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Wanting to buy 1874 Sharps "Quigley". Need advice.

void.pointervoid.pointer Member Posts: 22 ✭✭
Hi,

I'm not very experienced with guns, but ever since I saw Quigley Down Under, I always wanted his rifle. I recently found out about Shiloh Sharps, but the rifle they have runs over $4000, which is entirely too expensive for me.

I went to a local gun dealer and found out that he could get me the same replica for half as much, but made by Uberti. If you visit this link (http://www.cimarron-firearms.com/SingleShotRifles/PedSharps.htm), the second rifle from the top is the one they would order for me at $1995.

Is this a good quality replica? The local dealer said it could be available in a couple of days, 3-4 days. It's 45-110, but I was told that 45-70 was the only replica made by Uberti. Is this a scam? I was also told that 45-110 is more expensive and harder to find parts for, but I think the extra power would be awesome. I have never shot the 70 or the 110, so I want to make sure I won't have any regrets. Is there much of a kick difference between the 70 and 110 grain?

Anyway, I just need a little more information about the rifles and how it is manufactured. I not only want to make sure I'm getting a good deal and a very good quality rifle, but I also want to make sure this gun will never get boring. I plan to make this my "one and only", which is why I'm willing to put in the $2000 for it.

Thanks in advance.

Comments

  • 44caliberkid44caliberkid Member Posts: 925 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Since you are a novice shooter, the "Quigley Special" would be just fine. Do a search for Pedersoli Quigley's on this website and you'll probably find one for less yet. I've known shooters who have had Pedersolis and Shilohs and as far as shooting, there was no difference.
  • void.pointervoid.pointer Member Posts: 22 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by 44caliberkid
    Since you are a novice shooter, the "Quigley Special" would be just fine. Do a search for Pedersoli Quigley's on this website and you'll probably find one for less yet. I've known shooters who have had Pedersolis and Shilohs and as far as shooting, there was no difference.

    Does this mean the rifle on the website I linked to will be just fine? I'm not sure if it is a "Quigley Special" or not. Does this also mean the 110 grain is sufficient?
  • crstrodecrstrode Member Posts: 8 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Take a look at the latest Cabela's catalog. They have something you may be interested in.

    http://www.cabelas.com/*-1/0012654213902a.shtml

    i213902sn01.jpg

    On sale now for $1699

    The same basic gun, Without all the fancy bells and whistles, the Sharps sporting rifle, is on sale for only $999
    i212119sn01.jpg
  • void.pointervoid.pointer Member Posts: 22 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by crstrode

    Take a look at the latest Cabela's catalog. They have something you may be interested in.

    http://www.cabelas.com/*-1/0012654213902a.shtml

    i213902sn01.jpg

    On sale now for $1699

    The same basic gun, Without all the fancy bells and whistles, the Sharps sporting rifle, is on sale for only $999
    i212119sn01.jpg



    I actually went to the Cabela's in Fort Worth, Texas and the version of this gun they had, which was about $1,600 and was titled "Quigley", did not have all of the features in the picture. No patch box, and was pretty dull looking (Like the bottom picture you posted). This worries me that no "Quigley" rifle is the same, they're all mysteriously different or something...

    I don't know, this rifle seems like a maintenance nightmare. Expensive to maintain (Ammo, reloading supplies, etc), and parts are hard to find. I may just go with a 45 pistol or something. The Super Hawg 14 round pistol looks nice, and it's half as cheap.
  • slumlord44slumlord44 Member Posts: 3,702 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If I were you I would go with the Pedersoli Quigley only get it in .45-70. Ammo and reloading, if you so choose, is a lot cheaper and easier to go with. You will probably have as much fun for less trouble and money. You will probably have to pick up a tang sight to make it right. Another option is to get a plain Pedersoli Sharps used. I recently picked up a nice one in .45-70 with a tang sight used for $800. Does not have all the frills of the Quigley, but will be accruate and a heck of a lot of fun for a little money. Some day I hope to break down and spend the cash for the real Shiloh Quigley!
  • Hawk CarseHawk Carse Member Posts: 4,319 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Pedersoli is the best of the Italian replica Sharps.
    Uberti does not make Sharps, they get them from Pedersoli.

