In order to participate in the GunBroker Member forums, you must be logged in with your GunBroker.com account. Click the sign-in button at the top right of the forums page to get connected.
Options

FAKES & WANNABEES

124

Comments

  • Options
    Rocky RaabRocky Raab Member Posts: 14,266 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Amen, Smitty.

    I always laugh when it turns out that every single barstool is occupied by a former SEAL or Ranger, or CIA guy. If there were that many of them in 'Nam, they would have been packed in like fish in a can.

    I'm never sure how to take their claims. I can either be insulted because I actually was what they claim, or I can feel proud that what I did seems worthy enough for it to be lied about.

    O-2 pilot, USAF, Ban Me Thuot (CCS MACVSOG) '71.
    I may be a bit crazy - but I didn't drive myself.
  • Options
    macvsoggmacvsogg Member Posts: 3 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I would like to thank all past and present Special Operations Men and Women who have kept, and keep the SF Traditions and Faith Alive.
    "Thanks to all who have Served and continue to serve" "Godbless"


    ("You've Never Lived Till You've Almost Died.
    For Those Who Fight For It'
    Life Has A Flavor
    The Protected Will Never Know")

    Smitty out"
  • Options
    Rocky RaabRocky Raab Member Posts: 14,266 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Amen again, my brother.

    Call me a DND -- Damn Near Died -- many times over. Every day I wake up is a bleeding miracle...
    I may be a bit crazy - but I didn't drive myself.
  • Options
    EnariEnari Member Posts: 1 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hi All,

    First, I was a Spec 4 combat medic ((91b20) trained at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio. I in Vietnam from December, 1967-July, 1969. ( I extended so I could get a drop.) I was with the 9th Infantry based at Camp Bearcat, Bien Hoa, but spent most of my time with the 4th Infantry based at Cam Enari, Pleiku and was involved in operations in Dak To, Hill 1338, Ben Het and other locales. After discharge I moved to Australia.

    Now get this, there are American wannabees in Australia. I met a guy at work who claimed ot be part of a secret Air Force unit that fought behind enemy lines on secret missions. When I asked simple questions like where he was based or even minor things about c-rations he had no idea. He was mot aware that a P38 was no a plane but a can opener! On one level I pity him. On another level good men died and he seeks to bask in their glory.

    Finally, there is a plague of phoney Australian Vietnam vets who are full of war stories and bs.

    Gentlemen, here is my war story. I survived.
  • Options
    steamingutpilesteamingutpile Member Posts: 65 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Funny how many idiots claim they were in country. Usually claim special forces, SEALS, and etc and then start puffing about all the combat and clandestin missions they were on. When a guy starts that that's when I come from Missouri.
    Me I was what the company commander of our boot company called a draft dodger. And he was right I was a draft dodger. I had no chance in hell of not being drafted after high school. Don't remember which was which but between my BD and first initial of last name I was 2&4 in the lottery so I joined the Navy to keep my dumb * out of Nam. And this is how it went. 11weeks basic 3 week basic propulsion engineering school 7 weeks Engineman A school. Thirty days leave off to San Diego for Vietnamese Orientation School Then off to Saigon Mac V assigned LSB Nha Be Naval Support Group Nov 71 to Sept 72. They didn't need any dumd kid E3 enginemen so they stuck me in base security where I stood gate watches and walked perimeter patrols. Closest I got to gettin shot was when I didn't pay a whore; hell she was a skag addict and fell asleep in the middle of it. Boy was that Mamma San pissed. Then off to an old rust bucket in Charleston SC AS 18 Orion subtender. Because of my drinking and and a couple of other incidents the Navy and I came to an agreement. They didn't want me and I didn't want them. Signed off on a General under Honorable and never looked back. In all of 28 months never saw a diesel engine after A school.
  • Options
    River RatRiver Rat Member Posts: 9,022
    edited November -1
    Gut Pile, I was a draft dodger too! With a draft number of 12, I figured what the heck, dropped out of college, and joined the Navy.

