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Want Info Collectable Replica Revolvers

bprevolverbprevolver Member Posts: 153 ✭✭✭
I am looking for U.S. Historical Society, America Remembers, American Historical foundation, and other commemoratives. I also buy replica revolvers marked "Iver Johnson", "Benson", "SWML", "DART", "FARA", "Pedersoli", "Great Western", "American Heritage", "Hy Score", "Liberty Arms", "Mars", "Markwell", "Potomac", "Rigarmi or RAG", "U.S. Patent Firearms or U.S. Firearms", or any other unusual markings.

Need guns and/or information for forthcoming book, "Replica Percussion Revolvers-A Collectors Guide".

Comments

  • Spider7115Spider7115 Member, Moderator Posts: 29,604 ******
    edited November -1
    Unless you invest in Colt "Second Generation" models, I don't know of ANY replicas that will either hold or go up in value.
  • AntiqueWeapons.orgAntiqueWeapons.org Member Posts: 17 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Originals are for collecting, replicas are for shooting. :)
  • bprevolverbprevolver Member Posts: 153 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I put together the largest collection of Model 1911-1911A1 pistols (over 125)in the U.S in the 1960's. I heard the same "expert" opinions then as I am hearing about the replicas. I use to display the 1911-1911A1's at gun shows when I started (had around 20 guns then). Experts would laugh and tell me I was wasting my money, that I was not very knowledgeable(actually that I was stupid), and that those guns would never be worth anything. I had less than $10,000 invested in that collection of 125 guns in 1968. That collection today would appraise at over $600,000. Not bad for someone who was wasting their money and stupid. Did the same thing with the same response from the "collector experts" over a collection of "Assault Rifles" in the 1980's. Caught as much flack from "gun experts" who thought they were not a legitimate collectable firearm as I did from the anti-gun crazies. I retired from selling that collection of 145 rifles at age 56 when old Bill Clinton came into office.

    I started collecting these replicas 12yrs ago, and formed the Replica Percussion Revolver Collector's Association on the Internet to see if there was collectable interest. The RPRCA, Inc. is now an international association with over 1000 members, one third being from Europe, Canada, S. America, Middle East, and the Orient. I have already seen first hand the appreciation of these guns. One example being the Witloe Remington 1858 New Model Army. This gun sold in 1858 for $125. I have found only one that came up for sell at a Kristy Auction in New York. It sold for $1500. This is far greater than any Colt 2nd or 3rd Generation revolver has ever brought.

    RPRCA research has already identified 78 historically correct replica revolvers that have been produced, 61 non-historic variations(collectable in themselves), along with 10 American manufacturers, 15 Foreign manufacturers, and over 41 Importer and Distributors who marked their guns. Replicas are far more than a Pietta bought at Cabela's(even though a revolver marked Cabela's is now worth a premium to a collector). Something to think about.
  • glabrayglabray Member Posts: 679 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    For a given sum you want to invest, it comes down to a question of quality vs quantity. If you want to have a lot of guns in your collection, (and if you want them all to be shiny new) go the replica route. However, be aware it could be a very, very, long time before you would be able to sell them or more than you paid for them. And be aware you will need to keep all the original paperwork and packaging and if there is the slightest mark on the metal or wood the value can be reduced by half. As an investment (ie, you expect the value to increase) there is no substitute for originals in the best condition you can afford.
  • Spider7115Spider7115 Member, Moderator Posts: 29,604 ******
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by glabray
    For a given sum you want to invest, it comes down to a question of quality vs quantity. If you want to have a lot of guns in your collection, (and if you want them all to be shiny new) go the replica route. However, be aware it could be a very, very, long time before you would be able to sell them or more than you paid for them. And be aware you will need to keep all the original paperwork and packaging and if there is the slightest mark on the metal or wood the value can be reduced by half. As an investment (ie, you expect the value to increase) there is no substitute for originals in the best condition you can afford.

