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floorplate help

toad67toad67 Member Posts: 11,791 ✭✭✭✭
edited September 2016 in Ask the Experts
I have an early Wby Euromark Mark V in 300wby with a hinged floor plate. The bottom metal is cast aluminum. When I press the button inside the trigger guard the floor plate won't release, even with ammo in it. There is some what looks to be corrosion, or old oil. Some of the corrosion is white, and some is brown right around the release pin/trigger guard. I've let it sit with some CLP, but nothing yet. I think corrosion is the culprit, but not sure since I've put enough pressure on the release button that it should've opened if it was going to. Since the plate covers up the last screw, taking it out of the stock is not an option. Thoughts?

Comments

  • TANK78ZTANK78Z Member Posts: 1,279 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I would use some Kroil and let it sit 48 hours,A CLP product probably won't do the job.
    A few light taps in the "corroded"latching area with a non marring hammer might help to loosen up the grip of the corrosion and give the CLP or Kroil a little help.
  • toad67toad67 Member Posts: 11,791 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Am I correct in my assumption that when the latch in the trigger guard is pushed, it then pushes rearward on the pin between the trigger guard and plate, then the spring pressure on the follower will pop the plate down? The release lever moves fine, but it doesn't appear that the pin is moving rearward. Where does it come in contact with the pin?
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,649 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    When aluminum and steel parts are together. The aluminum will start to deteriorate. If it isn't isolated from the steel, with a protective coating of some kind.

    The "white corrosion" is the indicator. It is actually the aluminum surface in direct contact with the steel. Being chemically broken down.

    If you can't separate the aluminum and steel parts, to remove all the "white corrosion". So that it won't continue. Your going to have to get another aluminum floor plate.

    Something has to be done to isolate the aluminum and steel parts. To prevent the chemical reaction, causing the aluminum surface to break down.
  • toad67toad67 Member Posts: 11,791 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by rufe-snow
    When aluminum and steel parts are together. The aluminum will start to deteriorate. If it isn't isolated from the steel, with a protective coating of some kind.

    The "white corrosion" is the indicator. It is actually the aluminum surface in direct contact with the steel. Being chemically broken down.

    If you can't separate the aluminum and steel parts, to remove all the "white corrosion". So that it won't continue. Your going to have to get another aluminum floor plate.

    Something has to be done to isolate the aluminum and steel parts. To prevent the chemical reaction, causing the aluminum surface to break down.


    The bottom metal is all one piece aluminum. The only steel parts appear to be the pins, follower and spring and maybe the floorplate pin.
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,346 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I don't remember what the locking mechanism looks like. +1 Kroil. Tapping it with a rubber mallet while holding the release in the open position. If there is room maybe you could work in a "slim jim" to try and free the latch by pushing or pulling. Can you punch out the pivot pin for the latch release.
  • toad67toad67 Member Posts: 11,791 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    So I got it open, appears that it wasn't corroded after all. There is a small pin that goes thru the trigger guard about a third of the way down allowing the release lever to hinge. There is a spring in the front of the trigger guard that is in an approximate 45 degree angle that puts pressure on the lever to keep it closed. On the top end of the release lever there is a small lip that catches on the floorplate catch pin. It appears that either the lip on the release lever, or the floorplate catch pin need a little adjustment (filling). I could get it to open when the assy was out of the gun, but won't open in the stock. This is a fairly special gun so I don't want to mess it up.

    Edit: A few strokes of the file on the floorplate catch pin allows it to release, but you need to put quite a bit of finger pressure to make it happen though. It is an older Wby Euromark that was owned by Craig Boddington with provenance, and pics of him and the first leopard that he ever killed was with this gun. Thanks Fellas!

    Todd
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,649 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by toad67
    quote:Originally posted by rufe-snow
    When aluminum and steel parts are together. The aluminum will start to deteriorate. If it isn't isolated from the steel, with a protective coating of some kind.

    The "white corrosion" is the indicator. It is actually the aluminum surface in direct contact with the steel. Being chemically broken down.

    If you can't separate the aluminum and steel parts, to remove all the "white corrosion". So that it won't continue. Your going to have to get another aluminum floor plate.

    Something has to be done to isolate the aluminum and steel parts. To prevent the chemical reaction, causing the aluminum surface to break down.


    The bottom metal is all one piece aluminum. The only steel parts appear to be the pins, follower and spring and maybe the floorplate pin.



    If the floorplate hinges on a steel axis pin? This is where the "white corrosion", would affect the operation of the floorplate. If the floorplate, hasn't been hard anodized i.e. when assembled, the anodized coating has been removed.
  • toad67toad67 Member Posts: 11,791 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by rufe-snow
    quote:Originally posted by toad67
    quote:Originally posted by rufe-snow
    When aluminum and steel parts are together. The aluminum will start to deteriorate. If it isn't isolated from the steel, with a protective coating of some kind.

    The "white corrosion" is the indicator. It is actually the aluminum surface in direct contact with the steel. Being chemically broken down.

    If you can't separate the aluminum and steel parts, to remove all the "white corrosion". So that it won't continue. Your going to have to get another aluminum floor plate.

    Something has to be done to isolate the aluminum and steel parts. To prevent the chemical reaction, causing the aluminum surface to break down.


    That's where I was originally going with it. However, I could put enough pressure on the release latch so that the portion inside the trigger guard was flush and it still wouldn't release the f/p. The lever just would not travel far enough to let it release. I just took a few strokes to shorten the catch pin and viola! Another thing that I learned is that when I looked in my exploded gun drawings book this type of action was considered an American version of the mark v action, rather than the standard (European?) version that is listed on the numerich site.

    The bottom metal is all one piece aluminum. The only steel parts appear to be the pins, follower and spring and maybe the floorplate pin.



    If the floorplate hinges on a steel axis pin? This is where the "white corrosion", would affect the operation of the floorplate. If the floorplate, hasn't been hard anodized i.e. when assembled, the anodized coating has been removed.
  • asphalt cowboyasphalt cowboy Member Posts: 8,854 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    You say it functions when removed from the rifle?
    How does it function if you loosen the rear guard screw 1/8-1/4-1/2 turn?
    If this alleviates the binding it's possible the wood has suffered crush from over tightening the guard screw/s.
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