    I heard a recent comment from my stepson the other day, that fit right into this topic. He said he met a guy who claimed he was an ex-marine (that term always raises a flag), and was a medic in the Marines. I was about to say "I always hear there's no such thing as an 'ex-marine,' and the Marines don't have medics -- they have U.S. Navy corpsmen." But it just wasn't worth the trouble.
  • Options
    1stTankerSki1stTankerSki Member Posts: 16 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I was in Nam, '65-'66, one year was enough for me. I never spoke about it much with my first two wives. But sometime around the mid 80's my third wife and I went to the county fair in Prescott, AZ. and with her I related my Viet Nam experieances more so with her.
    Anyway we were walking through the fair grounds booths, and she went over to a vender, and brought back a "Vietnam Veteran" cap and handed it to me, but I did not want to wear it ( at the time)
    anyway we walked over to the CAP booth, and she tells the guy, "He won't wear it!", and then he asked me, When were you in Nam? And I replied '65-'66! Oh he says, and he is wearing a Purple Heart Cap, he went on to ask, Were you wounded too?
    Why don't you buy one of these! like the one he had on.

    With that I pulled up my Tee Shirt, and turned toward him, to reveal my ugly brownish scar, and said to him, Here's mine, show me your's! And I get a blank stare from him, and he replied he was not wounded. I then asked, Then why are you wearing a PH cap? With that he took it off, and handed it to me, and said this is your's !
    I'm now single after my fourth wife, but I still wear both caps, twenty years latter on occasion.

    Other times, I just ask, What was your Service Number? and the wannbes can't remember or reply fast enough, and i just smile!

    Semper Fi !
    Ski
  • Options
    Overly HackledOverly Hackled Member Posts: 9 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I ran into a guy back in an old Vet Center rap group who doctored up his DD214 to list one of his awards as the Navy Cross. One small problem........... .He was in the ARMY!. This was a real deal all combat vet rap group . We let him live and to this day I doubt he knows how lucky he was. He was pissing on the graves of our brothers and lived to lie another day.

    It's my understanding that the Navy has only awarded one Navy Cross to some one in the Army. I hear it was an Army medic serving with a Marine unit in WWI.Don't know if that is true or not. But I know that SOB Want a be trying to crash into that rap group never received the Navy Cross.
  • Options
    tmj00099tmj00099 Member Posts: 15 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    yes, a lady friend of mine asked me if I was in the service,I said navy, the next ? was don't tell me you were a seal. Laughed my * off. I told her most people say they are seals but couldn't even pass buds training. I know I didn't. Might be military.com or something similar that actively seeks to find and post users whom came to be seals. There is a Big Wall for them
    ex Navy 72-74 76-78
    Great lakes
    USS Barney (VN 67-68)
  • Options
    jafpijafpi Member Posts: 1 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    RE: The Navy Cross in RVN (to Army Personnel)

    Kenneth Ledford, Jr., First Lieutenant, U.S. Army, on 15 September 1970 with the 58th Medical Battalion, 68th Medical Group, United States Army, RVN. He was a Rescue Helicopter Pilot who put his life at risk to rescue wounded troops. The nuts and bolts are that he was run off by heavy fire and came back with 4 Navy Gunships and managed to effect the rescue. You can check the details on-line by googling Army Soldier+Navy Cross in Vietnam.

    Yes, there are a lot of wannabees out there. 1 out of 25 Nam Vets were in combat. The rest of the 24 were support troops. I was a support troop. As a private investigator I have seen the fake 214's with the Medal of Honor or the Navy Cross as awards. Thanks to the copier, they make realistic looking copies after they add all their "accomplishments." It makes me sick. But once they falsify the 214 and use it for employment purposes, etc, they have violated the federal law and it needs to be turned over to the Fee BI's. And maybe they will investigate it and the govt will prosecute them - if it's an election year.

