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Lee Pro 1000, any good?

floorguy24floorguy24 Member Posts: 1,343 ✭✭✭✭✭
I'm looking into reloading 44 Special pistol loads on a regular basis for my own use.

I have no reloading experience at all and have 2 questions;

1) Is the Lee Pro 1000 a good product to learn on?

2) Is the Lee Pro 1000 a good reliable tool for the long haul?

Any input would be greatly appreciated.

Comments

  • gknaka2gknaka2 Member Posts: 461 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Start on a single stage to learn the basics and get the true "feel" of reloading so you master AND UNDERSTAND each step. There is no reason to start on a progressive not knowing how many rounds you will load.

    Later you will probably want a turret press, but many people keep their original single stage for the decap/sizing stage or whatever. If you decide on a turret, Lee makes a good 4-hole for not that much.

    If you are going progressive, the Dillon 550 is very hard to beat. I personally would not get the Lee 1000 as I have heard many people complain about them. Many have found the 1000 over complicated with very poor instructions which would be disastrous for someone just entering the hobby. However, do your research first before making your own conclusions. Lee makes things simple and cheap. I think the 1000 may be an example of a simple company trying to be too fancy. That being said, I do not have one so I have to recommend either the Dillon or Hornady, which seem to be staples.

    I started with a Lee single stage (they sell them new for $30) and reloaded on it for about 10 years.

    I now use a Dillon 550. I am probably one of the few that has a Lee Pro Auto Disk mounted to it instead of the Dillon measure. Just preference. You will see many people favor different setups.

    Good luck and welcome to the hobby...it will consume you.
  • PearywPearyw Member Posts: 3,699
    edited November -1
    I have a Lee 1000 and it is junk.
  • geeguygeeguy Member Posts: 1,047
    edited November -1
    Good to learn on? No!

    As stated above, single stage or turret press (you only need to set the dyes once on a turret). The progressives can get quite frustrating for even experienced loaders when "something" goes wrong.

    Long term quality issues?

    The Lee 1000 is really an inexpensive method for a progressive machine. Can make ammo as good as any other machine. BUT, will not hold up if you are loading many rounds over many years. To light of metal and to many wear points for the plastic parts (I am in the plastic business, so while I love plastics, the types used in that machine do wear out a little faster then I would like)

    Almost all of the shooters I know that started with a Lee press changed over to Dillon within a few years. And to be fair, the Lee was an inexpensive method to start out with, then they found out what they really wanted. They may not have started to reload if they needed to buy an expensive machine to find out if they liked it.

    If you are only loading .44 pistol, you may wish to consider a Dillon Square Deal, which used is about the same price as a new Lee.

    Best of luck
  • rongrong Member Posts: 8,459
    edited November -1
    Bought one sent it back for
    another-got another and that ended
    beeing sent back----CRAPPY!
  • dcs shootersdcs shooters Member Posts: 10,969
    edited November -1
    The Lee Pro 1000 I had cost me a custom 1911 barrel [xx(][:(!]
    Also the primer feed is JUNK, you will have to keep tapping it to feed [B)]
    If you are going to load only pistol rounds, look into a Dillon Square Deal-B. That's what I went to. No problems in about 10,000 rds. loaded. Plus they have a no BS warrenty. Something breaks or wears out, it gets replaced at NO cost [;)]
  • jonkjonk Member Posts: 10,121
    edited November -1
    It's a cantankerous thing. I wouldn't say total junk, I use mine quite a bit, and it is much faster than single stage presses.

    It's issues: Unreliable primer feed, powder dispensing system can fail to charge one case and double charge the next with flake powders in light loads (like Red Dot), unreliable case feeding, unreliable primer sensing arm, insufficient angle on discharge ramp to let loaded round slide out....... and probably some others.

    Pros: It's cheap, and if you are very careful and methodical, it DOES work and will produce decent ammo.

    However, it is not something for a newbie or those easily frustrated.

    I think mine is worth the $100 I paid for it (new old stock in a gun store) but would never say it's great.
  • bpostbpost Member Posts: 31,002 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Buy a Dillon, cry once.
  • floorguy24floorguy24 Member Posts: 1,343 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Wow, thanks for all the replies.

    Looks like I'm going single stage, not the Lee Pro 1000.

    I'll look into the single stage a bit more and post questions on that route soon.


    Thanks Again

    [;)]
  • BGHillbillyBGHillbilly Member Posts: 1,927 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Best way I found to use the 1000 is to use it like a single stage and make use of the case feeder.

    Use with only the sizer die in place and deprime every thing.
    Use a hand primer to prime everything.
    Remove sizing die, install expander and seat die and finish things out.
    Best to have two turrents for caliber and carbide dies so lube is not present to clog things up.
  • haroldchrismeyerharoldchrismeyer Member Posts: 2,213 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The Pro 100 is an acceptable piece of machinery, but as stated, isn't that easy to use. If used properly, you can load 300 rounds per hour. The primer feed takes a lot of getting used to, and until you get used to it, it will make life miserable. The powder measure that comes with it goes in the trash, and you buy the upgraded one. Even then you have to use a powder that works good in the measure. I found Win 231 to be the best. As far as wearing out, if kept lubricated, on straight wall cases, it will last almost forever.

