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I'm not up on California Gun Laws ...

kimberkidkimberkid Member Posts: 8,857 ✭✭✭
edited November 2019 in Ask the Experts
So I'm gonna ask the experts, even though I'm pretty sure I know the answer.

I've got some Original 1950's era Armalite AR-10 magazines on the auction side.

A potential buyer wanted to know if I could break down the mags and ship them to him as parts.

I do want to sell them, but not enough to break the law, and as I understand their laws, shipping them mag parts wouldn't be any different than if I sold them the complete mags ... is it?
If you really desire something, you'll find a way ?
? otherwise, you'll find an excuse.

Comments

  • JIM STARKJIM STARK Member Posts: 1,114 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    IIRC... Ca. considers mag parts just like complete mags...I personally wouldn't do it!!
    JIM...........
  • kimberkidkimberkid Member Posts: 8,857 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks ... That'll be my answer.
    If you really desire something, you'll find a way ?
    ? otherwise, you'll find an excuse.
  • mark christianmark christian Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 24,524 ******
    edited November -1
    Sending a "knocked down" magazine is now the same as sending it assembled.

    "CA penal code 12020(a)(2) reads:

    Commencing January 1, 2000, manufactures or causes to be manufactured, imports into the state, keeps for sale, or offers or exposes for sale, or who gives, or lends, any large-capacity magazine."

    Putting the parts together is manufacturing a magazine.

    It is still possible to purchase minor parts such as springs of followers for magazine which were in possession prior to the cut off date, but a magazine body is a now magazine, whether or not the internal parts are included.
  • yoshmysteryoshmyster Member Posts: 19,869 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I wouldn't play his game.

    It's strange though one can buy "blocked" magazine with a stick of wood that can be removed by sliding the floor plate. Now with the stick that may skirt the "law" if the money's good enough.
  • mrmike08075mrmike08075 Member Posts: 11,826 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Blocked or limited magazines must now be permanently and irreparably altered - must by law be rendered impossible to unblock or restore to original capacity...

    They changed that rule and became quite strict and clear on the matter eliminating any possible loophole you might imagine or attempt...

    In many states attaching two or more legal low capacity magazines together resulting in a combined number of rounds above a posted legislated limit is also strictly prohibited and considered a criminal act...

    That device they sell were 3 ruger 10/22 mags Lego connect around a central plastic hub is strictly verboten and a big cap criminally liable device or activity...

    No more wooden dowels or plastic plugs.

    I am not exaggerating.

    Mike
  • kimberkidkimberkid Member Posts: 8,857 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks for all the replies ... its pretty much as I thought.
    --
    I told him "Sorry, California considers mag parts the same as complete mags".
    If you really desire something, you'll find a way ?
    ? otherwise, you'll find an excuse.
  • mark christianmark christian Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 24,524 ******
    edited November -1
    The magazine restrictions were tightened up several years ago, even for dealers. Once upon a time, a High Capacity Magazine Permit was easy for dealers to obtain: you simply just checked a box on the back of the form for your yearly license renewal. There was no fee for the magazine permit, which was shocking since CA is all about fees, so of course every dealer wanted the permit. Five or six years ago it all changed. Now to get the magazine permit, a dealer has to prove a "need." The only sure way to do that was to send copies of sales orders from PDs who you'd done business with before. Sales of magazines between CA dealers didn't count. That way the two dealers couldn't "pad" their sales.

    Freedom Week really riled up the politicos in Sacramento, so beginning in 2023, magazines of any capacity will be considered Firearms Precursor Parts and can only be shipped to dealers or to parts venders, who will become a new classification of permit holders:


    16531. (a) As used in this part, commencing July 1, 2023, ?firearm precursor part? means a component of a firearm that is generally necessary to build or assemble a firearm and is included in one of the following categories:

    (1) A firearm barrel.

    (2) An ammunition feeding device, including, but not limited to, a magazine or speed loader.

    [a long list of common firearms parts follows]
  • dfletcherdfletcher Member Posts: 8,150 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    kimberkid wrote:
    So I'm gonna ask the experts, even though I'm pretty sure I know the answer.

    I've got some Original 1950's era Armalite AR-10 magazines on the auction side.

    A potential buyer wanted to know if I could break down the mags and ship them to him as parts.

    I do want to sell them, but not enough to break the law, and as I understand their laws, shipping them mag parts wouldn't be any different than if I sold them the complete mags ... is it?

    The buyer is probably just a few years behind the times. Used to be that even after the "hi cap" ban we could legally get magazine "rebuild kits" which were essentially a disassembled magazine. In theory one could replace all the parts on an existing magazine, including the body. Who knew AR and AK mags were so fragile ??

    That ended about 3 years back. There was a well known reprieve of sorts via a court case earlier this year, but that window quickly closed after a weekend.
  • mac10mac10 Member Posts: 2,082 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    needs a friend in the next state over :roll:
  • mrmike08075mrmike08075 Member Posts: 11,826 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    To put money on your commissary account when your in federal prison.

    Mike
This discussion has been closed.