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Need gunsmithing advice on 2 gen colt

muzzleloader-2muzzleloader-2 Member Posts: 58 ✭✭
I recently aquaired a 2nd gen colt pocket navey here at GB that has a slight problem with the barrel wedge. The wedge barley engages the opposide side of the wedge slot which is not a good thing. If I tap it completley thru with a wood mallet so that it is at least flush with outside of the wedge slot it forces the barrel cone snug to the cylinder and it will not turn. My question is what can I do to resolve this issue? Should I file some off the wedge or the wedge slot. Any help would be much appreciated.

Comments

  • Lonewolf77Lonewolf77 Member Posts: 339 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by muzzleloader-2
    I recently aquaired a 2nd gen colt pocket navey here at GB that has a slight problem with the barrel wedge. The wedge barley engages the opposide side of the wedge slot which is not a good thing. If I tap it completley thru with a wood mallet so that it is at least flush with outside of the wedge slot it forces the barrel cone snug to the cylinder and it will not turn. My question is what can I do to resolve this issue? Should I file some off the wedge or the wedge slot. Any help would be much appreciated.
    is your set screw perhaps too far out? thats the screw that actually holds the wedge to the gun? if so u can try turning it in half turn all you have to do is make sure the spring 'lip" engages the other edge or side of the slot. do NOT under any circumstances go filing or prying or otherwise messin with the gun, itll ruin finish as well as collector value. QUESTION you said wedge is going in TOO FAR? and binding the action? there is one fix I can suggest IF thers no number on that wedge and that would be going on GB and try to find another wedge, those guns were contrary to belief NOT made in America, but Italy by Uberti, under license I owned a 61 colt navy that would skip on the cylinder when id cycle it so theyre not beyond dimentional machining issues.beyond all this tho id recomend you taking a pleasant drive down to your local QUALIFIED gunsmith.
  • ken44-40ken44-40 Member Posts: 201 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    muzzleloader-2, File some off of the wedge. If you go too far, it's easier to replace than the arbor is. Take it slow so you don't go too far, then a little cold blue will finish the job.

    Lonewolf77, Contrary to your erroneous belief about the pedigree of 2nd Gen Colt BP firearms. They were made in the USA (C series in Hartford, CT and F series in Middlesex, NJ) from Italian and American parts. They were not made by Uberti under license from Colt. The Sig series guns were made by Colt Blackpowder Arms in Brooklyn NY under license from Colt.
  • KnifecollectorKnifecollector Member Posts: 3,258 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Always make adjustments to the wedge, not the wedge slot.
  • v35v35 Member Posts: 13,200
    edited November -1
    In the '50's, I rebuilt a real disaster of an 1860 Colt.
    I got a new cylinder and hammer from Dixie and made a new hardened wedge.
    I filed the wedge hole and fit the wedge so the wedge shoulder went completely flush to the frame. The cylinder gap was not adjustable. The wedge was made without a wedge screw cut or spring. The fit was snug, taking a slight tapping to install or remove.
    I'm now recalling, I filed the slots flush in the pin and barrel, fore and aft so the barrel couldn't move forward or backward with the wedge in place. The gun was tight, having no motion between frame and barrel.
    I forget what cylinder gap I used but I did a great deal of shooting without the wedge coming out or the gun loosening up or gumming up at the gap. The gun was very accurate at long range plinking.
    In your shoes, I'd buy a new wedge and file it so when it's all the way home the gap is correct.
  • odenthevikingodentheviking Member Posts: 523 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    OK, I may be way off here, but.........

    Years ago when I would re-build problem BP pistols,(its a long story), often the cylinder/barrel gap was too wide or too tight. I would not file the wedge or anything else i remember. Not sure of the real names here, but..... the round rod that the cylinder spins on can be screwed in and out of the frame of the pistol. Normally just turning it a half turn until the cylinder/barrel gap was correct was all it took.
    This may or may not be true of Colts, but it sure works on the other repro brands!
  • dsmc1dsmc1 Member Posts: 112 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I'm no expert, but wouldn't loosening the center pin by turning it out 1/2 or worse, a full turn weaken the stability of the pin? Seems there is a lot of pressure on that pin, since that's what holds the barrel onto the frame. If that pin starts to wobble where it engages the threaded hole in the frame, the threads will start to deform and eventually strip, unless you place a shim between the shoulder of the centerpin and the frame so it stays snug, but you are still reducing the amount of thread contact.

    I would go with filing the wedge first. Just my opinion. Have rebuilt several that way.
    Dave
  • machine gun moranmachine gun moran Member Posts: 5,198
    edited November -1
    Ken44-40, I believe that the manufacture of the initial Colt 2nd Gen BP guns was under the direction of Lou Imperato, with major parts being imported in the rough from Italy and the small parts, assembly, and finishing being done by Iver Johnson personnel. As you said, that would qualify the guns as being U.S. made, and I, also, don't think that Uberti ever made any guns under license from Colt. And, apparently, the manufacture underwent a transition, with the components becoming (essentially) all-U.S. made.
  • ken44-40ken44-40 Member Posts: 201 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by machine gun moran
    Ken44-40, I believe that the manufacture of the initial Colt 2nd Gen BP guns was under the direction of Lou Imperato, with major parts being imported in the rough from Italy and the small parts, assembly, and finishing being done by Iver Johnson personnel. As you said, that would qualify the guns as being U.S. made, and I, also, don't think that Uberti ever made any guns under license from Colt. And, apparently, the manufacture underwent a transition, with the components becoming (essentially) all-U.S. made.


    The C series 2nd Gen were manufactured in Hartford CT by Colt's empoyees. Initially, the parts sets were supplied by Val Forgett's Navy Arms CO. (1971-1973). Beginning in 1973 and thru 1976, Lou Imperato's Iver Johnson Arms CO provided the parts sets. Statring in late 1977, Colt's contracted with Lou Imperato and Iver johnson to begin making the F series 2nd Gen's in Iver Johnson's Middlesex NJ plant.
  • dandak1dandak1 Member Posts: 450 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The arbor is held in with a pin that drives out from the rear of the gun, that must be taken out before you try to rotate the arbor in or out. I agree with others tho....work on the wedge.
    Ken, I cannot get an email to get thru to you...is the problem on my end or yours???
  • ken44-40ken44-40 Member Posts: 201 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by dandak1
    The arbor is held in with a pin that drives out from the rear of the gun, that must be taken out before you try to rotate the arbor in or out. I agree with others tho....work on the wedge.
    Ken, I cannot get an email to get thru to you...is the problem on my end or yours???


    Good question. I'm getting my usual emails. Address is [email protected]
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