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Handling smokeless powder

hallen2hallen2 Member Posts: 4 ✭✭
Are there any unique problems or areas of concern in handling 8 lb. containers of 4064 rather than 1 lb. containers? I have several empty 1 lb. containers from the same powder and an considering transferring some of the powder to them. Is there a problem with static when doing that? Thanks, hallen

Comments

  • dcs shootersdcs shooters Member Posts: 10,969
    edited November -1
    Leave it in the original container [;)]
    I have been working on a 8# keg of PB for quite a few years and just put enough in the hopper that I will be using at that loading session [^]
  • Hawk CarseHawk Carse Member Posts: 4,318 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    On the other hand, I have been transferring powder from 8-10 lb containers to CORRECT one pound cans for some years. It is easier to fill powder measures and convenient to leave beside the measure and press so I know what I am working with.

    I use a polyethylene funnel which does not have static cling but if you worry about static, get a metal funnel. Old powder cans are metal, new are carbon filled polyethylene and are static free.
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,348 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    8# cans aren't too bad to handle. 16 or 20 pound ones are a pain. you can rub stuff with a dryer sheet to help with static cling. Good plan to ground yourself and the cans first. They say black powder doesn't ignite with static discharge but I disagree.

    I have reused cans and they were re-labeled. As a kid I bought powder in paper lunch bags from 100# kegs.

    Keeping powder in the proper can is important, but less so than primers in proper packaging.
  • XXCrossXXCross Member Posts: 1,374 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Dealing with "static" is why powder is coated with graphite.
    that promotes smooth flow of the powder as well as eliminating
    that much feared static spark.
  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    WELL I know some have someone watching over them We had a reloading supplier going out of business afer the owner died I bought 6 one hundred pound cardboard drums of 4831 went to Paint store and purchassed 60 one gallon cans and tops Transported the drums in my car over 120 miles I smoked at the time but not on this trip. Poured the powder into the Gallon paint cans and never gave it a thought. sold each can with 10 pounds for $15.00 That's right
    $1.50 a pound but I only paid $55.00 a hundred pound drum and new empty can was 38 cents . Yes I am that old
  • XXCrossXXCross Member Posts: 1,374 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Damn Perry, $1.50 per pound ? Kesselring's gun shop used to sell
    that surplus powder for $.75 a pound....but you had to bring your
    own paper bag. (I must be even older!)
  • molarmakermolarmaker Member Posts: 80 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Static sparks, just starting this hand loading, is there any thing else I might want to pay attention to besides the obvious open flame etc.Going back and reread safety issues
  • XXCrossXXCross Member Posts: 1,374 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    A clean uncluttered bench will go a long way in avoiding
    problems. You don't need any distractions while loading
    ammo...things like a TV for instance. Develop a "routine'
    and stick to it.
  • machine gun moranmachine gun moran Member Posts: 5,198
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by charliemeyer007
    8# cans aren't too bad to handle. 16 or 20 pound ones are a pain. you can rub stuff with a dryer sheet to help with static cling. Good plan to ground yourself and the cans first. They say black powder doesn't ignite with static discharge but I disagree.

    I have reused cans and they were re-labeled. As a kid I bought powder in paper lunch bags from 100# kegs.

    Keeping powder in the proper can is important, but less so than primers in proper packaging.


    Back in the 1930's, there was a famous singer who was examining an antique muzzle-loading pistol at a private residence. The gun was still loaded, which no one was aware of. The guy turned on a lamp while holding the pistol, and it fired spontaneously, killing him.
  • AmbroseAmbrose Member Posts: 2,952 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I know I'm taking my life in my hands but the old flat metal IMR powder cans set very neatly and compactly on my shelves and the newer plastic jugs that IMR powders come in--not so much. So I've saved the old cans and when I run out of, say, IMR4831, I take the new jug, put a funnel in the old orange metal can, and pour the new powder in it, and write the date I bought the new powder on the can. It works for me.
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