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Glock ...Boom...!

Grunt2Grunt2 Member Posts: 1,491 ✭✭✭
Went to the range yesterday with a new Glock model 35..(40S&W)..Looked like conventional rifling (NOT polygonal)...After about 100-150 rounds of cast bullets we had a case rupture...Blew the mag out, broke the grip plug and the extractor was never found..When we were picking up the brass we noticed the pattern of ejected brass had slowly changed the more we shot. As the pattern shifted rearward of the shooter the pressure signs became more apparent on the brass. Thankfully nobody was standing to the right of the shooter!
I'll stay with my 1911's...
Retired LEO
Combat Vet VN

Comments

  • jtmarine0831jtmarine0831 Member Posts: 908 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Stick with a 1911 or try an XD!

    Sorry about the boom in a new Glock though.

    You are alright I assume!

    quote:Mk 19
    NEVER use lead bullets in a Glock, that is not a gun problem, it is a shooter problem.

    The problem he had with the Glock has nothing to do with lead bullets, it is a design issue. Anyways using ammo with lead bullets is less stress full on the chamber due to the bullet being softer than jackets bullets and taking less pressure to send it home. I am not totally knocking Glocks, but this IS a more and more common problem with them. I'll stick with my XD45! All I recommend is that all you Glock shooters do is pay close attention to the pressure signs and sounds and inspect your pistol regularly!
  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    Glocks do not support the bottom of chamber as well as some other [:p]1911[:p] type pistols. I bet if you look at cases they will start to see a bulge. be fore the Boom.
  • Mk 19Mk 19 Member Posts: 8,170
    edited November -1
    NEVER use lead bullets in a Glock, that is not a gun problem, it is a shooter problem.

    quote:quote:
    Mk 19
    NEVER use lead bullets in a Glock, that is not a gun problem, it is a shooter problem.



    The problem he had with the Glock has nothing to do with lead bullets, it is a design issue. Anyways using ammo with lead bullets is less stress full on the chamber due to the bullet being softer than jackets bullets and taking less pressure to send it home. I am not totally knocking Glocks, but this IS a more and more common problem with them. I'll stick with my XD45! All I recommend is that all you Glock shooters do is pay close attention to the pressure signs and sounds and inspect your pistol regularly!

    I am not a fan of the Glock series and I will never own one, heck I don't enen like selling them to others, but it is well known that you do not fire lead bullets in a polygonal barrel. Yes there is a design issue with the glock useing a non supported chamber, but if the cautions are followed that problem becomes a moot point.
  • jtmarine0831jtmarine0831 Member Posts: 908 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Mk 19
    NEVER use lead bullets in a Glock, that is not a gun problem, it is a shooter problem.

    quote:quote:
    Mk 19
    NEVER use lead bullets in a Glock, that is not a gun problem, it is a shooter problem.



    The problem he had with the Glock has nothing to do with lead bullets, it is a design issue. Anyways using ammo with lead bullets is less stress full on the chamber due to the bullet being softer than jackets bullets and taking less pressure to send it home. I am not totally knocking Glocks, but this IS a more and more common problem with them. I'll stick with my XD45! All I recommend is that all you Glock shooters do is pay close attention to the pressure signs and sounds and inspect your pistol regularly!

    I am not a fan of the Glock series and I will never own one, heck I don't enen like selling them to others, but it is well known that you do not fire lead bullets in a polygonal barrel. Yes there is a design issue with the glock useing a non supported chamber, but if the cautions are followed that problem becomes a moot point.


    My apologies for the misunderstanding! I was not meaning that the lead bullets had nothing to do with the problem experienced. What I was refering to is the the design flaws of the unsupported chamber and the fairly sharp transition between the chamber and the rifling that is prone to severe build up causing the pistol not close to full battery. This flaw of severe build up is common even when lead bullets have never been used. I am glad that you think twice about selling them to others, to me that shows that you care about your customers, I wish every salesman was like that. By biggest beef with Glocks are the total lack of safeties! And people wonder why there are so many accidental shootings.


