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Colt 3rd model Dragoon

cashherecashhere Member Posts: 27 ✭✭
I just put a 2nd generation Colt 3rd model Dragoon in layaway today at a local shop, has the black box and un-fired. I am very excited to buy such a beautiful piece. Can anyone shed any light as to the loads and such about one of these? I am not a collector and I plan on enjoying the revolver. Hell I am getting close to that age where I won't buy green bananas LOL. Seriously any info on this will be appreciated, Thanks...Dave

Comments

  • navc130navc130 Member Posts: 970 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    That revolver will handle any amount of powder and ball combination that you can load into it. For light loads you can use cornmeal as a filler between powder and ball. The ball must be a tight fit, i.e., it leaves a lead ring when you ram it down. If you are not an experienced black powder shooter, I strongly recommend you read up on handling and shooting black powder SAFELY. The LYMAN BLACK POWDER book is very good.
  • stegsteg Member Posts: 871 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The 2nd generation Colt instruction manual states: "To fire the Dragoon, use No. 11 percussion caps, .456 inch diameter lead balls or bullets, and a Black Powder charge of 35 to 40 grains; we recommend 37 grains for each chamber."
    If you don't have a factory instruction manual with your Dragoon, I strongly suggest that you find and buy one on e-Bay.
  • cashherecashhere Member Posts: 27 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks guys, I have shot a few diff 1858 Remington clones and a few Rugers BP's. I have read some rather negative stuff relative to the accuracy of this type vs. the Remington 1858, I am hoping it is not the case. I am paying more for this than I have ever paid for a BP revolver. I have done committed to buy the Dragoon, maybe I read too much stuff. The box has the manual and all in it. The shop that has it acts as it were gold.
  • andrewsw16andrewsw16 Member Posts: 10,729 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    That design is fine and will be as accurate as YOU are. My 1851 Navy replica can hit clay birds standing up in the sand at 50 yards one shot after the next. Just experiment with different loads until you find the one your gun likes. Happy shooting. [:D]
  • cashherecashhere Member Posts: 27 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    That is great to hear. I have never owned the open top type BP revolver, but have always wanted one. I am like a kid waiting for Christmas, trying to sell off a few things to get the funds(always seem to have to sell toys to afford different toys. LOL
  • Spider7115Spider7115 Member, Moderator Posts: 29,703 ******
    edited November -1
    That's one heavy revolver! The Colt "Dragoon" was carried in saddle holsters and was much too heavy for infantry use or carrying in a belt holster. That problem lead to the development of the 1851 Navy and 1860 Army models.

    I hope you have strong wrists! [;)]
  • cashherecashhere Member Posts: 27 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I think I will be OK unless I go for a marathon shoot LOL!, it for sure is a hefty. I am staring to think about just turning it instead of keeping and shooting it, since it is un-fired. I am too compulsive, I just move too fast sometimes. Its just such a nice piece, I am a sucker for the old looking firearms.
  • machine gun moranmachine gun moran Member Posts: 5,198
    edited November -1
    The Colt design has excellent accuracy potential. I had about the same experience with an 1851 repro that andrewsw16 did, in that I once hit a starling that was sitting on an upright lath at a (later) measured distance of two feet short of 50 yards. I knew by then that the gun could do it, I just didn't know if I could. Also, I believe that Wild Bill Hickock once made a headshot at about 70 yards on an adversary, with an 1851 Navy.

    I'm at that age now where I shoot anything, no matter how pretty or perfect it is. I just bought a beautiful new 1851 London repro, and posterity will just have to settle for getting a used gun out of it.

    BTW, and I don't recommend this, I once experimented with two-ball loads in an 1860 Army replica. The gas pressure that vented out of the nipple hole blew the hammer back almost to the full-cock position, and the hammer then fell forward again, although the cylinder was not quite indexed for the next shot. If it had reached full index, the next chamber would have been fired. I'm no doubt not the first guy to this, I wonder how many revolvers went full auto during the Civil War, with some guy using nutzo-loads [:D][8][}:)].
  • cashherecashhere Member Posts: 27 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks for the info, I keep coming back to this post enjoying the comments and info. Hope info and stories will keep coming..Dave
  • dandak1dandak1 Member Posts: 450 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Since your prior experience is with closed frames, you should see a big positive with the open top frame of the Colts, and that is that when a cap shard gets wedged between the nipple and the cylinder, it is WAY easier to get it out if the frame is of the open top variety. Just be very careful when doing this if to make sure the gun points in a safe direction. i know with my old remington cap frags caused a real pain...
    I love those 2nd and 3rd gen Colts.
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