    Anyone out there reading this who was with Co A/lst Bn/197 Inf Bde at Ft Benning? It was renamed ??? and reassigned to lst Cav and left Benning in '65.
  • Options
    Jim RauJim Rau Member Posts: 3,550
    edited November -1
    196th,197th, 198th, 199th, LIB's were sent to RVN. As you stated the 197th went with the 1st CAV. The 196th and 198th were originaly stand alone but were eventuly assighed to the Americal Div (23rd Inf Div). The 199th LIB was the only one that did not get assigned to a larger unit (Div). My first tour I was with the 199th.
  • Options
    IronrifleIronrifle Member Posts: 664
    edited November -1
    Jim, I was also with the 199th. 10-67 to 2-69, Alpha Btry 2/40 Arty..
  • Options
    joker19joker19 Member Posts: 110 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    There is a way to find them out!!!! Works well ONLY if you are not one of them. Ask them a time/location specific question and you will have no doubt. Problem with sites like this is 95% are liars! It is why I stay away from them.......got sucked up into this one when I bought a gun here..........MOST are absolute garbage...like the one that said he was a sniper and carried a 12 guage????????? Vietnam was over 40 years ago and those that were there are old enough to not lie about it! Russell Cowley CW4 US ARMY Retired
    2nd AHC guns 48th ahc GUNS
  • Options
    swampratswamprat Member Posts: 12 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I"m very glad to get a chance to post to a subject that has almost put me in jail a few times,both times saved by officers who were vets.I take great offence to fakes,which are easy to spot.I lost 3/4 of my pltoon on 6/3/68,panel68and69 of the wall.Are there any laws agenst this form of B.S.(short of as-kicking)?I take my brother(non-service) to gun shows,I flip him out when I reach across a table to Welcome a Brother Home,many times I know the Branch of service,and about when thay were there,as they know I was 11B10,anybody else have this happen to them? Out of Respect I just have to get in some fake BSers face,PS my brother also knows enough to bust their *,and threten them with meeting me.If your reading this take a minite to Thank those who made this trip possable as I do everyday.WELCOME HOME,Michael
  • Options
    mogley98mogley98 Member Posts: 18,297 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Hot Tuna
    When my son took history in high school the teacher asked if anyone in the room had a parent who served in VN. He was the only one who raise his hand. I'l bet there were a few kids whose parents did serve in VN and they didn't know it. Combat vets usually don't like to talk about it, even with each other.
    +1
    Why don't we go to school and work on the weekends and take the week off!
  • Options
    GREASYGREASY Member Posts: 19 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Ive read most of these threads and I just shake my head at some of the stories, Im sure there true as over the years Ive heared several myself but there is one that stands out. Im at AMERICAN LAKE VA HOSIPTAL, in TACOMA, WA.and this guy comes over and sits next to me and introduces himself and starts talking about his time in the "NAM".Well he claimed he was a "WAIT FOR IT" truck driver and drove truck on the HO CHI MINH TRAIL,I asked him which unit and he couldnt remember so I asked him which army he servied in?I was thinking I should be shooting this guy. For all I know he was there to con the VA into some claim, where in the HE.... do these guys come from, it seems like were flooded with them. Just had a thought these guys were in that great battle not some puny fire fight, you guys the battle of puntang, near the crouch rot river just N.E. of NUI BA DINH right near the hobo woods or was it the iron triangle,he was for sure AGENT ORANGE FROM THE CIA. aka EDDIE MURPHY.[V]
  • Options
    seawolfgunnerseawolfgunner Member Posts: 2 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Paleobrute
    quote:Originally posted by 11b6r
    Ironrifle- nope. Ranger (11B6R MOS) Got a bunch of friends that are, have spent time handing out at JFK Center, but not SF. Now, my GRANDSON....[:p]


    11B6R?

    Skill level 5 is the highest enlisted skill level and applies to both E-8 (MSG/1SG) and E-9 (SGM/CSM). There is no skill level 6.

    As for "R"...RANGER designation is "V". So an E-8 or E-9 Infantryman at a Ranger Battalion would have an MOS of 11B5V. If another MOS he'd be whatever that MOS was as far as three character alpha-numeric MOS identifier plus the numerical skill level identifier plus the RANGER identifier of "V". For example a SSG Supply NCO who was RANGER qualified would be 92Y3V: 92Y- Supply Specialist/3- E6-Staff Sergeant/V -RANGER Qualified.