    On the taste of the Buck! I have never had a deer that big taste that good!
  • Mk 19Mk 19 Member Posts: 8,170
    edited November -1
    quote:quote:
    Originally posted by Mk 19

    NEVER use lead bullets in a Glock, that is not a gun problem, it is a shooter problem.


    quote:
    quote:
    Mk 19
    NEVER use lead bullets in a Glock, that is not a gun problem, it is a shooter problem.



    The problem he had with the Glock has nothing to do with lead bullets, it is a design issue. Anyways using ammo with lead bullets is less stress full on the chamber due to the bullet being softer than jackets bullets and taking less pressure to send it home. I am not totally knocking Glocks, but this IS a more and more common problem with them. I'll stick with my XD45! All I recommend is that all you Glock shooters do is pay close attention to the pressure signs and sounds and inspect your pistol regularly!



    I am not a fan of the Glock series and I will never own one, heck I don't enen like selling them to others, but it is well known that you do not fire lead bullets in a polygonal barrel. Yes there is a design issue with the glock useing a non supported chamber, but if the cautions are followed that problem becomes a moot point.




    My apologies for the misunderstanding! I was not meaning that the lead bullets had nothing to do with the problem experienced. What I was refering to is the the design flaws of the unsupported chamber and the fairly sharp transition between the chamber and the rifling that is prone to severe build up causing the pistol not close to full battery. This flaw of severe build up is common even when lead bullets have never been used. I am glad that you think twice about selling them to others, to me that shows that you care about your customers, I wish every salesman was like that. By biggest beef with Glocks are the total lack of safeties! And people wonder why there are so many accidental shootings.

    Not a problem JT, Like you there are several things that I do not care for in a Glock, but the worst thing to me is how it fits my hand. There are so many better choices out there with better ergonomics and built in safety systems. I also prefer a hammer pistol with a decocker over a striker fired gun, there are different opinions on that but I know what I like.

    BTW: That is a great buck you have there, does he taist as good as he looks?
  • dcs shootersdcs shooters Member Posts: 10,969
    edited November -1
    You found why Glock says not to use lead loads in their barrels. The worst ones are the 40's as you found out. A friend did the same with a 21 the same way.
  • jonkjonk Member Posts: 10,121
    edited November -1
    They say no lead, but I know guys on the cast boolit forum who have put hundreds of thousands of rounds of hard cast bullets through a polygonal rifled glock with no issues. I don't own one so no matter. I think the main thing would be to make sure you aren't getting ANY leading because with those shallow shallow grooves, any leading will be too much FAST.
  • Grunt2Grunt2 Member Posts: 1,491 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The model 35 belongs to my brother and nobody was injured. I would never own a Glock! The barrel was not a polygonal barrel and nowhere in the literature that came with the weapon is there ANY mention or warning ref. lead or cast bullet ammunition. No such warning can be found on their WEB site either..The following are the only references made to ammunition (taken from their site):

    7. Before firing your weapon, you should routinely make sure that your firearm is in good working order and that the barrel is clear of dirt and obstructions.
    8. Only use ammunition recommended by the firearm manufacturer, and always be certain that the ammunition matches the caliber of your gun.

    I owned a Baby Eagle in 40S&W with a polygonal barrel and never had a problem. I have put 100's of thousands of cast rounds through my 1911's and don't even own a 45 cal. bore brush! The only jacketed ammunition I shoot is for testing or qualification. With the Glock...looks like you would have to carry a cleaning rod around all the time!
    Perry...With a clean barrel (Glock)the brass is no more or less supported than a common 1911 barrel. But as stated in the orig. post...You could tell from looking at the brass when the lead build up began. It was progressively pushed out of the chamber from the lead build up until there was sufficient brass not supported by the barrel...causing the rupture. I am confident that had he been on a firing line with other shooters....the person to his right would have been injured from brass fragments as well as the missing extractor...He's not an avid shooter so most likely he'll stay with jacketed ammunition from now on and avoid the problems.
    Retired LEO
    Combat Vet VN
  • dtknowlesdtknowles Member Posts: 810 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I don't know about glocks but on other pistols ff the round is not fully chambered (slide not fully in battery) the disconnector should not allow the firing pin to be released. Do Glocks have this type of disconnector?
    Tim
  • blackhawk45blackhawk45 Member Posts: 481 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Mk 19
    NEVER use lead bullets in a Glock, that is not a gun problem, it is a shooter problem.

