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what's your favorite pistol?

swopjanswopjan Member Posts: 3,292
I've got quite a few black powder revolvers, started collecting them but I'm stationed in japan, so unfortunately i haven't picked a favorite yet. What are yours?

I'm sure somebody here will put me to shame and post pics of their collection (by all means!), but I've got 1851's, an 1860, an 1858, 1849 pocket model, 1863 Remington pocket model, 1862 police models, and a baby dragoon and a pair of spiller & burr .36's on the way. On my wish list are the Dragoons, Walker, DA Starr and maybe an 1861 if the price is right. There's also a gorgeous S&W Model 1 on the auction side that breaks my heart at $600, somebody please buy it before temptation gets the best of me. I would want to shoot it so bad [:(]

Comments

  • ken44-40ken44-40 Member Posts: 201 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    my all time favorites are '61 Navies
    61Navies001.jpg

    But, I like '51 Navies as well
    FIEPair1.jpg
  • CSI21CSI21 Member Posts: 1,206 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    What is the difference between the 51 and 61? I dont think I had ever heard of a 61, but I am new to the bp pistol game.
  • andrewsw16andrewsw16 Member Posts: 10,729 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I think it is '51 Navy and '61 Army. Very similar when you look at them. The most obvious distinction is the squared off frame around the cylinder and under the barrel on the '51 and the tapered curve on the '61.
  • swopjanswopjan Member Posts: 3,292
    edited November -1
    In general, "navy" is a .36 caliber and "army" is .44 caliber. The 1861 is a .36 caliber version of the 1860 army, so it should probably be referred to as an 1861 navy but i just refer to them by the year. And the 1851 is always referred to as a navy because the originals were all .36's (and had engravings of naval battles on the cylinders) but some replicas are .44's.

    What really makes it confusing is that the army used both calibers.
  • CSI21CSI21 Member Posts: 1,206 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Well that explains that, I had heard of the 51 and the 60, I know that Wild Bill Hickock favored the 51, but dont know what he carried when he was killed.
  • ken44-40ken44-40 Member Posts: 201 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    CSI21. Just compare the photos. Top one is of a half dozen 1861 Navies. Bottom one is a pair of 1851 Navies.

    If you prefer, call them by their original names:

    1851 Navy = Belt Pistol of Navy caliber
    1861 Navy = Improved Belt pistol of Navy caliber
    1860 Army = Improved Holster Pistol of Army Caliber.

    Naval Battle Scene is found on 1851s, 1861s, and 1860s.
  • krazy4kragskrazy4krags Member Posts: 39 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Howdy,
    Just had to throw in my two cents here...

    The 1861 is a .36 caliber built on the 1849 .31 pocket model frame. This frame size is smaller than the 1851 model and requires the same rebated cylinder as seen on the 1860 Army .44

    Best Regards,
    Hutch
  • ken44-40ken44-40 Member Posts: 201 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by krazy4krags
    Howdy,
    Just had to throw in my two cents here...

    The 1861 is a .36 caliber built on the 1849 .31 pocket model frame. This frame size is smaller than the 1851 model and requires the same rebated cylinder as seen on the 1860 Army .44

    Best Regards,
    Hutch


    Unfortunately, you are not correct. The 1861 Navy has the same sized frame and cylinder as the 1851. The only difference between the 1851 and 1861 is the barrel (See the pictures in my original post). The 1862 Pocket Navy is the five shot pistol made on the 1849 frame with a rebated cylinder.
  • v35v35 Member Posts: 13,200
    edited November -1
    The main feature of the '61 Navy is the creeping rammer of the 1860 Army. The barrel is also streamlined in the 1860 Army style.
    The Pocket Police and Pocket Navy use the 31 cal frame, rebated to accept a 5 shot 36 cal cylinder.
  • Old hickoryOld hickory Member Posts: 1,368 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Pair of 1851 Navy (LePietta) love to shoot them but only do it once or twice a year. Fire both until they won't turn, then it's an hour of fairly pleasurable work to clean and oil them down.
  • 44caliberkid44caliberkid Member Posts: 925 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I love 1860 Armys. I have many different C&B pistols, but so many 1860's I can't tell how many I have. I have special or commemorative issues from Italian manufacturers and two Belgian centaurs. I watch Gunbroker and other sites for variations that I might not have. I also have cartridge conversion models too. I just think it's the best looking pistol I've ever seen.
  • MIKE WISKEYMIKE WISKEY Member, Moderator Posts: 9,668 ******
    edited November -1
    just picked this up, working on loads
    cb.jpg
  • GatofeoGatofeo Member Posts: 230 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Love my Colt 2nd generation 1851 Navy. I've put well over 2,000 rounds through it since buying it new in 1982. The bluing is long gone, and it's acquired a nice, silvery patina. It looks like an old gun, and I like that.
    I recently picked up an Uberti-made 1861 Colt marketed by Cimmaron. It is my understanding that Cimmaron picks the best that Uberti produces, gives them a little extra care and touchup, and resells. This 1861 is tight, beautifully fit and finished and appears to be very accurate. I'm still working with it.
    At $300 from Buffalo Arms, I'd call this 1861 a bargain. Yes, I can get a cheaper 1861 but almost certainly not as well fit and finished.
  • ken44-40ken44-40 Member Posts: 201 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Gatofeo
    Love my Colt 2nd generation 1851 Navy. I've put well over 2,000 rounds through it since buying it new in 1982. The bluing is long gone, and it's acquired a nice, silvery patina. It looks like an old gun, and I like that.
    I recently picked up an Uberti-made 1861 Colt marketed by Cimmaron. It is my understanding that Cimmaron picks the best that Uberti produces, gives them a little extra care and touchup, and resells. This 1861 is tight, beautifully fit and finished and appears to be very accurate. I'm still working with it.
    At $300 from Buffalo Arms, I'd call this 1861 a bargain. Yes, I can get a cheaper 1861 but almost certainly not as well fit and finished.

    Gatofeo, once you start shooting the 1861, I'm fairly certain it'll become your favorite. I shot a few thousand rounds through my 2nd Gen '51s in CAS matches for a few years before I got my '61' Been shooting them almost exclusively for 4 years (and couple thousand rounds each)now and love them.
  • anderskandersk Member Posts: 3,825
    edited November -1
    I just bought a Kentucky Pistol. My first flintlock pistol ... kinda fun.
  • pwilliepwillie Member Posts: 20,254 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I like the Ruger Old Army's....Well made guns..dcp_0005rugeroldarmy.jpg
  • pwilliepwillie Member Posts: 20,254 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Colts are very specialdcp_0003.jpg
  • machine gun moranmachine gun moran Member Posts: 5,198
    edited November -1
    London Navy. 1849. 1861 Navy. 1860 Army. Paterson. I think.

    You HAD to ask[:D].
  • 62fuelie62fuelie Member Posts: 1,067 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have an 1860 Colt (3rd Gen) and an 1858 Remington Repro. I like the look of the Colt far better than the 1858 and it just feels better in the hand. I like the sense of extra steel with the top-strap frame of the 1858. I use the same load in both, so if I had to choose I would keep the Colt.
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