    Which battalion were assigned to when you retired?
  • Options
    seawolfgunnerseawolfgunner Member Posts: 2 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Screwed that up before. Regarding post in Sept. of Army pilot being awarded the Navy Cross. So so true and so well deserved. I was there. I am alive today because of him. He had ice in his veins. I was with the Navy Seawolves. We were air support for river rats and SEALs. We got called in because the army would not go cover his efforts to get first downed group out. It was a helicopter trap. They were throwing up 50 cal at us and more. We went down in VC lake after our fire team lead bird went down first. We auto-rotated, they hit hard. He got us out under heavy fire and then said we were going down to get our shipmates. I was sure he had signed our death cert. We pulled out the survivors and with a very heavy load and under heavy fire and mortar attack managed to get out. It was much more complicated than that but Ledford did an amazing job that day. He earned every bit of that Navy Cross on 9-15-70. The events of that day have been written up many times. I found this thread because I still try periodically to find him to thank him. His crew got silver stars. The medic would not leave the bird to go help get our guys. He was so puckered up. The crew chief manned up. He deserved his Silver star. We got Bronze for hitting the paddies to go get our shipmates. Ledford is the real deal.
  • Options
    lkanneslkannes Member Posts: 2,269 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I am not in the Military and never have been. Over the years I have worked with a few Viet Nam Veterans. My Uncle also served in Viet Nam. They are the ones who don't talk about it. The ones who brag about "Being in Nam" are almost always B.S.er's. To those who did serve, Thank You.
  • Options
    kylewkylew Member Posts: 95 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Gentlemen, Thank you for your service. I never served but have worked as a DOD subcontractor for 30+ years. I hope that in some small way I have come to "get it". My older brother Scott is MIA since May 12 68.
  • Options
    HJ LambHJ Lamb Member Posts: 1 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I am not nor was I ever trained to be a combat vet during Vietnam. I was however an enlisted aircrew member on C-123 and C-118 aircraft assigned to Scatback and the 405th Air Base Wing at Clark AB in the Philippines from 1972 to 1974. I flew quite a few missions into Vietnam and Thailand from 1973 thru 1974. Spent some time at Pleiku, Danang and Than Sahn Nhut as well as Saigon. Most of the missions were hauling cargo and troops to transition onto freedom birds or down to Clark or Subic. I was a loadmaster on the C-123s and a Air Cargo/Passenger Tech on the C-118s. No combat experience and was never shot at that I was aware of. But I did work in Operation Homecoming when the POWs were returned to Clark AB. My aircraft, C-118A - Tail # 53-3291 was detailed to TSN as a backup for the C-141s in case they developed any in flight problems. Never happened. We also ran a few missions to Chaing Mai in N. Thailand to pick up POW remains brought there from Cambodia and Laos. About the strangest cargo we ever hauled was a Malaysian Honey Bear from Thailand into Clark for their "zoo" at the Jungle Survival school (AKA "Snake school"). I have run into several folks that claim to be VN Vets who say they had 3 and 4 tours in the bush doing secret missions and that kind of BS. Don't know why people do that kind of thing but it must be to fill a gap they wish they had done or were too scared to do. Retired after spending 23 years in the AF and then went to work with the Post Office for a while. Now am fully retired and doing all the hunting, fishing, camping and RVing these old bones will allow.
  • Options
    1st Air Cav1st Air Cav Member Posts: 4 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I hate posers, period! Any one of scores of them could have had my spot, way back when. I went, served and came home, never even talked to my wife of 35yrs about it. Once, I tried to talk to a friend, after a short story, intended to make myself feel better, he called me a liar, just couldn't be true, I'm a bullcraper, etc. Not a friend anymore. It helps to talk with a comrad in arms, nobody else, just the way it is.
  • Options
    KhanTrollKhanTroll Member Posts: 1 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Gdt928
    I served in the 82d Abn (Bravo 1/505 and CSC 1/508) from 72-76, although I did not go to VN.

    I still run into "combat vets" who went on dangerous, clandestine missions that can't be verified because "the records had been destroyed in the St. Louis fire". Hah!

    Funniest thing I remember was a guy in the 1/508 that had "awarded" himself all types of qualifications -- CIB, Scuba School, Recondo, Pathfinder, you name it, he wore the badge. Trouble was, the CO checked out his records and found them all FAKE. That young Spec 4 spent some time in the stockade for that one.

