In order to participate in the GunBroker Member forums, you must be logged in with your GunBroker.com account. Click the sign-in button at the top right of the forums page to get connected.

Colt SAA in 44-40 or 45?

1988z011988z01 Member Posts: 602 ✭✭✭✭
Hey Folks:

Looking into adding another Pony to the stable. I don't have either caliber, and was looking for a few experienced opinions. Info on accuracy, recoil, and anything else you can think of would be appreciated.

Comments

  • Winston BodeWinston Bode Member Posts: 1,628 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Personally, I prefer the .44-40, (44WCF), but that is just me.

    Bode
  • eastbankeastbank Member Posts: 4,215
    edited November -1
    i like the 44-40 and have three of them. eastbank.
  • ken44-40ken44-40 Member Posts: 201 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Another vote for the 44-40 here.

    FM
  • longspur riderlongspur rider Member Posts: 2,620 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have some of each & prefer the 44-40. I tend to be more accurate with that caliber. Could just be the firearms they are fired from.
  • Winston BodeWinston Bode Member Posts: 1,628 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The tappered cartridge, although slight, will seal the chamber and prevent a lot of gases from comeing back and stainig your brass like you see on a lot of the .45 colt ammo.

    You'll hear a lot of bunk about the 44-40 being hard to load for and crushed case mouths, blah, blah, blah.

    I started reloading with the 44-40 and had very few if any crushed case mouths. I loved casting my own bullets and loadig my own ammo.

    Again, I favor the 44-40 over the .45 because most people don't like the caliber or are afraid of it because of all the mis-information out there about it.

    Bode
  • eastbankeastbank Member Posts: 4,215
    edited November -1
    i agree with bode, i load all the 92 win shells, 25-20,32-20,38-40 and the 44-40 and do not lose many cases to loading. i use a good expander die and crimp in a seperate operation,and shoot mostly cast lead bullets. my rifles range from model 94 marlins, model 92 and 53 winchesters, remington model 14 1/2,s and a cd little sharps. takeing a little time and care goes a long way to ex reloaded ammo. eastbank.
  • PA ShootistPA Shootist Member Posts: 686 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I find the ease of reloading the straight-walled .45 for which carbide resizing dies are available, as opposed to lubing and wiping tapered cases, trumps all other considerations. Except for low-volume reloading, of course, where it might not be such a big deal.
  • eastbankeastbank Member Posts: 4,215
    edited November -1
    i just spray my cases with dillon lube(it drys quick) and have at it. i put several hundred cases in a cardboard box and shake it while spraying the cases,maybe 2-3 minutes at most. it,s not much extra work realy. i have to admit i like the original old shells in my old rifles, and as the 45 colt was not chambered in them,i just pass on .45 colt in rifles,now in my revolvers its a different matter. eastbank.
  • Winston BodeWinston Bode Member Posts: 1,628 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I stopped lubing my 44-40 cases after being told it was not necessary. I know the case is tapered but I never had a case stick for lack of lubrication. Try it, you'll be amazed and it will save you time and money!!!
  • v35v35 Member Posts: 12,710 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I like the 44-40 because it loads and ejects faster than straight walled cartridges in SAA type revolvers. It can also be loaded plenty hot.
    Look at Colt's prewar production figures for other than 45LC.
    The bottle necked cartridges handload slower than 45 and other straight walled cartridges.
Sign In or Register to comment.