    The Quigley model is a movie prop, chosen for visual impact when carried on screen by a tall actor. A 34" barrel and a military stock make for a poorly balanced hard kicking gun, worse in the script-correct .45-110.

    You would have more fun actually shooting a sporting, target, or silhouette model Sharps replica with shotgun butt and 30" barrel. That is by far the most common setup for active BPCR shooters.

    Unless you are a proficient and experienced black powder handloader, you would be a lot better off with the common .45-70 than the .45-2 7/8" (so-called .45-110). The longer the case, the harder it is to get good smokeless loads.
  • longrangerbolongrangerbo Member Posts: 5 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Having shot crappy guns and some really good ones in particular single shot black powder rifles.
    If you're not to hung up on the "Quigly" model from either Shilo or Pedersoli.
    I cannot see spending $1600.00 for the Pedersoli when you get a basic Shilo #3 with a cheek rest and pistol grip for $200.00.more.
    If you have never handled a Shilo 1874 you owe it to yourself to compare the two options(Shilo/Pedersoli).
    Their simply is no comparison between the two, Shilo you get to pick your cartridge and not what's available at Cabelas or where ever else they exist.
    If you don't mind the wait they are perhaps the best made rifle in this country.
    I bought a Uberti Highwall 45-70($800.00-$900.00) to get started,good shooters better barrels than Pedersoli except the Gibbs rifle(Best long range M/L available)
    You'll have plenty of time to pay for it.
    If you're in a hurry Bill Goodman(goodmanguns.com) could get you one in 4-6 mos.for a modest fee.
    I just think the Shilos have better metal, wood,fit, finish and world class service after the sale.
    It is true that the Pedersoli shoot good they just miss the mark of good ole' American artisians building an incredible rifle.
    The dollar difference is there for a reason.
    Educate yourself before plunking down your hard earned dollars.
    Another mans opinion.
  • mazo kidmazo kid Member Posts: 648 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I can understand your wanting the "Quigley" model Sharps and think the Pedersoli would be the way to go if that is really what you want. HOWEVER, having said that, I had a Shiloh in 45-110 and the recoil wasn't all that bad (I don't think I would want to shoot a whole afternoon from the bench tho), it was the cost of brass and the fact that it fouled quite badly, also uses a LOT of powder. I never got it to shoot well so traded it to a buddy, an accomplished BPCR shooter and he had the same problem. Yeah, I know some guys do make them shoot quite well; I just never got the right combination of powder, bullet, compression, seating depth, etc. On the plus side, you can make do reloading with the 45-70 dies; the 45-110 dies are quite pricey. FWIW. Emery
  • void.pointervoid.pointer Member Posts: 22 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by mazo kid
    I can understand your wanting the "Quigley" model Sharps and think the Pedersoli would be the way to go if that is really what you want. HOWEVER, having said that, I had a Shiloh in 45-110 and the recoil wasn't all that bad (I don't think I would want to shoot a whole afternoon from the bench tho), it was the cost of brass and the fact that it fouled quite badly, also uses a LOT of powder. I never got it to shoot well so traded it to a buddy, an accomplished BPCR shooter and he had the same problem. Yeah, I know some guys do make them shoot quite well; I just never got the right combination of powder, bullet, compression, seating depth, etc. On the plus side, you can make do reloading with the 45-70 dies; the 45-110 dies are quite pricey. FWIW. Emery


    I ended up getting the Para Super Hawg (1911, .45 ACP, Double-stack 14rd mag, 6" bbl). Great gun, less expensive to shoot, less maintenance!

    Thanks for all of the discussion. I realized that the 1874 sharps, while it is an awesome looking gun, it just isn't practical for me. I'm not a gun expert and I don't want to have to have to deal with something that's expensive to use and maintain.
  • Hawk CarseHawk Carse Member Posts: 4,319 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Don't do squat on a 500 metre ram target, though.
  • void.pointervoid.pointer Member Posts: 22 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Hawk Carse
    Don't do squat on a 500 metre ram target, though.