    One thing I do know about guys who served in combat - they don't yap about it. It is a singular experience.

    Thanks to all you guys that did serve in combat. In VietNam, and everywhere else. I salute you. All The Way,
  • Options
    metalbackmetalback Member Posts: 1 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Marine Corps 72-74. Anyone starts to talking to me about Paris Island I always say I sure am glad there wasn't any sand fleas there. If they say yea....I know instantly they are a down and out liar.....:) I never been bit by so many damn sand fleas in my life as I was while there. Standing at attention with one of them SOB's in my ear biting away was the most misrable thing there was. Anyone one out there in cyberland ever know Gunny Matson? He was chiseled out of a block of marble!!!! Always wondered what happened to him. He was in charge of platoon 1010 in "72". Have a good one guys!!!
  • Options
    krawiechkrawiech Member Posts: 135 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    welcome home 1sttankerski i was in country the same time you must have been stationed near danang there were very few marines in 2 corps i was in pleiku and my service number was us51452907 so you can see i was in the f army anyway welcome home hope you are in good health hank
  • Options
    kimikimi Member Posts: 44,723 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Duce1
    quote:Originally posted by kissgoodnight
    I was 19 when I went in the marines. Most of the guys were 18 years old. I have talked to fakes that would have had to be 14 years old to have been in Viet-Nam. I just let them talk then give the the dates and their age. They just shut up and walk away.


    I went in when I was 17. Yep ! 17. I graduated from high school at 17 in May and did not turn 18 until August or 3 months later. I had my parents sign the papers so I could go in and start basic training a month after I graduated.


    I joined at 17 years old, too, Duce, in 1960. What year did you join up?
    What's next?
  • Options
    Duce1Duce1 Member Posts: 9,329
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by kimi
    quote:Originally posted by Duce1
    quote:Originally posted by kissgoodnight
    I was 19 when I went in the marines. Most of the guys were 18 years old. I have talked to fakes that would have had to be 14 years old to have been in Viet-Nam. I just let them talk then give the the dates and their age. They just shut up and walk away.


    I went in when I was 17. Yep ! 17. I graduated from high school at 17 in May and did not turn 18 until August or 3 months later. I had my parents sign the papers so I could go in and start basic training a month after I graduated.


    I joined at 17 years old, too, Duce, in 1960. What year did you join up?


    I went in 1965. I never went to Vietnam. I served stateside and finally was sent to Korea. To be honest I never volunteered to go to Vietnam either I figured they would send me in due time and they shipped me off to Korea and for the luck if you called it that is where I stayed. I had things going my way looking back. I was a lazy young man and hid and did my best to not be seen. I was a good soldier when it came to never volunteer for anything and blame the other guy.

    It has been many years and dates and times are a little foggy with me. I had chosen to just go on in life and never look back so if my times might be off in some of what I say. Heck for retirement reasons I had to send off for my DD214 and if you ask me where it was today I would have to tear the house down to find it. But one of these days I will take the time to copy all my pictures to digital and maybe post them. Most are black and white but a few are in color.
  • Options
    kimikimi Member Posts: 44,723 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Duce1
    quote:Originally posted by kimi
    quote:Originally posted by Duce1
    quote:Originally posted by kissgoodnight
    I was 19 when I went in the marines. Most of the guys were 18 years old. I have talked to fakes that would have had to be 14 years old to have been in Viet-Nam. I just let them talk then give the the dates and their age. They just shut up and walk away.


    I went in when I was 17. Yep ! 17. I graduated from high school at 17 in May and did not turn 18 until August or 3 months later. I had my parents sign the papers so I could go in and start basic training a month after I graduated.


    I joined at 17 years old, too, Duce, in 1960. What year did you join up?


    I went in 1965. I never went to Vietnam. I served stateside and finally was sent to Korea. To be honest I never volunteered to go to Vietnam either I figured they would send me in due time and they shipped me off to Korea and for the luck if you called it that is where I stayed. I had things going my way looking back. I was a lazy young man and hid and did my best to not be seen. I was a good soldier when it came to never volunteer for anything and blame the other guy.

