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any window guys??

trc313trc313 Member Posts: 3,475
edited October 2006 in General Discussion
I am looking to replace my windows in my home. How would you go about measuring the old ones to know what size I will need?

Comments

  • dcon12dcon12 Member Posts: 30,804 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I normally use a tape measure although I have been known to use a string. Don
  • trc313trc313 Member Posts: 3,475
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by dcon12
    I normally use a tape measure although I have been known to use a string. Don

    You think 100 yards would be enough?
    Thats all the string I have
  • dclocodcloco Member Posts: 2,967
    edited November -1
    Depends on whether you you want to keep the existing frame and interior/exterior trim.
  • trc313trc313 Member Posts: 3,475
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by dcloco
    Depends on whether you you want to keep the existing frame and interior/exterior trim.

    Maybe the exterior trim if capable, interior if able, not the frame. I was looking at replacement windows with the frames. I was just trying to figure out how to measure without tearing off the trim.
  • dongizmodongizmo Member Posts: 14,477 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I used the insert type replacements, they go inside your existing jamb, they are pretty easy to do, hit a HD or Lowes and they will show you how to install them.
    Don
    The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly, is to fill the world with fools.
  • Warpig883Warpig883 Member Posts: 6,459
    edited November -1
    Pull off the trim and measure the size of the rough opening.
    or
    Go to the store and pick out the window you want. Go home and cut the rough opening.
    or
    Hire a trained professional.
  • FrancFFrancF Member, Moderator Posts: 35,278 ******
    edited November -1
    AND DON"T MAKE THEM TIGHT!!!!![:D] allow at least 3/16" for expansion/contraction.

    If I recall 1/8" bottom and sides. 1/4" at the top.
  • trc313trc313 Member Posts: 3,475
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by dongizmo
    I used the insert type replacements, they go inside your existing jamb, they are pretty easy to do, hit a HD or Lowes and they will show you how to install them.
    Don

    What if the jamb is the problem?
  • Warpig883Warpig883 Member Posts: 6,459
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by trc313
    quote:Originally posted by dongizmo
    I used the insert type replacements, they go inside your existing jamb, they are pretty easy to do, hit a HD or Lowes and they will show you how to install them.
    Don

    What if the jamb is the problem?


    Tear it out and put in a new one. This is also a great opportunity to make your window bigger.
  • GuvamintCheeseGuvamintCheese Member Posts: 38,932
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by trc313
    any window guys??

    I like windows OK, but Im more of an * man.
    image009.jpg
  • dongizmodongizmo Member Posts: 14,477 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by trc313
    quote:Originally posted by dongizmo
    I used the insert type replacements, they go inside your existing jamb, they are pretty easy to do, hit a HD or Lowes and they will show you how to install them.
    Don

    What if the jamb is the problem?

    I know for wood jamb windows, which I have some experience with,
    It depends on what is wrong with it, when you put the insert in, it covers the old jamb, so as long as you have someting for the screws to bite into (on top & bottom of jambs) you should be ok, even if you don't get all the screw points to bite, the insert is held in by the windstrip on the outside and stop molding on the inside, so combined with a good bead of caulk when you set it, it should stay put.
    Don
    The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly, is to fill the world with fools.
  • He DogHe Dog Member Posts: 48,548 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    And get energy effecient windows while you are at it, and cut your heating costs. A little more spent now will pay in the long rung. (an energy effecient * is not a bad idea either if you are an * man like Cartod)
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