits. Left over inventory was purchased by FIE in Florida. It is interesting to note that the Schneider & Glassick revolvers imported by EIG were among the first historically correct replicas. No engraving on cylinder and octagon barrel. It is also interesting to note that the Blue Book has been listing the Schneider & Glassick revolvers made by Uberti as an Augusta Armory with brass frame. Since the Augusta Armory did not make brass frame revolver during the Civil War this is a gross mistake. I don't really think that the Confederate States manufacturing revolvers during the Civil War would take the time to put the Colt engravings on their cylinders. It is my understanding that the Leech & Rigdon revolvers sold by Dixie Gun Works have the Colt engraving on their cylinder. I haven't seen one but a collector interested in having an historically correct revolvers told me this. Anyone have one of these?
  • Litl RoosterLitl Rooster Member Posts: 13 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Mr. Agin, did you looking under the loading lever for additional markings?
  • Robert E AginRobert E Agin Member Posts: 4 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yes I did and there was nothing. I appreciate all the input I have received. Everyone has been very helpful.
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