    It has been many years and dates and times are a little foggy with me. I had chosen to just go on in life and never look back so if my times might be off in some of what I say. Heck for retirement reasons I had to send off for my DD214 and if you ask me where it was today I would have to tear the house down to find it. But one of these days I will take the time to copy all my pictures to digital and maybe post them. Most are black and white but a few are in color.


    No, I would not ask you for your DD214. That's your business, but you did make note in an above post that you went in the Army "after the war" and 1965 would have been at the very start of it. Once again, I "thought" that you had stated that you (and you wife?) were in your late 60's, which would have put you in the Army prior to 1960 had you joined at 17...hence the idea that we might have been "in country" together.

    Have a good day, man.
    What's next?
  • Options
    KansasGuyKansasGuy Member Posts: 13 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Wow - I am amazed how many of us have run into these fakers. So here's my story - about a faker that is.

    Several years ago I was in conversation with a fellow who was a training store manager for our company of discount stores. I did not know him too well, but had to talk with him several times a week as he prepared a new store for opening.

    He seemed to be interesting through the several weeks of store opening prep and one day I asked him about his background. It was not unusual for a training manager to be anything from 25 or so to as much as early 60's.

    He got into his "Vietnam" service.I told him about the Corps and the planes I worked on in Da Nang. He claimed to have been through Da Nang a few times. I explained to him about the F-4's and the older version EF-10B;s we had for ECM.

    So he chimes in with "I really liked the A-10's we had."
    "You mean A-7's or A-8's, or the A1's the ROV had?" I asked

    "No, you know the warthogs. The A10's." he said.

    I was speechless. He then proceeded to tell me about the fact that before he got out he was awarded - are you ready for this - the Congressional Medal of Honor.

    I was beyond speechless and could not wait to get off the phone with him.
    I immediately googled to get the names of people with the CMH. The only person with his last name received it for the Civil War.

    I went and had a chat with the personnel guy who was in charge of training. He and I used to work together.

    I told him what they guy had said and that no one with his name had the medal within the past 100 years. And that the A10 Warthog had been developed long after Vietnam. Specifically Desert Storm era.

    The obvious suggestion was to watch him closely, especially with any cash transactions after the store opened up.

    Several weeks later he crossed himself up in another lie and left the company. Good riddance.

    The "Stolen Valour" act was passed after this. He's lucky. I would have turned him in.
  • Options
    NOTPARSNOTPARS Member Posts: 2,081 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I never served but find some irony in this unbelievable state of affairs. When I was in college (1973-1977), I knew several Viet Nam Veterans who were going through college. Some were USMC guys who had been enlisted and, upon graduation, were going OCS. They were all low profile types, everyone knew they were vets, but they didn't talk about their experiences. I recall the other college kids really gave them the cold shoulder. They listened to me discuss my plans to go to USMC Platoon Leader's Class with patience and forebearance. I had no clue. When I returned from my summer of Junior PLC (1975), I not only got the cold shoulder from students I knew, but received snide comments (all anti-military) from professors I knew. I blew my knee up playing rugby (boy was I dumb) and could not return to the senior PLC class. After that, I never wore any of my PLC shirts because I believe only one who graduated should ever wear them. My point is that when I was in college, and this is just my experience, many Vietnam Vets were treated with disrespect and worse. Now it appears to be the in-thing. Those who served, you definitely do deserve a huge salute from the rest of us...for life.
  • Options
    River RatRiver Rat Member Posts: 9,022
    edited November -1
    Seawolfgunner: don't know if you are still following this thread. Seems I check it every four months or so. Just wanted to say you guys were awesome. It always felt good to know you fellers weren't too far away. I was pushin' a Mk II PBR in late '72.
  • Options
    1USMC11USMC1 Member Posts: 11 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I recommend the book "Stolen Valor" by B.G. Burkett and Glenna Whitley. I couldn't finish it....made me sick. I had no idea what was going on during and after Vietnam with these posers. Made me very angry and sad at the same time.

    I ran into a guy at the supermarket that was wearing a USMC cap and brand new tattoos on his arms and legs, one of which said Vietnam. I walked over to him and asked when he was in Vietnam. He said '69 & '70. During the conversation he told me he was 54 years old. Said he was in Recon....lol and got out in '86. Being 54 years old he would have been 14, 15 years old in '69 -'70. I did the math and called him a liar....he did an about face and walked off.