    ...very, VERY!
  • FrancFFrancF Member, Moderator Posts: 35,278 ******
    edited November -1
    BTW Thanks Allen-
    Sorry guys My hands are tied over here[V] I will shoot admin an E-mail

    Sent-It will go away soon.[:)]
  • 44caliberkid44caliberkid Member Posts: 925 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    bprevolver didn't say he was collecting these for investment or increase in value.
    I collect them just because I like them. Some I keep NIB and some I shoot. I'm trying to collect all the different models and some variants. I like the fact I can get them pretty cheap in a lot of cases.
    As for "only the Colt's increase in value" may I bring to your attention the 1860 Army replicas that were made in Belgium in the 1960's. In the box, these sell on gunbroker for $450 - $500, an increase of 400 - 500% of their original selling price. 2d generation Colts are only bringing about 150 - 200% of their original selling price. At gunshows, just before closing on Sunday afternoons, I have bought 2d gen. Colt BP, at close to the original retail price on two occasions.
    I will concede it is a narrow, niche, market, but it is there. Nobody thinks they're going to get rich collecting replica revolvers. However, I've taken some to live auctions that have a reputation for generating high prices for firearms and seen them bring 50% over retail for NIB pieces.
  • 44caliberkid44caliberkid Member Posts: 925 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
  • 44caliberkid44caliberkid Member Posts: 925 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    To Beffa, nice 1862 Colt pocket Navy there. You could probably get a little more than $235 for it, say, in the $300+ range. The nickle silver plate on the grip frame adds some and the 6.5 barrel is a plus. A new one is $315 and that's with a brass backstrap/ trigger guard and shorter barrel. If you keep this NIB and they don't make this configuration again, you should be able to recoup your money with interest, anytime.
  • dandak1dandak1 Member Posts: 450 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
  • madcratebuildermadcratebuilder Member Posts: 9 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I see many replicas go up in value. The High Standard Confederate series up 300%. Just about any of the Paterson's if you have held them long enough. Uberti Texas Dragoon, any Dragoon with a shoulder stock (ASM). The Centuare's. All the 2nd and 3rd gens I see are way over priced, a few good deals come along but few and far between. It's a buyers market.
  • slumlord44slumlord44 Member Posts: 3,695 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I bought a CVA .50 Cal Express side by side double rifle many years ago for deer hunting. Still hunt with it every year. They quit making them years ago. Prices have gradualy gone up. Not worth fortune for sure, but worth more than they were new.
  • Frontiersman101Frontiersman101 Member Posts: 3,259
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by AntiqueWeapons.org
    Originals are for collecting, replicas are for shooting. :)


    +1
  • Spider7115Spider7115 Member, Moderator Posts: 29,604 ******
    edited November -1
    Here are a couple of Second Generation Colts. I sold the top one for $2,500 here on Gunbroker.

    EngavedCasedNavy_008a.jpg
  • dandak1dandak1 Member Posts: 450 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    bprevolver, I have a question for you. I have an 1860 2nd gen Colt in stainless steel, but its serial number is not in the range mentioned in the blue book, it is slightly outside it. Are the number mfg listed in the books accurate???
    Also own a 2nd gen Butterfield Colt 1860 and a Crazy horse 3rd gen dragoon, but I never see these sold so i have no idea what prices they realize.
  • 44caliberkid44caliberkid Member Posts: 925 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Spider, what did that engraved one sell for new? MSRP?
  • Spider7115Spider7115 Member, Moderator Posts: 29,604 ******
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by 44caliberkid
    Spider, what did that engraved one sell for new? MSRP?


    It was actually a Colt factory "showpiece" at the 1978 Las Vegas gun show. I bought it from a dealer in Ohio last year. According to Dennis Russell's book "Colt percussion revolvers - The Second Generation", the original MSRP was $200.

    Engraved_Colt_009a.jpg
    Engraved_Colt_010a.jpg
  • 44caliberkid44caliberkid Member Posts: 925 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    $200 would be for a stock 1851 navy. A fully engraved model with the gold decorations would be considerably more.
  • Spider7115Spider7115 Member, Moderator Posts: 29,604 ******
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by 44caliberkid
    $200 would be for a stock 1851 navy. A fully engraved model with the gold decorations would be considerably more.


    You are correct and that was my typo. The stock Navy was $200 and the engraved Model C1122 shown above was $1,350.
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