    quote:quote:
    Mk 19
    NEVER use lead bullets in a Glock, that is not a gun problem, it is a shooter problem.
    Your right Mk19
    Read the Manual,never shoot lead bullets through Polygonal Rifling


    The problem he had with the Glock has nothing to do with lead bullets, it is a design issue. Anyways using ammo with lead bullets is less stress full on the chamber due to the bullet being softer than jackets bullets and taking less pressure to send it home. I am not totally knocking Glocks, but this IS a more and more common problem with them. I'll stick with my XD45! All I recommend is that all you Glock shooters do is pay close attention to the pressure signs and sounds and inspect your pistol regularly!

    I am not a fan of the Glock series and I will never own one, heck I don't enen like selling them to others, but it is well known that you do not fire lead bullets in a polygonal barrel. Yes there is a design issue with the glock useing a non supported chamber, but if the cautions are followed that problem becomes a moot point.
  • blackhawk45blackhawk45 Member Posts: 481 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by jtmarine0831
    quote:Originally posted by Mk 19
    NEVER use lead bullets in a Glock, that is not a gun problem, it is a shooter problem.

    quote:quote:
    Mk 19
    NEVER use lead bullets in a Glock, that is not a gun problem, it is a shooter problem.



    The problem he had with the Glock has nothing to do with lead bullets, it is a design issue. Anyways using ammo with lead bullets is less stress full on the chamber due to the bullet being softer than jackets bullets and taking less pressure to send it home. I am not totally knocking Glocks, but this IS a more and more common problem with them. I'll stick with my XD45! All I recommend is that all you Glock shooters do is pay close attention to the pressure signs and sounds and inspect your pistol regularly!

    I am not a fan of the Glock series and I will never own one, heck I don't enen like selling them to others, but it is well known that you do not fire lead bullets in a polygonal barrel. Yes there is a design issue with the glock useing a non supported chamber, but if the cautions are followed that problem becomes a moot point.


    My apologies for the misunderstanding! I was not meaning that the lead bullets had nothing to do with the problem experienced. What I was refering to is the the design flaws of the unsupported chamber and the fairly sharp transition between the chamber and the rifling that is prone to severe build up causing the pistol not close to full battery. This flaw of severe build up is common even when lead bullets have never been used. I am glad that you think twice about selling them to others, to me that shows that you care about your customers, I wish every salesman was like that. By biggest beef with Glocks are the total lack of safeties! And people wonder why there are so many accidental shootings.
    every Glock has three safetys!!!!!!!!

    On the taste of the Buck! I have never had a deer that big taste that good!
  • ladamsladams Member Posts: 604 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Now you know why I will never own a glock.... i have heard of this problem a bunch of times... in fact at the range where i shoot there was a guy who had one kaboom...
  • mark308mark308 Member Posts: 44 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    why would you take a new gun out and shoot 100-150 rounds, lead, and NOT look at the gun alittle sooner? even with jacketed bullets and something new it would be nice to see how its doing? maybe you would have seen the problem. even when I shoot a revolver for awhile I look to see if theres any buildup. next time instead of blazing away to entertain yourself try taking care of your gun. not trying to be mean, but did you learn anything other than its the manufacturers fault?
  • eastbankeastbank Member Posts: 4,215
    edited November -1
    every new handgun i get to carry has to fire 200 rounds with out a jam with out cleaning. and i use reloaded hard cast lead bullets to keep the cost down. i have several 1911,s two colt 1911,s and a IAI-6000 in 45, a S&W 411 in 40 S&W and a S&W 3913 in 9mm. they all passed the 200 round test with flying colors. so i guess no glocks for me. eastbank.
  • sandwarriorsandwarrior Member Posts: 5,599
    edited November -1
    +1 on what dtknowles said about not firing until the slide is locked in battery. My 1911 and my CZ 40P won't fire until pushed all the way forward. All I can say is I'm glad I don't and haven't owned a glock. good to know reason why not to buy one either.
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