    R. Moore
    USMC
    Vietnam '66-'67
    4th Marines
  • Options
    KansasGuyKansasGuy Member Posts: 13 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Good catch
    He probably never thought he'd be caught.

    After all - we are actually the quiet and polite part of the "Polite Society".


    The "Vietnam Experience" has lasted longer than the war itself it would seem.
  • Options
    MudderChuckMudderChuck Member Posts: 4,105
    edited November -1
    What about the other way around, somebody who actually served and is raked over the coals by a team of youngsters half there age.
    I had a group on another forum who decided to do a gang tackle, they came out with some really outrageous stuff (my guess is from there limited experience) made it sound plausible and proceeded to try and pick my story apart.
    I wonder how many guys have been falsely castrated, because there experiences don't jive with somebody else's preconceptions.
    I remember some of my military experience when I was still in my teens, a kaleidescope of experiences and images. Some of it I figured out later, some was so bad I tried my darnedest to forget.
    Crap about half the time, I had no idea where I was or what I was doing, it was just go there do that, then move over there and do something else.
  • Options
    Jim RauJim Rau Member Posts: 3,550
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by MudderChuck
    What about the other way around, somebody who actually served and is raked over the coals by a team of youngsters half there age.
    I had a group on another forum who decided to do a gang tackle, they came out with some really outrageous stuff (my guess is from there limited experience) made it sound plausible and proceeded to try and pick my story apart.
    I wonder how many guys have been falsely castrated, because there experiences don't jive with somebody else's preconceptions.
    I remember some of my military experience when I was still in my teens, a kaleidescope of experiences and images. Some of it I figured out later, some was so bad I tried my darnedest to forget.
    Crap about half the time, I had no idea where I was or what I was doing, it was just go there do that, then move over there and do something else.

    That Is the way my two tours in RVN are, just a blur. We were always either totally wore out or totally bored. Very little in between. My second tour I was a crew chief and we would get about 4 hours of sleep on a good night, so we would actually doze between the PZ and the LZ!!!
  • Options
    krawiechkrawiech Member Posts: 135 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    i too was picked apart on this forum in septthe gentlemen stated that i was lying about my service because he was in thw same company but in a different location and different time i was a crew chief on a uh1 in 1965 sept thru sept 1966 i was first assigned to the 52nd avn batt then the company recieved a new company number then we were changed again as the 2nd platoon 282 ahc out of pleiku now the 282 came over in 1966 since ive been back i am on the site for the 282 ahc roster but the other site was closed for some reason so i never could get it straightened out with the gentleman who bad mouthed me thats water over the dam anyway welcome home and i hope your in touch with the va hank
  • Options
    EvanBEvanB Member Posts: 15 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have seen a few and I have seen statistics that said there are 7 times more people claiming to be Viet Nam vets than actually served according to US Census figures. I say - kick their * in a organized military fashion.
  • Options
    appleeapplee Member Posts: 3 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    yes, i think so too, this is a very amazing website, something really worth to read.



    www.amostore.com
  • Options
    Spider7115Spider7115 Member, Moderator Posts: 29,714 ******
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by applee
    yes, i think so too, this is a very amazing website, something really worth to read.



    www.amostore.com


    no%20more%20spam%20thank%20you.jpg
  • Options
    scottish soldierscottish soldier Member Posts: 12 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    good to see that this is not only a problem in the usa.i served in the British army,i wish i had a pound for every nutter i met in a bar who claims he was in the French foreign legion,SAS or USMC.
    i have just read a book written by an English called Tom Abraham,THE CAGE.Not sure if any of you guys have read the book or if any of you are aware of the upset it caused when it was published in 2002.he recieved ?100,000 from the publisher for adavnce sales.i just cant make my mind up about this guy.if you are not aware ,just put his name in the search and follow the thread.I wouldbe great to hear your opinions,would be better if anyone new him.he was in the Air Cav.have a look let me know what you think,if he has lied,he has done the guys that served in Vietnam,an in particular the poor souls that didnt make it back home, aye aye
Sign In or Register to comment.