    If you don't want to be aggravated, and you have the money to spend, buy the Dillon. If you don't mind the time to set up, the time to learn how to use it, and how to fix the problems, it is the cheapest way to get a progressive press.
  • CHEVELLE427CHEVELLE427 Member Posts: 6,750
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by jonk
    It's a cantankerous thing. I wouldn't say total junk, I use mine quite a bit, and it is much faster than single stage presses.

    It's issues: Unreliable primer feed, powder dispensing system can fail to charge one case and double charge the next with flake powders in light loads (like Red Dot), unreliable case feeding, unreliable primer sensing arm, insufficient angle on discharge ramp to let loaded round slide out....... and probably some others.Pros: It's cheap, and if you are very careful and methodical, it DOES work and will produce decent ammo.

    However, it is not something for a newbie or those easily frustrated.I think mine is worth the $100 I paid for it (new old stock in a gun store) but would never say it's great.


    as stated above.

    i have had 2 and i use this one a lot but only for resize, flair, prime.

    i have had mine skip a charge so i just do the last steps on my single stage press. and i like to see powder in the case and hand seat the bullet anyway.
    it still saves time when it all works right, i would sell it but have so much in it with 5 turrent set ups were all i have to do is swap the thing out and go on to the next caliber, that makes it easy.
    the last 45acp i did was the worst primming i have ever had , could be a bad cci brick but i had trouble with that batch all the way, must of wasted 20 primers.

    i am use to what to watch out for as i have had pro 1000's for years,
    so i can get by with it, till i find a deal on a better set up.
    YOU HAVE TO WATCH the PRO 1000 ALL THE TIME FOR A SCREW UP.

    quote:Originally posted by floorguy24
    Wow, thanks for all the replies.

    Looks like I'm going single stage, not the Lee Pro 1000.I'll look into the single stage a bit more and post questions on that route soon.


    Thanks Again

    [;)]


    you will always have a need for a single stage press anyway
    when i have everything set up i have the 100 a rcbs rockchunker, a rcbs jr, rcbs primer press all set up to do what ever i need done, from seating a hard primer to pulling a bullet out or crimping.
  • the middlethe middle Member Posts: 3,089
    edited November -1
    dont use it to prime, just plain dont work for that! Use a hand primer!

    case feeder will screw up sometimes but it is useable!
    powder measure works good, and the press itself.

    If you buy a Dillon, beware of the fact that IMR powders will not meter right in any of their powder measures! I called them and they told me to try tapeing a fish pump on them to settle the powder! WTH!
    for the prices of their stuff?!? Ball powders work go though!
  • shoff14shoff14 Member Posts: 11,994 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by the middle
    I called them and they told me to try tapeing a fish pump on them to settle the powder! WTH!



    They tell you fish pump, because it wouldn't be politically correct to tell you to tape a vibrator on them.
  • the middlethe middle Member Posts: 3,089
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by shoff14
    quote:Originally posted by the middle
    I called them and they told me to try tapeing a fish pump on them to settle the powder! WTH!



    They tell you fish pump, because it wouldn't be politically correct to tell you to tape a vibrator on them.


    Ya good one LOL.
  • BGHillbillyBGHillbilly Member Posts: 1,927 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The priming system is what gives me the most headaches.
    First they don't feed, and you have to keep an eye on that.
    Second, somewhow they invert and you don't realize it till after the bullets seated.
    Third, they sometimes seat sideways and because of the other operations you can't feel if the primer seats properly.

    And heaven forbid too many powder spills because that total gums up the works, always seem to have at least one or an accumilation of powder leaking past nonprimed or the sideways primers.
  • CHEVELLE427CHEVELLE427 Member Posts: 6,750
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by BGHillbilly
    The priming system is what gives me the most headaches.
    First they don't feed, and you have to keep an eye on that.
    Second, somewhow they invert and you don't realize it till after the bullets seated Third, they sometimes seat sideways and because of the other operations you can't feel if the primer seats properly..

    And heaven forbid too many powder spills because that total gums up the works, always seem to have at least one or an accumilation of powder leaking past nonprimed or the sideways primers.


    i would say i loose about 10-15 primers per 1000 rounds, would be more if i was not use to watching out for this problem.[;)]

    like i said before the last 500 45acp i did was the worst ever for priming, might be a combination of a bad brick of primers and the press. or might have been the military brass i used.
    i didn't have to swage them so not really sure what one or all of the three was the problem child.[?]
    i guess its time to tear it down and give it a good cleaning[:0]
  • GONESHOOTINGGONESHOOTING Member Posts: 2,450 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have a Dillon Square Deal-B and never have giving me any trouble.
    Just keep it clean.[:)]
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