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I need some help please.

phideaux4886phideaux4886 Member Posts: 1,470 ✭✭✭✭✭
I have a client that I will be seeing on Monday and it turns out he sells CVA muzzle loaders.
I have been thinking of getting an entry level black powder for some time and I may get one for a decent price.
I have no knowledge of the modern guns, other than the basics. I can't recall even seeing one firsthand.
Is it cheaper shooting black powder, than shooting something similar in brass?
I would not want to buy something that would require special equipment to shoot, obviously realizing that there would be some things different in order to be able to shoot it.
Seems that I am seeing 50 caliber being the more popular choice.
I am trying to do some research this weekend so if anyone has an opinion or suggestion, I would appreciate hearing it.
Thanks,
DSM

Comments

  • allen griggsallen griggs Member Posts: 32,920 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Is it cheaper shooting black powder, than shooting something similar in brass?

    I don't understand the question.
    Do you want an inline or traditional?
  • phideaux4886phideaux4886 Member Posts: 1,470 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I do believe it would be inline.
    DSM
  • smokinggunsmokinggun Member Posts: 590 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I own a CVA Elkhorn magnum and it is a excellent rifle. It's not fancy at all but it is a extremely accurate rifle at a very fair price. CVA barrels are made in Spain are are some of the best. The same rifle made by Knight would have cost me quite a bit more. I hunt with mine and it can get expensive at the range but is very affordable for hunting deer. I use 45 cal Powerbelt bullets that cost around $1.00 per bullet and three 50 gr. pyrodex pellets which probably cost 50 cents per shot. Hope this helps.
  • Winston BodeWinston Bode Member Posts: 1,628 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The rifle is just the initial expense. What comes next are the numerous items you will need to shoot a muzzleloader,

    Short starter, nipple wrench, possibles bag, nipple pick, wedge puller(traditional firearms only), powder, balls or bullets, caps, powder measure, powder horn or flask, and an extra ramrod. Probably more but I haven't shot mine in a while. Anyway, you get the idea.

    Bode
  • rgergergerge Member Posts: 183 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Go side lock, you'll learn more off the bat, then you can move up.[:D]
  • phideaux4886phideaux4886 Member Posts: 1,470 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks all. [:)]
    DSM
  • twin60stwin60s Member Posts: 156 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    dont waste your money on an inline.
  • smokinggunsmokinggun Member Posts: 590 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote: dont waste your money on an inline.
    twin60s, care to elaborate?
  • rgergergerge Member Posts: 183 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I hear nothing but good things about inlines, I just don't care for the profile, reminds me of an old H&R .20 shotgun. I can load and fire my side lock 3 times a minute, not that I would have to deer hunting but I like the old world charm, my son has taken quite a shine to them also. If you're just out for a hunting firearm go inline, if you're in it for the hobby of it, I think you'll get more fun out of a side or flintlock. That's just my opinion.[;)]
  • bull300wsmbull300wsm Member Posts: 3,289
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by rgerge
    I hear nothing but good things about inlines, I just don't care for the profile, reminds me of an old H&R .20 shotgun. I can load and fire my side lock 3 times a minute, not that I would have to deer hunting but I like the old world charm, my son has taken quite a shine to them also. If you're just out for a hunting firearm go inline, if you're in it for the hobby of it, I think you'll get more fun out of a side or flintlock. That's just my opinion.[;)]


    +1 rgerge..I actually like cleaning the sidelocks[^]
  • anderskandersk Member Posts: 3,825
    edited November -1
    BP and round ball is certainly cheaper, unless your are shooting .22's!
  • glabrayglabray Member Posts: 679 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    You might want to do a little research and ask yourself a question or two before making a decision on traditional design vs inline.
    (1) Do you want to experience real old-time muzzle loading or do you simply want to be able to hunt in the "primitive" seasons with something as close to a modern gun as possible?
    (2) What are you going to hunt? Do the states you may hunt in have any minimum caliber requirements (.54 cal. for elk for instance)?
    (3) Are you willing to put up with the loading and cleaning requirements of black powder?
  • phideaux4886phideaux4886 Member Posts: 1,470 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Glabray,
    1) I want to be able to hunt deer during the muzzle loader season, but I am not going to rush and try to make this season, I have 8-9 months.
    2) Deer and no requirements that I know of. I am seeing more and more information saying .50 caliber is the way to go.
    3) Yes, I do not mind cleaning guns, I rather enjoy it.
    Thanks,
    DSM
    PS. I did not buy the gun from that fellow, at least not yet.
  • Little WattsyLittle Wattsy Member Posts: 2 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    One VERY important thing to consider is how the rifle FEELS in your shooting stance, The extreame cresent butt plates on some of the "traditional" guns are not comfortable to me....the shotgun style butt plate however is great. Both can be found on traditional side hammer guns but you will need to know what you want to find it.
    Most all new inlines have a nice recoil pad in place.
    I shoot a Knight Bighorn for deer and a T/C Hwaken for fun and rabbits.
  • anderskandersk Member Posts: 3,825
    edited November -1
    For deer hunting I use and recommend the T/C Omega 50. Very reliable and a great shooter.

    For the "true" Muzzle loader BP experience, I use and recommend the Hawken cap lock.

    And I'd get a .50 calibre for sure.
  • rja72rja72 Member Posts: 141 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have the Cabela's (investarms) .50 hawken. Like it. patterns pretty good. Took at deer with it this years at 50yrds with a PRB.
  • phideaux4886phideaux4886 Member Posts: 1,470 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Well I ordered and paid for a CVA Wolf .50 cal, finally and I ordered from the client mentioned in the first post.
    I have been walking up to bp gunrack at Cabela's and feeling them up for a few months now and the Wolf felt the best to me and being a newbie I don't have a lot invested at this point. (I got it for a little less than what Cablea's offered)
    I'll pick it up this week.
    Thanks for all the help way back then.
    DSM
  • anderskandersk Member Posts: 3,825
    edited November -1
    It all depends how primitive you want to go. And for what it's worth I have both in-line (T/C Omega 50), and it is a great shooting gun for hunting deer. And I have an Italian made Percussion Cap Hawken that I use for plinking and BP Shoots at the club. It shoots just fine and they are cheap.

    Both are cheap and fun to shoot but the Hawken is cheaper because it handles round ball just fine. The T/C has too fast of a twist for round ball, so it takes sabots which do cost more. Sabots and conical bullets are more accurate. The fast twist 1/28 inches causes round ball to be a bit erratic in my in-line gun.
  • rgergergerge Member Posts: 183 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    This all may be well and good, BUT, an inline is gonna look stupid over your fireplace[;)]

    Get your self a .54 cal thompson hawken, best of both worlds, accurate AND good looks!!
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