.

Brass vs Steel Frames

odenthevikingodentheviking Member Posts: 523 ✭✭✭
OK, clearly a steel frame is stronger than a brass frame, but why do all cylinder conversion companies say that thier cylinders are NOT to be used in brass frame pistols? If you use the required ammo,(Cowboy Action 45 Schofield, 38 S&W, 32 Short Colt, etc....), are the pressures on these pistols this high? Alright I can see an open top model, but what about a Brass frame 1858 Remington?
Not strong enough to use Cowboy Action loads???

Comments

  • cbyerlycbyerly Member Posts: 703 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    The cylinder post is screwed into the frame. On brass frames, it will shoot loose and there is no way to correct it. I know! I had a cap and ball that has shot loose and I tried to silver solder it in place. Bad idea! The heat warped the frame and destroyed it. Stay away from any brass frame guns!
  • odenthevikingodentheviking Member Posts: 523 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I can understand that, on the open tops,(like Colts), there is alot of pressure on the frame/cylinder bolt. So on the Remington mdls will it start to key hole the frame?
  • ZinderblocZinderbloc Member Posts: 925 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I agree with the conversion companies on this. Brass framed guns are generally the cheapest ones made. If Company X puts a brass frame on a gun that didn't have one back in the day, I have to wonder what other half-* shortcuts they used to save a few Euros.
  • v35v35 Member Posts: 13,200
    edited November -1
    Actually the CSA did use some brass framed revolvers.
    Brass is a lot easier to cast and finish than iron and steel.
    Some brass and bronze alloys are strong and some are very weak.
    I don't expect a brass frame to blow up but it will stretch with lighter loads than an original steel or iron frame.
    If you use very light loads, it might just hold up
  • odenthevikingodentheviking Member Posts: 523 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by v35
    Actually the CSA did use some brass framed revolvers.
    Brass is a lot easier to cast and finish than iron and steel.
    Some brass and bronze alloys are strong and some are very weak.
    I don't expect a brass frame to blow up but it will stretch with lighter loads than an original steel or iron frame.
    If you use very light loads, it might just hold up


    Thank you V35, A good friend of mine,(that builds alot of custom CW repro weapons),described it the same way! It is not that they will blow up or anything like that. Its the "stretching" of the frame even with light loads that could affect the weapons function.
    Thanks for all the input Gentlemen.
Sign In or Register to comment.