    True, but when I get around to having a target like that I'll consider a more modern rifle.
  • 44caliberkid44caliberkid Member Posts: 925 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I ended up getting the Para Super Hawg (1911, .45 ACP, Double-stack 14rd mag, 6" bbl). Great gun, less expensive to shoot, less maintenance!

    Thanks for all of the discussion. I realized that the 1874 sharps, while it is an awesome looking gun, it just isn't practical for me. I'm not a gun expert and I don't want to have to have to deal with something that's expensive to use and maintain.
    [/quote]

    Well, if it was easy we'd all be Matthew Quigley, wouldn't we?
  • void.pointervoid.pointer Member Posts: 22 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by 44caliberkid


    I ended up getting the Para Super Hawg (1911, .45 ACP, Double-stack 14rd mag, 6" bbl). Great gun, less expensive to shoot, less maintenance!

    Thanks for all of the discussion. I realized that the 1874 sharps, while it is an awesome looking gun, it just isn't practical for me. I'm not a gun expert and I don't want to have to have to deal with something that's expensive to use and maintain.

    So true! Too bad I ain't rich! I can barely afford the expense of the 45 ACP ammo.

    Well, if it was easy we'd all be Matthew Quigley, wouldn't we?
    [/quote]
  • GoldenRoyBoyGoldenRoyBoy Member Posts: 2 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hello VP!
    I'm late to the party but just couldn't pass on commenting. I'm new to the site as well; hello!

    I own four Sharps; two C. Sharps and two Shiloh Sharps. I bought all four used. I didn't pay over $1800 for any of them. My favorite is a C. Sharps in 32-40. This little gem of a rifle came with venier sights, which is great. But, that's beside the point. I also, along the way tried a Pedersoli. Soorrry, but there's just no comparison in the quality. Yes, the P gun shot fine. But, you better not bump it or, bang it against anything. The metal was just so soft.

    Anyway, I wish you well in whatever you decide to purchase. There's a lot of great guns out there. I love the 45-70 caliber in just about anything. Have you thought about a Trapdoor? SO cool, if you load your own. And, cheap compared to the rest.

    GRB
  • RoofussRoofuss Member Posts: 22 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I bought a Pedersoli 45-70 Silhouette model used awhile back and was a fine shooter and well made . I have a buddy who ordered a Shiloh 45-70 about 4 years ago { took 18 months to get it }and loves the gun. They are both well made and good shooting rifles , but the overall quality of the Shiloh had me sold [:)] I called the Shiloh office regarding any rifles in work, that may be available in the near future. They had 3-4 guns that were in process, and as yet unsold ..my Montana RoughRider 45-70 with 32" MVA scope should be here by the end of October. [:p]
  • CryptoChiefCryptoChief Member Posts: 100 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    void.pointer

    If you ever do decide to get a "sharps" regardless of who makes it, you don't need a 34 inch barrel to get the job done. 30 is a plenty. You stand the chance of leading at about the 32 inch point. Not a good thing accuracy wise. Trust me I know. I own a 34 inch Pedersoli Boss Gun. After about 5 shots I have to clean the bore to get the lead out of the last two to three inches of bore. Some food for thought.

    CC
  • SpartacusSpartacus Member Posts: 14,415
    edited November -1
    wasn't that a sharps rifle in "unforgiven" (clint eastwood).
    if so, what model was it?
    thanks
    tom
  • swearengineswearengine Member Posts: 1,329 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by tplumeri
    wasn't that a sharps rifle in "unforgiven" (clint eastwood).
    if so, what model was it?
    thanks
    tom



    No, that was a Spencer.
  • SpartacusSpartacus Member Posts: 14,415
    edited November -1
    quote:No, that was a Spencer

    yep, now i remember! thanks!
    tom
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